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rfsmith1952

LED LED Lights-all done- new pix

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rfsmith1952
The work bench is cleaned up, ready for next project: LED headlights. I got two H7 130 led bulbs, and found two black and decker flashlights that I think I can modify the cases and use the reflectors. I think I would mount them on a bar, up high, to use them for blowing and plowing. They should draw very little power while providing a great deal of light. They would be not subject to vibration damage either. We'll see...


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rfsmith1952
I modified one of the flashlights seen in the photo above to accept the H7 led light. It really looks cool when lit, but quite frankly, it doesn't throw much light. I would say you are looking at the equivalent of 25 watts. On the plus side, it draws only about 8 tenths of an amp, and the rubber-covered plastic case would be weather-proof and never rust. Counting the H7 and the flashlight, we're into it for about $16 per light. I'll finish this one and try it at night on the tractor. Might make a good back up light, enough to see but not enough to blind someone behind you.

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rfsmith1952
Got one of the lights cut down and an H7 bulb mounted in the reflector. A hole saw gently widened the bulb hole to accept the H7. Secured it with gaffers tape for now. Prolly needs glue or at least silicon caulking to prevent moisture and fogging.


I removed the center barrel and handle of the flashlight to reduce the size by about 50%. I kept the existing back which has an adjustable leg so you can aim the light.


It's pretty ugly where I removed the handle, but I think some work would improve that.


I used hot glue to re-attach the two pieces, once again, prolly needs to be waterproofed.


Doesn't appear to throw that much light, but last night out in the yard with no ambient light, looked better.


Looks like a UFO comin at you:D
I didn't envision this project as a permanent addition or replacement of the original lights, just a quick and inexpensive add-on for nite ops. Each bulb was about $7 on line and the flashlight was about $7 at WalMart. Each light draws about 8 tenths of an amp, so not much factor on these weak charging systems. I'm thinking of a bar on the back, high up to work over the top of the plow or blower. Maybe three lights, with one facing rearward. Now, to find some way to quickly and inexpensively mount them. Any thoughts, ideas, and possible failure points would be appreciated!

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GLPointon
The cheapest way to make a light duty frame is with galvinized conduit. Like I had to do to adapt the snow cab I found... You would need to make an upright and an angled strut for support. (are you sure you want to mount or drill into that cool tractor though?) sm01

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HubbardRA
I look at the headlights on these tractors a little differently from others. I have never considered the lights to be there to actually work by. Many times I have pushed the envelope and mowed late in the evening till darkness has fallen. I use the lights to sometimes finish up a small area, but most times just to drive back to the shed and to light the shed so I can put the tractor away. We usually do not have huge snows here, so I never feel the need to clear snow at night. I just wait till it quits falling and then clean up the mess next day during daylight. I actually only have one tractor with working headlights. Only time I really feel the need for them on a tractor is when I forget to put the tractor away till after dark, since there are no lights in my hut. I have inside and outside lights around my garage, so I don't need tractor mounted lights there. Bottom line is that if there is enough light to see my way home, I am happy with them. I am not looking to light a football field. I have driven my tractors in the hut many times by hand held flashlight, so the LED lights would be totally adequate for my personal needs.

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RickS
Rod For another look at things, I am frequently clearing snow off my driveway late at night and need good working lights. I am on a private road so other cars are not a concern. Instead I need the lights to light up the driveway. Rick.......

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HubbardRA
Rick, If I had to clear snow from an area late at night, I would set up lights that mounted with either the blade or blower that sat much higher than the ones at grill level. This is what is done on the commercial systems. Most plows or blowers block a significant amount of the light that would shine directly in front of the vehicle. This is why the lights work better when mounted higher and aimed to shine down directly in front of the attachment. This is just my opinion. That is why I said that I looked at things differently. In my opinion there is no single solution for all jobs. Everybody does things differently.

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rfsmith1952
Thanks for your comments. I am right there with all of you. I don't need any more lights either, but somebody else may not have the luxury of waiting till daylight. Lights work both ways. You can see with them, and, sometimes more importantly, other folks can see you. Greg, I don't want to drill any holes either, so the light bar may attach to the rear hitch somehow. The goals are: under $50, lotsa light, very little power, and easy-on, easy off. And the main goal, for me anyway, is have fun! PS @Greg - I did put a blue and white boat seat on the Homey, and that got a good rise out of some of our purist brothers}:)

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rfsmith1952
more pix:










Used 16-18 gauge lamp wire, automotive switch. For power, spliced into the cable running from the solenoid to the ammeter. This line is fused. Ran negative line from engine ground back. Lights are plastic body so you do need a ground wire. Mounted switch, heat shrinked all connections, rubber grommets in the conduit holes. There is one more cross bar right behind the seat that I neglected to get a photo of. Anticipated problems: (1) circuit back wires get loose and caught in one of the many rotating parts under there. (2) you'll need to loosen the seat pan nuts to flip the pan back. So, it provides a decent amount of light, comes off quick, and was under $50. Was fun too!

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rfsmith1952
Thanks, I think a rear light would be great. I tried the lights at night without much ambient light and it really is an interesting effect. Since they are behind you, they appear to be floods rather than spots, so it's like driving in a bubble of light, You can see the tractor switches and controls real well too.

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OldFarmTractor
I just bought three of these from Harbor Freight and they do throw out some decent light. The use 3-1.5V AAA batteries, so I need to figure out a way to make them work on 12V. They are on sale now, so the price on the link is a bit high.
[img]http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/370x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_12896.jpg[/img]
[url]http://www.harborfreight.com/3-3-4-quarter-inch-32-led-flashlight-98504.html[/url]

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