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Kenzen

Ag tires on front, installed backwards?

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Kenzen
I'm in need of new front tires on my DA917H - dry rot. I've got Ag tires on the rear, filled with windshield washing fluid, since I have a good amount of hills in my back yard that the original turf tires would slip on - the rear Ag tires work great - no regrets putting them on. However, particularly while plowing snow, my front tires become almost useless in turning the tractor. I seem to remember reading somewhere that someone put Ag tires on the front of a 2WD tractor, but reversed them (i.e. didn't follow the proper rotation markings) so they got better steering traction in snow or mud. This seems to make sense, especially if it's helped with some weight as well. Can anyone provide some guidance/feedback on this? Thx, Ken

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timflury
Tractor tires with chevron treads show the same idea. Imagine your back tire spinning in water (or mud)...you want the water that gets grabbed by the slots to naturally be forced to the outside of the tire while it is spinning. For that to happen, the "point" of the chevron should be pointed to the rear of the bike where the tire contacts the ground, with the "wings" of the chevron spreading towards the front of the bike. The front tire is not powered (unless it is a Track:-) so the only force is a braking force, so the tread pattern must be reversed to produce the desired effect...essentially like the tire is driving in the opposite direction. We see this all the time on combines with treaded rear tires, which are installed the opposite way to the drive tires. It doesn't look as good, but it works the way it is supposed to. Dunlop and the others were correct. I copied and pasted the paragraph above from a motorcycle themed message board. The only difference here is the fact that the front wheels on our tractors have no brakes.

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rokon2813
By mounting them backward, the outside "points" actually hit the ground first. This makes steering much better in snow and mud. Many of the chevron type tires say right on them mount one way for traction, opposite for steering. I have one tractor (B 12) with them on year around, wouldn't change a thing.

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HubbardRA
In my opinion it has more to do with the location of the tread bars when turning. You want the bar that is on the side of the tire where the force needs to be applied to effect the turn to be situated with its long side crossways to oppose the force. When they are the same as the rear, the lug is pointing more toward where the force needs to be instead of crossways. Tri-ribs are used on large tractors because their ribs are always crossways to the force applied when turning. I would go with tri-ribs instead of traction lug tires, if it were me. If I did use the traction lug tires, then I would mount them opposite to the ones on the rear. My 2WD FEL came with lugs on all four wheels. The front ones are mounted opposite to the rear.

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acfarmer
I've tried traction tires both ways on the front and like to mount them the same as the rear ones would be mounted.Conversely on my 4WD Loader I mounted them in reverse on the front as its very difficult to back out of holes some times also when scooping up something like gravel the front end usually comes up anyway and the rear tires do most all the work.

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