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tobski

little bove 80lbs after 3 compression strokes

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tobski
I tried searching previos posts and resources, I'm sure this has come up before, I have a tractor I bought without knowing how it runs, ..I did a compression check on the stripped out helicoiled head and got abot 80 after 3 revs with the starter/gen. In the past the engines I thought were supposed to be between 90-125 lbs if the were considered pretty good. ...My question was is this a pretty good cmpression reading for these older engines?,or am I out in left field in a snowbank, I plan on probably buying a new head, etc..

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BLT
You could get a few more PSI with a gear starter as it spins the engine faster the SG. Briggs don't give a value and this is their official statement. http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/attach/BLT/BriggsCompressionSml.jpg People will chirp in and say that is the low end. But keep this in mind, if it starts fine, doesn't emit any blue smoke worth mentioning, little or no oil consumption, does your chores without complaining, run it.^

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tobski
Thanks for the reply, I never knew Briggs printed that info about compression testing, I once had a Honda and was given that info in a rebuilding manual...I agree with you that If I can get it to go and does what you said, I'm going to leave it..Thanks

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RayS
I have two new or super low hour 16hp Briggs. One has 12 hours and the other with 75 hours. They both run between 95-100 psi. I think because of the easy spin - pressure release that is built into the cam is the reason for those readings. I never tested them when motor was hot. Only cold readings. Not really sure which is way is the proper way of checking.

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timflury
A 243431 is also an "easy spin" engine. I'm in agreement with Bob. If it runs, with little or no smoke, then run it. You can do some further investigation by popping off the cylinder head and squirting some oil around the edge of the piston and repeating your compression test. If your results increase, then the rings will be worn, if not, then you have a leaky valve.

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Buickgsman
Also, you may find the compression goes up after it runs a bit due to the oil maybe loosening up the rings and getting them to seat where they need to. I had the same issue with my Big Ten.. like 30 PSI until i started it and ran mint no smoke no reason to even think twice about it. Start it up and see what happens. Bob

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ReedS
When you replace the head you can at least give the jug a visual inspection, as long as there isn't any obvious scoring or heavy rust, I would do as suggested and run it! I've had some scary looking engines that run just fine with a little TLC! Also if you haven't done so and it's been sitting for while you should check to make there are no resident rodents (past or present) in the blower shroud! This is a common affliction on these engines, a large nest will compromise the proper airflow needed to keep the jug cool and result in overheating which leads to an eventual overhaul!

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