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johnmonkey

Hot Bearings

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johnmonkey
I just replaced two of three sets of fafnir bearings in my 1963 mongomery ward gardenmark squire mower deck (same AC B-1 & Simp 725). The two replaced bearings are running hotter than the bearing that I did not replace.Is this normal "breaking in" of the bearings or do you think they were installed inncorrectly? I did not press the bearings in, I tapped them in using the back of a large socket wrench. I also thought that the belt was too tight and I loosened it up but the bearings were still running hotter than the un-replaced bearing....??? any comments? PS thanks to Sandy Lake equipment for their having all the parts needed.

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Rico
I’m just curious, how do know the new bearings are running hotter..? With the arbors completely assembled, spin the blades by hand. If they spin freely and smoothly without noise, I wouldn’t worry about anything. If there is any sign of binding, I would try reseating the bearings. If you try to remove the bearings, you risk damaging them. Did you roll the shafts on a flat surface to make sure they weren’t bent..? Using the back of a socket probably didn’t hurt anything, but next time use the other side of the socket so you only contact the outer bearing race. Any tapping on the inner race could cause bearing damage.

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johnmonkey
The one un-replaced set of bearings was cooler to the touch (not real scientific but it works). I did pre-spin the bearings and they did spin freely w/o any noise. The center shaft was replaced brand new and I assume that both were not bent. I did mean to say that I used the front of the socket only touching the outer rim of the bearing. I guess the bottom line is keep on mowing and not worry! Thanks for your help. John

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dymondclay
Hey there, Dumb question but... Did you grease the housings back up after you replaced the bearings? Somebody on here mentioned that even though the newer style bearings are sealed, they still need the grease to keep them cool. Hope this helps, Good luck, Clayton

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MikeES
You may just have bad bearings (just because they say Fafnir doesn't mean they are not from India or someplace>>outsourcing<<). I replaced all bearings (noisy) on my deck a few years ago and in 3 weeks I put the old ones back in (4 out of the 6 new ones failed). At work we no longer change out bearings on PM or overhauls, we replace at failure or vibration analysis. We had way too many "new" bearing failures. You can usually tell a good bearing by "mic-ing" the inside and outside race. The cheap bearings are rarely in tolerance, and gives you a window on how they are built inside. Mike S.

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johnmonkey
Yes, I did regrease the housings I'm still not sure on how much grease should be placed in the housing, I normally put in about 25 "pumps" of grease from a small grease gun. Even with that many "pumps" grease still does not come out of the housing. Thanks for your help, John. P.S. I can't wait for a new hat!!

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Al
Hi, The early arbor tubes had grease fittings, and the bearings only had seals in one side. People tended to overgrease the bearings and push the seals out and all the grease fell out on the ground and the bearings fell out next. If the owners would only put in about 1 or 2 pumps a year the bearings lasted forever. The solution was to put in sealed bearings and remove the grease fittings. They lasted longer than the overgreased bearings, but not nearly as long as the "properly" greased 1 seal bearings. When the bearings are installed the bottom bearing needs to be able to move in the arbor tube. Not loose, but not fit so tight that it can't move to prevent excessive side thrust on the bearings when the stack is tightened. It is important to Clean the area outside the bottom bearing with sandpaper or emery paper and put some grease or anti-seize in the tube outside the bearing. Side thrust could be causing the heating. Also excessive grease could be pushing the bearings apart causing side thrust or the inner seals may be being pushed into the bearing ball retainers. If those tubes had 1 seal bearings and the tube was about 1/3 full of grease the bearings would never need any more grease as it flies around like crazy in there. In the newer decks with the 2 piece housings, the grease only serves to put a grease layer above the seal on the lower bearing to keep any water that gets in the housing from getting into the bearings. Many times the lower bearing runs with water standing on it otherwise. We tell every one that buys a new tractor to only give the arbors 1 or 2 pumps of grease once a year. Too much and the bearing seals get pushed into the bearing and the arbor housings get buckled apart and grease ends under the deck covers and on the spindle belt. What a mess to clean up. Good luck, Al E

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