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MPH

Manual Lift Needed--More "fun"

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MPH
or warmer winters. Lift got real slow after about half an hour of plowing out my drifted in driveway. Couple drifts were about 18 inches, but were too far from the front door to walk for a picture, and it's been down to -45 for 3 days since the wind blew them in, I was in Anchorage working on a house my daughter is buying, so the snow had a good chance to freeze in hard. Was VERY happy the '64 could move them as the B-112 is still in the leanto with no battery in it and 200 feet from a plug in to warm the ole briggs up.


Mt Sanford and Drum come into view about 70 miles west of GlennAllen on the way home, love it during sunset.


Still about 40 miles out


Got to GlennAllen after the color was gone, bummer. Warmed up to 20 below today so decided to get the B-112 into the shop, first step, power to warm it up.


200 feet of cord later and a couple old quits


Fresh battery off the charger and it did fire up, though not quickly after 3 hours of the oil pan heater plugged in. Planned on blowing my way out but as the belt was off the pulley I ddn't want to shut it down so I plowed it out with the landlord, it's now warming for the nite before I check it all out.

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Talntedmrgreen
Dang, that's cold! I like playin in the snow, but your winter has much more bite than mine B) Is your lift slow because of the cold and the fluid, or is it a leaky piston seal? My B110 got slow, and the blade would plop right back down to the ground last winter. I used a stinger and doughnut to help me through till spring (plowin most every day), and then threw in new piston seals...good as new! Can't wait to see more of your adventures up there. The wife and I are looking into a vacation for our anniversary, and Alaska is where I want to visit someday...too beautiful too miss. ;)

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perry
after a half hour it should have been warmed up. but dang, them are some cold temps. check that cylinder and also check the tension on the pump belt. i guess i coul trade you a manual lift for the hydro....:p

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RickS
According to google maps it is 4,205 miles. Google estimates the travel time at 3 days and 9 hours. But with Marty driving I think he could shave several hours off that estimate. Can you say Road Trip! Rick.........

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GLPointon
There is a hydraulic fluid called "Areo-shell". It was designed for the Airline hydro systems in the wings, flaps, tail, etc where temps are sub-zero too. We use it at work in our bucket trucks hydraulic systems...Its a bit pricey but will not thicken due to cold...sm01

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timflury
quote:
Originally posted by RayS
Would synthetic help the lift?
I'm thinking the same thing. You're going to need to find the thinnest oil as possible to work in the extreme cold. a straight 10 weight or like 0w-20 synthetic might help. I also have an armstrong lift that I could send you for cheep.

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MPH
It's the oil getting cold that does it. It gets slower on a long run like from the shop door to the road, maybe 400 feet, then it does when using it more. Since these systems use 10-30 motor oil I should try some AmsOil in the lift too. Normally I don't plow when it's that cold, just ain't o fun. But I was gone for a week.

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Talntedmrgreen
I cannot imagine much is fun in that cold. Coldest I've been in was -32, on a snowmobiling trip. It was pure agony. Hardly anything would function correctly...had throttle cables shapping, air vents and helmet vents ducktaped. Plus, it's hard to stop for a pee break when you can't take your gloves off. :( We had to load up to leave in that weather, and the bumper cover on my truck shattered like glass when I stepped on it to load gear in the back of the truck. Since we're talking fluids and cold temps, what should a guy stay away from if I'm looking to change loader fluid for better/faster performance when it's cold? The book says 10SAE for cold temps and 20SEA for warm temps. I'm using 5W-20 and the B-1 loader will barely drop under it's own weight when it's below 30 degrees. I've seen the same issue ith the hydrolift, but only when we get closer to zero. Never did know what was kosher for these older pumps.

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GLPointon
I think the motor oil used as hydro fluid in our tractors was simply as a conveniance so we wouldnt need two types of oils to maintain...But if you drained the motor oil you can switch to Areo-shell or a Dextron type hydro oil with no trouble. The only disadvantage is thinner oils will slip past the seals more than thicker oils...sm01

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Vassal
quote:
Originally posted by PGL
In your first picture is that a bare thumb/finger holding the thermometer? ....
Aw, heck, Marty don't switch from shorts to long pants until it starts to stay below zero! I don't have hydrolift, but I agree with the idea of using ATF. Synthetic or otherwise, it seems like it would do a whole lot better in the deep freeze.

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Dark
we sometimes get the high wind and low temps here in Nebraska (think ASKA on the end means snow ) lol, but some of the farmers use a veggie oil fluid for the loaders and bobcats seems to work well in hot or cold. example...[url]http://www.hydrosafe.com/index.htm[/url]

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