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Steve72

Good Weekend to Work

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Steve72
OK--so maybe it wasn't really work---but anytime I get an excuse to fire up Alice---I take it. Lumber is for a "goat shack" that my wife had been wanting for awhile that I was finally able to complete this weekend.



But not without damage---Alice gets her first big scratch since the restore about a month ago---crap. Not sure how to fix it without a big sand and repaint.



Greg Pointon if you are seeing this--here is the shot of the headlite bracket you requested--sorry it took so long--also think you do really nice work on all your projects!! Motivating for me! Bracket is 3/4" x 1/4" thick flat stock.



My workshop, with Alice hooked to my 1911 Reeves 2hp gas engine that I restored last year and use to churn homemade ice-cream with. Just love to listen to it run--very relaxing---like a grandfather clock ticking. On the shop porch is a 1940 Onan generator that runs great and will be a good restore project!





Momma is happy now---a good warm home for her new weed eaters!! Have a great Thanksgiving everyone!!


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GLPointon
Thanks for the headlight info... You have a great looking place too! Scratch-Ouch! I've put masking tape on both sides of the scratch as close as possible to only leave the "paintless" area exposed. then shoot some paint in the lid of the spray can and apply with a Q-tip or artist's brush. (several coats- till its level) Not as good as a sand/repaint but alot easier for "workers" that we want to keep lookin good. Again, nice place & awsome Tractor...sm01

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comet66
Great looking tractor, but if you intend to keep working it, just touch it up. Otherwise it will be a constant source of annoyance. Or.....just get another tractor to be your worker. :D Nice place to.

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Steve72
Thanks! I like GL's idea of masking off the area---so I'll give that a shot first. The story? My wife set up a ladder--in a 20mph wind---that toppled over and hit the fender. Yes I was a bit ticked---but she felt really bad so I bit my tongue and shunned her for a couple hours till I was over it. I have to try and fix it--just in a bad place that really stands out.

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larry8200
Nice tractor and pictures! I paint a section of my 74 Sovereign every year to keep it looking sharp, left frame and runningboards this year, Hood and decals last year, never ends but I could never stop working the old girl either. :D


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dentwizz
The way we touch up single stage stuff in automotive is to wet sand the area lightly to un-edge it(not to be confused with stripping it down). 1000-1500 grit is fine. Then brush or spray a wet coat, not enough to run but enough to seal the edges and look good. It may take a couple coats depending on paint brand. Once it is cured thoroughly(may take weeks) then blend sand it with the same super fine grit to take the edge and orange peel off. Polish with compound til shiny and call it a tractor8D:D Even with a scratch its stil HOT;)

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Steve72
MPH---yes the axle supports are also oak as is the tongue. I built this originally to haul logs/beams around when I was into timberframing barns. I have stacked this little trailer full of firewood (using sideboards)and am suprised at how strong the oak is. The large chisel I'm using on the treated posts is called a "slick" and works really nice---even in hardwoods---when sharp.


Dark--what do you mean club sticker?

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Ken
I would do as GL said. If after you are done building the scratch up with paint and it isn't as smooth as you'd like you can always use very fine wet sand paper to sand the paint you added to make it smooth and then buff it out. I have done this many times and you can't even tell it was ever scratched.

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HubbardRA
I learned many years ago how to touch up a scratch on a work machine. I have sure had plenty to practice on. No tapeing. I just spray the paint into the cap as Greg said, then I use a toothpick or just a sharpened stick to pick up a drop of paint, and drop by drop will fill only the scratch with paint. Make sure the sharpened point of the toothpick is smaller than the width of the scratch. Fill it all the way to the top of the scratch or just a little extra. On large scratches, you may need to apply a second coat to get sufficient buildup in the scratch. When it is completely cured, it can be worked down even with fine sandpaper and rubbing compound, or just left that way, since you have to look closely to see the touch up. Been doing that for the past 50 years and it works fine for me. It also works great with paint chips on an automobile. Just a drop or two in the chipped out area and you are good to go. This way you do not have to mess with the surrounding painted area. Quick and easy.

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