Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
Buickgsman

First attempt at making a hydrolift rod

Recommended Posts

Buickgsman
So I brought my old hydrolift rod down to a local machine shop who often makes rods for cylinders and talked to them about making one of these.. cost would be 70 bucks. Of course I balked at that but partly because I just bought a lathe. The machinist agreed to sell me a piece of .500 stainless and he said if it was him making it he would cut the threads on the lathe. So to make a long story short I got home and cut my metal down and all was going well until it was time to make threads. I used a die to cut them and they came out a tad crooked BUT i know i can do it once I get the threading down on the lathe! Threads are on my list of things to do over the next week. I used emory cloth to get the OD down to .497. It fit in the end cap of the cylinder very nicely. The next one will be useable!




Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GLPointon
I'm enveous...I would love to have a machine lathe. If yours has auto-feed thats the best way to cut threads but more skill than a die. I took two years of Machine Shop classes many yrs ago, and have missed it since...Good Luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steve-wis
Cutting threads with a hand held die is almost impossible to do and get a decent job. Those are mostly good for cleaning up existing threads. Threading on the lathe is not hard to learn. Be sure the tool is ground properly (if using a hand ground high speed steel tool) and be sure also that it is set in the lathe properly. Use a center gage if you have one to set the tool. The compound is set to just a bit shy of 30 degrees. Use the compound to feed in the tool on each pass. Check often for size. You will be happy with the results. Good luck! Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TomMaryland
Die cut threads will never be straight unless your just following chased or turned threads. Did I read that right that you started at .500" and emory clothed to .497"? I would be checking at diameter in several places around and lengthwise, because there is no way that shaft is round anymore. I don;t know if that matters in your application. Good luck with the threads! Set to 29 1/2 deg. ultra sharp carbide or HSS, ground correctly, and only take a few thousands per cut, with some cleamup cuts mixed in. Plenty of cutting oitl mixed in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GregB
You can cut aligned threads with a die in a lathe. Look for a die holder that fits into a chuck in the tailstock.
[img]/club2/attach/GregB/holder copy.jpg[/img]
From McMaster web catalog. Just make sure you have enough depth in the holder to get enough threads. Even if you only get a couple of threads started it may be enough to act as a guide and get the rest straight using a hand die holder with the shaft still in the headstock chuck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Buickgsman
Tom, yeah the diameter of the rod was closer to .499 when I started. I got it to about .4975 all said and done. It went through the rod end of the cylinder no problem so I am assuming its good enough. The o-ring should take up and inconsistincies. Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×