Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
huffy

Preferred tire width for plowing

Recommended Posts

huffy
I want to make my garden much bigger next spring, so I'm trying to get my '67 Landlord set up for it. It needs new tires, so I'll likely get some lugs. What width is preferrable, 6, 8.5, or 10.5? Is there that much difference in traction? Are the narrower widths preferrable so that the right side tire rides in the plow rut?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Homesteader
i would use 8.5 carslile lugs. with 10.5 they get pretty wide and dont fit into the furrow very well. at leat with my tractor the dont. i know timflurry had 8.5 carslile power tracs on his tractor at my plowday and did very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BLT
I had 8.5 Carlisle lugs along with Homesteader and timflury that day. Traction was not a problem. I bottomed out in a fairly deep furrow left by Tim in one spot, and a wider tire wouldn't help. And when your outside drive wheel is off the ground, a ton of weights would only make it worse for the guy pulling you out.wah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
timflury
I run loaded 8.5s like the guys mentioned. I also made up a 60# wheel weight for the left rear tire. I have the 8" Simplicity 25# weights on the front of my 2110 with loaded tri ribs. I have no problem pulling the plow through the soil. I even broke hard clay for a customer in the spring. That made the tractor work hard, but I was able to plow and till a 50x12' plot in less than two hours. I have a spare tire and rim that I would like to get on the tractor for the left side, but it would be just for looks. And I tip the scales at a svelt 185#. http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=116043

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
perry
i use 6-12's. no weight just my big butt :D. my ground is not the greatest and it pulls thru good. i have had the frontend come up a few times also.
[img]http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l226/perry71/garden002.jpg[/img]

[img]http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l226/perry71/garden003.jpg[/img]

[img]http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l226/perry71/garden004.jpg[/img]

[img]http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l226/perry71/OCTpics002.jpg[/img]
and yes the left outter wheel does come off the ground sometimes .
[img]http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l226/perry71/april21plowday098.jpg[/img]

[img]http://i97.photobucket.com/albums/l226/perry71/garden022.jpg[/img]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
perry
quote:
Originally posted by D10-Allis
8.5 Loaded Carlisle
[img]/club2/attach/D10-Allis/alterpic104.jpg[/img]

man i would love a field like that ^. my property is mostly wooded, but my neighbor has a old horse pasture he does not use anymore and i'm thinking of asking him to let me plant it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
huffy
quote:
Originally posted by timflury
I tip the scales at a svelt 185#.
Weight shouldn't be a problem. I've got nearly 100# on you. Plus I intend to load the tires with Rim Guard. And if all that doesn't work I've got two 55# wheel weights that I can bolt on; both stacked on the left side if need be. From the responses, it seems that the 8.5's and 6's both work fine. So I guess it just comes down to which size I think looks better. I prefer the look of those 6's on Perry's tractor, but I called around today and couldn't locate someone local that carry's them. I hate ordering stuff, so I guess 8'5's it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ezliving4ume
quote:
Originally posted by Willy
Hey Perry I like the weight box on the back of your tractor. How much weight dose a 12 pack of PBR add??:D
Nice thing about that type of weight box is its adjustable on the go.:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
timflury
Now Willy,,,,, 12 12oz. PBR's are equal to 144 oz. 144/16=9# Add a couple pounds o' ice and give a couple pounds for the weight of the cooler and that'll tip the scales at somewhere near 15#. Now we all know that is peak weight. Also figger the weight xfer from the rear to the operators seat, then the weight of the can removed after tossin it to the appropriate container. After a few hours consideration must taken for the offload of fluids and the rejoovinatin of the cooler. And the cycle repeatts itself throughout the day.sm00sm00:D:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
B10Dave
sm00 Tim; your equation is much to complicated. The simple solution is to drink contents of cooler and do the plowing tomorrow. And we all know tomorrow never comes.:D Dave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    • tadams
    • MARK (LI)
    • s_stephen
    • BLT
    • smalljob
    • PhanDad
    • RWB78
  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Recent Status Updates

    • dav-1

      dav-1  »  Talntedmrgreen

        Over a year ago, you answered a question I had about the tool bar for my FDT. In your reply dated Dec 31, 2019  you said the spacer, part #16, goes in the bar to allow for up and down depth adjustment. does this mean the bolt has to be tightened at whatever depth desired or does the bolt slide up and down, allowing the lower hitch to free float?
         If it is tightened so the lower hitch and the bar are rigid, then is the depth to be controlled by the shoes? Or by the lift handle?
        Is there any kind of user directions for the tool bar? The Outdoor Power Manual basically shows how to assemble the bar but not how to use it
      · 1 reply
    • tribswede

      tribswede  »  goatfarmer

      ISO a deck for a 6516 H and all the connecting hardware any ideas on where to start?
       
      · 1 reply
  • Adverts

×