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OrangeMetalGuy

Oil temp gauge on single-cylinder Kohler?

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OrangeMetalGuy
On one of the other sites there's a posting by a guy who installed an oil temp gauge on an air-cooled Legacy. I've always wanted an oil temp gauge, is there a plug in the block that could be used to install one on a Kohler K341 16HP engine in my 716H?

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BLT
Air cooled engines do not have a regulated cooling systems, so oil temperature readings would be all over the board causing headaches for the dealers. Also there isn't any room in the sump to install one that I am aware of. It's like trying to get an air temperature reading off an engine also. The temperature varies with load. I am sure factories have values but won't release anything for that reason.

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rokon2813
quote:
Originally posted by BLT
Air cooled engines do not have a regulated cooling systems, so oil temperature readings would be all over the board causing headaches for the dealers. Also there isn't any room in the sump to install one that I am aware of. It's like trying to get an air temperature reading off an engine also. The temperature varies with load. I am sure factories have values but won't release anything for that reason.
What Bob said :D But if you really gotta have one just to say you got one, you could put a "T" in your drain plug hole. :O

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sammiefish
I read the article also. I think comments are spot on with the variability of readings... the author briefly touched on that subject... also just mentioning that somewhere he had a spec that an oil cooler would keep the oil 40 degrees cooler... and that was also his experience.... I suppose it could be of value should you know your normal ranges in "normal" load conditions... On my AC K-series I dont think there is an unused additional drain plug as there was in the legacy project... but for a $9 investment in parts.. .it seemed fun

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BLT
quote:
Originally posted by sammiefish
On my AC K-series I dont think there is an unused additional drain plug as there was in the legacy project... but for a $9 investment in parts.. .it seemed fun
Kinda like a 6' whip antenna and a coon tail tied to the top, makes ya feel good.:D:D

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427435
Actually, that sounds like a good idea. It would let you know when the fins needed a cleaning. In the old days of air-cooled snowmobiles, you could buy a thermocouple that went under the sparkplug and give you the head temp.

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1Litre
That 16 Kohler has a wide base block when used in Simplicity/Allis versions. It has flanges on both sides at the base where the pan is bolted on. Some versions had a pipe thread hole in the center of the flange to install a filler/dip stick with a short length of pipe nipple on the side with the starter. Most are not drilled and tapped but some are. You could easily place it there. You could drill and tap the area yourself but the engine would have to be removed to clean all the metal cuttings out. I would be more concerned on keeping the top of the motor cool. Clean out the finned areas and the screen on the flywheel . Change the oil as recomended with the proper grade of quality oil and keep the air filter clean.She will run a long time then. Even the most expensive quart of oil is way less expensive as parts and labor. Good Luck Ken

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MysTiK
Just a nice idea? I think an oil filter is required for real usefulness. And I think 1Litre said it all. :(! (my useless angry RANT) I find that "enforced friendliness sites" have a lot of "enforced nice ideas" that really don't work in real life, and have no place in the real world that I occupy. and I have no place in their world. sometimes I get angry and sometimes a spade is a spade. hence banned forever, no reason. dress that up with coolers and whip antennae and air conditioning and mudflaps and 4way stereo and raccoon tails, and a flying swan hood ornament, as you wish. a spade is still a spade. and "a rose is a rose is a rose, by any other name" (Perls). but under "enforced friendliness", there's no place for half of reality. read between the lines. that site stepped on me a couple years ago. and now they send me "friendly inviting newsletters" to salt the rage. (obviously, some others got the same email) (hey, they are a business). so, yes, I told them nothing will ever change until they delete their deluded mods. This is the most useless futile post I have ever made here - permission granted to delete it. or if anyone objects, I will. but thanx for listening. end of trash indulgence and rant. it seems I needed to do this, despite my second thoughts.B) Feels good, kinda almost, to get it out, and be done with it. sm00 Thx to BLT for the reality check. As for my anger, sm01 it's not at anyone here, but it is all mine. :D my personal power is not tolerated in their socalled "friendly" world. As for this OUR site HERE, I love it cos it's real. dOd and I thank you all for that. beware insanity - it is highly contagious. it knows no bounds. (sigh) Peace. crk8

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sammiefish
quote:
Originally posted by 1Litre
That 16 Kohler has a wide base block when used in Simplicity/Allis versions. It has flanges on both sides at the base where the pan is bolted on. Some versions had a pipe thread hole in the center of the flange to install a filler/dip stick with a short length of pipe nipple on the side with the starter......
As found on MF-16... you'll notice where the dipstick is placed on AC the hole in the block is not there


or as found on my NOS shortblock, when I installed this I used a threaded plug to plug the hole... as was said this would be a nice place for temp sensor


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Al
Hi, A pyrometer with the thermocouple under the spark plug would provide more information than an oil temp gauge. When we do the temp testing of our kits for Kohler sign off, we have thermocouples under the spark plugs, 4 thermocouples at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o-clock 1/2 inch back and 1/2 inch in from the blower intake. 1 thermocouple in the crankcase near the oil pump pickup for oil temp. They don't use the crankcase holes because a large portion of an air cooled engines cooling is transfer of heat though the crank case walls. Hence the ribs in the new castings and bases on the new generation engines. When you use a drain hole for the oil sensor the sump reduces the oil temp. Maybe less so on a dipper engine, but this is why we use oil pump pick up temp. Then a thermocouple in the float bowl of the carb and 1 in the venturi. 2 on the bottom of the hood. The muffler pipes have a tap welded into a straight portion of the pipe as close to 1 inch from the head as possible. These are connected to 2 manometers to monitor back pressure at each cylinder. If back pressure spec is exceeded it throws the emissions out of spec. This qualifies for a 34500.00 fine for every one you sell, if the EPA finds out about it. When have our mufflers made, the first 3 we back pressure test with the largest engine we will use and run for 30 minutes wide open full load on a dyno. When we got our first 3 samples for our JD 318 kits, one of the 3 was out on 1 cyl. we cut it open and found the problem. Contacting our mfr, we made a correction so it won't happen in future production. This is a 3 hour temp run on the dyno in a "hot room". A rep for Kohler comes in and takes the readings. If we pass it we can sell our kits any place in the world and not have to worry that an engine failure can result in a refused warranty with the engine mfr saying contact the people that built the kit. They have heat recirculation or other cooling problems. Now that you asked what time was and I got carried away and tried to tell you how to build a watch. Sorry. To sum it up, head temp would provide more valuable info. Al Eden

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Al
Bob, They like 110 degrees, but have programs that can correct from lower temps and we used 80 degrees. they are comfortable with that as long as we keep the temps constant. I might add that on the last one, we did the 25 hp Sun Star in the morning and the 25 John Deere 400 in the after noon and the dyno only had 30 gallons of oil in the oil tank. By the time I was done with the Deere, the oil temp in the dyno tank was at 185 degrees when we finished the 2nd tractor. We had fans blowing on it but had to keep going. I am building a new dyno with a 58 gallon oil tank. We have plumbed 6 feet of the finned copper tubing out of hot water base board heating registers. I have a pipe with a number of holes in the sides for the return oil to de areate, then a divider in the tank with exchange holes in the bottom of the tank for the oil to transfer to the input to the pump side. This will keep the pump from sucking areated oil, Then I can use water running through the registers to cool the oil. I would expect that when we start messing around with these new 40hp engines we will need it. Right now I am using a right angle gear case from a Yamaha motorcycle to go from the driveshaft from the tractor to the pump. I have a kind of cobbled up seal in it and have 2 Sun Star deck gear boxes I am going to use in the future. I have a pump that I can turn the flow down and could kill a 40hp dead. My other dyno might not be able to do that. The front pto of the Sun Star and the 400 Deere both used the same drive shaft. I have to now make a shaft drive PTO for the 318 and then I can just put the front wheels in the pads and hook the driveshaft up and I will be ready to go. BTW. I still want to get up to see one of those fire belching big diesels you work with. Would take a[img]/club2//attach/UCD/censored1.gif[/img]of a dyno to kill that. Al Eden

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