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PatterBrian

Installing chains

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PatterBrian
I tried for about half an hour, and couldn't get a set of chains on my wheels on the tractor. I took the wheels off, and got the chains on fairly easily, but not completely tight. On side slipped half off when I plowed. Can somebody post a note on how to install chains, please. I have two sets of 4 link chains. one is longer and narrowed, and only wraps about 3" down the sidewall of the tire. The other is set is shorter and wider, and probably comes about 5" down the sidewall. One of these has no fastener, and the PO used a bolt between the end links. If I use this set, is it possible to attach a new fastener? Which set seems like a better bet for plowing?

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gomez1
Most of the time you have to use some type of devise to keep the chains from rolling off the sides of the tires.You can use a chain tensioner or most people use short tarp straps.Use them on the outside and inside of the wheel. Bill

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johnmonkey
I place the chains on the ground and roll the tractor over the chains. I then clip the chain hook. Sometimes I let out some air pressure for a better fit and re-fill the air when done. I tie baling wire around the chain hook so it doesn't come unhooked. I use either bungee cords or strips of cut up inner tube to place tension on the side of chains ( I try to attach the bungee in three places around the tire). As mentioned tie the rubber on the inside and outside of the tire. Good luck, JH

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Zach
try letting the air out of the tire and putting the chains on. then inflate the tire. thats what i have done for years and it works like a charm. i don't use bungee cords or wire or anything like that to keep them tight, looks sloppy i think.

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rfsmith1952
Letting some air out is great if you have a compressor handy. I put them on like John does, lay them out, push the tractor on the chains. I use four small rubber bungees on each wheel. Two inside, and two outside. The outside ones you can "X" The inside ones you must parallel because of the axle. I came across this method after the chains fell off about four or five times. Also: Keep the air pressure a bit low and you'll get better traction. You'll get it, just keep experimenting till they stay on. I'd like to try the liquid windshield washer thing I've read about here, but I don't know how to do that.

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timflury
I'll put up some pictures on Thursday morning of my setup. I use a bungee cord to maintain tension on the chain. Bob, there are many clips on youtube regarding filling of tires. When you decide to do so, use the -20 fluid. It won't freeze in the tire.


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locknut
quote:
Originally posted by rfsmith1952
Letting some air out is great if you have a compressor handy. I put them on like John does, lay them out, push the tractor on the chains. I use four small rubber bungees on each wheel. Two inside, and two outside. The outside ones you can "X" The inside ones you must parallel because of the axle. I came across this method after the chains fell off about four or five times. Also: Keep the air pressure a bit low and you'll get better traction. You'll get it, just keep experimenting till they stay on. I'd like to try the liquid windshield washer thing I've read about here, but I don't know how to do that.
Find some cheap -20deg washer fluid and take the wheels to a tire store.They can break the top bead and just pour it in and air them back up.Shoudn't cost much.23-1050-12 tires hold around 6 gal each. Which reminds me of a funny story on my first tire fill project.Bought some 489 XT 6plys to put on a Landlord and they were mashed flat from storage.The tire store had an awful time airing them up with that fluid.They blew washer fluid all over that place and themselves.Glad I bought the tires from them.

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Vassal
Someone here did a great story that showed various differences in chain fitment due to differences in tires and chains. Unfortunately, I could not find that thread using the search function, but the moral of the story is that it's all too easy to end up with a less than ideal set up unless you have a mountain of chains on hand to choose from. If you look at this picture I think it shows what some are talking about, where you take up the slack with bungee cords or whatever. Of course this will work fine, but as you can see, no amount of tire inflation will fix this, so that's not an end all for this problem:
[img]http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/attach/Architectdave/IMG_0489.jpg[/img]
(sorry Dave, not trying to pick on you, your pic was only a few clicks away sm06) You can see in Dave's scenario, the chains look to be way too LONG for the size of the tire, evidenced by the drooping link at the sidewall. But are they really? They also look a little too WIDE too, (one link maybe?) so that compounds the problem, but it works right? I'm very lucky to have chains that are almost perfect in width but a touch too SHORT for my tires, which turns out to be a a perfect fit really. I just let some air out of the tires and wrestle with them a little, then they're on for good after I air back up (no pics sorry, but I can take some tomorrow if you want).

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Vassal
Almost forgot.... Way back when, Bob (BLT) gives us a good hint to figure out which chain length should fit which tire: "Divide those chain lentghs by 3.1416 and that will give you the approx diameter of the tire." Easy as pie (ouch - sorry).

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jmhusby
Way I like to put mine on is to jack the back up and drap the chain over the tire and hook the inside first dropping the links that seem to work and hook the outside not tightening it. Then spin the wheel adjusting the chain for better fit. Use a bungee cord to take up a little slack. Don't like the looks of the cord but it sure beats being out in a snowbank messing with the darn things.:o)PatterBrian should put the fastener on the one set of chains, will make it easier to work with.

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MPH
As bungee cords loose their bungee in my cold winter years ago I went to letting the air out of the tires, put the chains on tight then reinflate. Have never lost a chain and I don't always plow on a nice driveway. I jack up the tractor to put them on.

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steve-wis
My tire chains have the fasteners that go thru the chain link and then fold back, tightening the chain, and then hook onto the chain to hold it. I jack up the tractor and put the chain on the tire, then hook the inside fastener. Then I hook the outside one so it is snug and rotate the tire, re-adjusting the chain as it spins. After a bit of this, I re-hook the outside. If the fastener goes thru the link and folds back easily, I move one link tighter. When I can't fold it back by hand, I use large pliers to fold it back and hook it. Then a tie-wrap to hold the hanging ends so they don't slap. I have never lost a chain when put on this way. Wish I had a couple of pics, but hopefully you know what I am describing. Funny thing is this year I am running ag tires and going without chains, which is the easiest way to deal with chains! Steve

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