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RayS

Sleeve Hitch (Done)

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RayS


Looking to make one. I have made on in the past and sold my original to check out and to use for a reference. Kind of got it in my head that I want a moldboard plow. I have always ended up selling in the past and have no idea why I need one. I have a 36" tiller and a 38" heavy duty. My question is for anyone that has one is, can you measure the diameter of the hole that the pin for the plow goes through on the sleeve hitch. Dutch`s drawing says 5/8" but when looking up the parts numbers on Jacks it says that the pin is .490" and if that is true then the hole only needs to be .500" or 1/2 inch. Any help would be appreciated. Cutting up the steel after work and probably will make a few extras.

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RayS
How do you determine a 8" plow from a 10" Brinly plow? Where do you measure from? I know that the plow in picture has the wrong hitch. Just using it as a reference to determine how to measure it.


Thanks

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timflury
Ray, Measure the plow from the landslide, (pictured) to the widest point on the bottom of the share. In your picture it would be the bottom most point. You are measuring from left to right on the plow bottom. Your furrow will be 10" wide and the ideal depth will be half that. The length of the "C" channel on my plow is 3 1/2" The length of the pipe on the hitch should obviously be less. 3 3/8" should be correct.




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Talntedmrgreen
When I fabbed my sleeve hitch, I took a few liberties with the dimensions. My homebuilt hitch is a bit longer than Dutch's, and the cross bar is moved toward the pin hole by quite a bit. It allows me to leave my ball hitch on the tractor when using the sleeve becuase I found myself going back and forth during gardening in the spring, when we're also doing the tpys and trailer shuffle in the barn. (sleds, boats, utility trailers, etc)When I fabbed my sleeve hitch, I took a few liberties with the dimensions. My homebuilt hitch is a bit longer than Dutch's, and the cross bar is moved toward the pin hole by quite a bit. It allows me to leave my lower mount ball hitch on the tractor when using the sleeve because I found myself going back and forth during gardening in the spring, when we're also doing the toys and trailer shuffle in the barn. (sleds, boats, utility trailers, etc) My pin is 1/2"...my pin sleeve is 5/8". As far as plows go, I like pulling a 10" best for turning dirt with my 10 horse machines, but for virgin ground I use an 8". That 8" really cuts tough stuff, and even knives its way through considerable sized treeroots. I can run it on the deep side and have gotten very nice results. Problem is, the furrow is narrow enough that the sod will often times fall back over, which is a pain if you intended to leave it turned for fall & winter before tilling in the spring. I sold my 10" and am looking for one again. The 8" is handy, but I think I have my virgin ground days behind me, so I'm thinking it will see limited use.

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RayS
"I sold my 10" and am looking for one again. The 8" is handy, but I think I have my virgin ground days behind me, so I'm thinking it will see limited use." That is my issue as well. I really don`t need it since I have the two tillers. I am bored though so I probably will make the sleeve hitch this week and post pictures. Last plow I owned I kept banging my knee into.

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Talntedmrgreen
They take a bite out of knees, that's for sure. Something about pulling one thought the ground though...dunno...just fun, I suppose! =] I got a freebie factory sleeve hitch a few weeks back but have never put a tape to it to measure anything. I can tell you, it's much heavier thatn the one I built out of scrap I had, and that thing has taken a serious beating! The factory version should never, ever break or bend.

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timflury
Ray, I use my plow more for others than I do for myself. My garden is 12'x20'. Mulch is plowed under during November and it takes me about 15 minutes start to finish. My dad's garden is about 100' square and it takes about 1 1/2 hour. I attended plow day at Homesteader's farm, and at Racine Grain for the SE Wi. Antique Power Society. I actually had a customer that needed to break sod in the spring. That 12'x50' garden took almost two hours to plow and till. The customers mother, a retired farmer, had never seen a plow on the back of a garden tractor. I agree, it isn't an attachment that sees a lot of use like a mower or a snowblower, but the plow draws a lot of attention and conversation at the shows. I'm even considering putting an ad in the local paper in the spring for garden starting and tilling. Of course the customer needs to call Digger's Hotline first before I sink anything into the ground.

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Talntedmrgreen
We have a handful of guys around here that put out CL ads for garden work, but most list small CUT's as their tool of choice. I've done a couple gardens for others, but now have those friends set up with their own Simp's and plows =] That 8" works nicely for laying underground sprinkling line or to run a power line out to the polebarn too...

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RayS


Anybody have demensions on ref. 10 the stabilizer plate? I know the thickness is 7ga. I see it is still available but have the steel to make it. I see ref. 11 hitch or (clevis assembly)is NLA part number 1675373 or atleast that is what Jacks site states.

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HubbardRA
Ray, That stabilizer plate should be fitted to the plow so that it fits tightly against the front surface of the beam, because it is used to hold the plow steady and not let it move to the side. I made my own hitch, like you did, then I mounted the plow and measured the distance needed for the plate to fit the plow as it should. I then made the plate. Since mine is all hand fitted, the dimensions from mine may not fit yours. I suggest that you mount the plow and then measure like I did.

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timflury
Take a look at my "old style" hitch Ray. I welded nuts to the inside of the hitch as well. They are 5/8x11. For plowing, I'm not exactly sure what the purpose of the stabilizer is for. Brinly recommends that the plow be allowed to sway. I can see the piece being needed if you are going to attach a disc harrow or cultivator to help reduce a sway when lifted.


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HubbardRA
Interesting to see that when we build these hitches, we each do it a little differently. When I built mine, the only steel I had available was angle iron, other than a few small pieces of flatbar. Here is a picture of it:


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timflury
You did a nice job on yours too, Ray.dOddOd I must digress, mine is actually a rebuild. When I bought mine with the plow, the welds on it were very poor. I simply cut it up, ground down the boogers and welded it back together.

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Talntedmrgreen
Very Nice Ray! That one there is a beauty! Rod, I had always heard the plow was not supposed to be tightly fit, and that it was supposed to sway and be free to move around obstacles. I know mine has hopped to the sode a few times when hitting a big root or rock...figured it was saving my machine from some stress.

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HubbardRA
Josh, I don't try to set mine completely rigid. I just want it to stay straight enough that it will sit down directly behind the tractor when I come around for each pass. I first tried without the plate, and it became apparent that I either needed the plate or I needed someone to hold the plow straight till I got it pulled into the ground. Without the plate, every time I lifted the plow it would flop over to one side. In the areas that I am plowing, I don't have much room to move around at the end of the gardens. I need the plow to start turning dirt at the right place within a foot or two. The plate really helps with this.

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timflury
Very interesting Rod. I lift my plow as opposed to lifting the hitch adapter. "Old style hitch adapter". So with that, the plow hangs nicely behind the tractor. Along with Josh's reasoning, the plow should sway in case you would need to plow around something or to make an arc or corner with the plow in the ground.

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