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davidmoll

6216 front tires

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davidmoll
The front tires on my 6216 are shot (minimal tread and warped) Can anyone direct me or provide instructions on how to remove tires from the rim and putting new ones on without ruining the tube. Also looking to purchase them? Also looking for used left and right spindles. Mine are worn. Any help, guidance would be appreciated. Thanks Moleman

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arnoldir
Hey Moleman, I'll take a shot at this for ya. Best investment is a pair of Lawn and Garden sized tire irons from Northern Tool or Harbor Freight. About 16" long, with a straight shank and spoon on one end, and a half moon curve and spoon on the other. To break down the beads, I remove the valve core and place wheel assembly on ground under the receiver hitch on my truck. Using a high lift, or standard old bumper jack, place the jack foot on the tire right at the bead and jack up the truck to knock down the bead. Alternately, if feeling lucky and having good aim I use the flat tamping end of a long steel digging bar purchased from Lowes or Home depot to pound down the bead. The key is to break down both sides of the bead, and then use a large C-Clamp or welders clamp to pinch the beads together and nestle them into the deep center of the rim so the opposite side can be pried up over the bead. Remove old tire, clean and rust proof the rim, use soapy water or tire lube on the rim and tire, place rim on ground, put tire on rim starting close to your body. Get bead over rim, put knees on it to hold, then using irons on opposing sides of knee work bead over rim in little bites. The end of iron with inside of half moon curve against the bead works best to reach through tire and engage rim to lever last of tire onto rim. Inflate tube partially and set into tire with valve steam in hole, and wrap a lenght of duct tape around valve steam to prevent it from falling back into tire. You can also drill a hole in a valve cap and put a string with knot on end as a valve stem keeper / retriever. I like to use lots of baby powder on tube to lubricate it. push tube down and start top bead by hand close to body, then pin with knees. Using small bites with irons and using fingers to ensure iron does not catch tube, lever it on. Once you get about 1/2 of top bead on, use the clamp technique to pinch the beads and allow tire to nestle back into deepest part of rim to make slack at opposite end. When I bought my irons, I used a file and then fine sandpaper to round and polish the edges of the spoons to reduce effort and chance of damage to the tube or tire. If you find it impossible to break down the old beads, use sawsall to cut away tire and then cut through the beads. Good luck, and buy and extra tube for your first dance with the irons. Regards

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MysTiK
That's a good explanation. And I used to do much the same with my bicycle tires when I was younger. My dad taught me that. However, buying new tires, I would engage the tire dealer, or a tire shop, to do it for me, for a small charge. A good shop will have a smaller hydraulic tire changer machine for the purpose of dealing with smaller tires. At that point, the discussion moves to whether or not to include tubes, or to only use bead seal instead. Adding tubes to old leaky tires is the other possibility. In the long long run, a tube protected by the heavy rubber of a tire, is close to indestructible with proper inflation. Much of this is personal preference, or, it could be said, doing it yourself is a form of meditation. Same with other tasks. As described above, the worst is getting the last few inches to yield and fall into place. I inflate and deflate tube several times to make sure it doesn't get pinched. And overall one can offset expense vs time and effort vs sense of independence and accomplishment. Hence, personal preference.

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