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huffy

Paint question

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huffy
Yesterday morning I painted some parts. A minute ago, I went to spray a coat of clear over one of them. The paint immediately took on a "cracked" appearance. Is this because the underlying paint coat needs to cure longer before the clear is applied, or am I doing something else wrong?

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bud119195
Read the paint can.some paints have to be recoated befor ore after a period of time. What kind of paint and clear are you using?Laquer over enamel does that also

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Talntedmrgreen
I asked my paint manufacturer to recommend a clear, after hearing stories like this. I'm no chemist, so I didn't want to risk the paint job with a clear that was not compatible. What paint did you use again?

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huffy
I was using Rustoleum clear engine enamel over Rustoleum Allis Chalmers Orange. I think that Bud's right and that I didn't wait long enough. I had put some clear over some stuff that I'd painted gray. The can of gray said that it could be top coated after 24 hours, so that's what I did and it worked fine. I didn't bother to read the can of orange, though, and just assumed that it had the same 24 hour wait time as the gray. After reading Bud's reply I double checked, and noticed that the orange stuff says to wait 48 hours instead of 24. So, I guess I'll sand the stuff down again, repaint it orange, and then wait at least 48 hours before I try to top coat it with clear again. Hopefully that'll fix the problem. If not, I guess I'll just forego the clear.

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timflury
Keep us posted on your progress. The more we learn how to do things wrong, the more we can correct in the future. I recently painted four golf cart rims black. I used the same process to paint all four. I wet sanded with 400 and then washed and wiped down the rims with mineral spirits. I use the blue, heavy duty paper towels. Two of the rims went immediate "fish eye" and the paint didn't stick. I ended up taking those two down to bare metal and using a primer on them, where the other two were fine.

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huffy
quote:
Originally posted by timflury
The more we learn how to do things wrong, the more we can correct in the future.
This is why I learn like 10 new things every day. :D

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huffy
It would appear that the problem was in fact that I just needed to let the underlying paint dry longer before I put the clear coat on. I clear coated some other parts last night that had cured longer, and did not get the cracking effect. Unfortunately, though, I did not take into account that the clear coat is much more prone than colored paint to "run" and ended up with a few small spots that I'll have to wet sand and redo. In the end, I figured out that the best way to apply the clear coat is just to quickly put a light "spritz" over the whole thing. If you've ever watched a woman spritz herself with one of those body spray things from those fancy-shmancy boutique stores at the mall, that's roughly the technique. Then I'd wait a while and spritz on another coat. After each "spritzing" it didn't even look like the clear coat did any good, but when I looked at it again this morning after it had dried a while it looked pretty good. Tim: I've had better luck cleaning parts with acetone than mineral spirits. I don't exactly know why, I just seem to have less problems with fish eye, etc, with the acetone.

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GrincheyOne
Chris, Rust-Olium is really good with Engineering Phone, and email support. There are several of their products which require special handling. One of which, at first appearance ("chrome") falls into this category. It will, as the engineer told me, take on a "flaked" or antique) appearance with exposure to strong natural light (sunlight). I am using two of their gloss black products. One is the "engine" paint. This sets well in a couple days, The other is an exterior black, but takes an inordinate amount of time to harden, and I question it's durability over a protracted period of time. OK for patio chairs, but not on my "baby" (2110)! Their engine paints seem to have the best "coating qualities". For the darker finishes the "Rust Reformer" has proven to be the better choices of primer. Currently, during this "monsoon season". I am delaying any painting ! It's what I call "endless wire-wheel days". That B&D brass brush is getting a good workout. My favorite cleaner is "carb and choke cleaner". BTW That spray degreaser from Wal-Mart has changed names. It is now just "Heavy-duty Oven Cleaner". The product has also been moved from the garden center to the grocery departments. Whatever you use it does have the side benefit of keeping the bees and gnats away!:o)

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dentwizz
Rustoleum and other such heavy enamels have a very slow recoat window. The brush type for instance can have a recoat as long as 1-2 weeks! I found that out the hard way:( As far as I know the only paint systems that allow a short recoat window when using clearcoat/sealer is automotive style enamel or laquer. The solvents have to be 100 percent compatible for the coats to cross-link(aka bond) or for the top coat to allow the bottom coat to breathe through it. When it can't breathe, it goes texture or lifts.

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70schopper
Been there done that!!!!! I spoke with alot of paint guys around me and I have come up with a solution. Believe it or not it has definately worked for me. If you shoot your clear while the base coat is still tacky it will not crackle. The results are excellent. I have done it w/ duplicolor clear on allis paint as well as duplicolor paint. Give it a shot it works great for me.

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timflury
quote:
Originally posted by huffy
Tim: I've had better luck cleaning parts with acetone than mineral spirits. I don't exactly know why, I just seem to have less problems with fish eye, etc, with the acetone.
I agree on this 100% Chris. But I'm the guy that doesn't like to wear gloves when working with some chemicals like Acetone. It's nasty stuff, meaning it does an awesome job very quickly. Acetone does have a better degreasing quality than Mineral Spirits. Rust-Oleum recommends reducing their paints with Acetone if you are going to shoot with a spray gun. Trust me, don't use an acrylic measuring cup to measure the acetone. Use glass.:O:O

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GLPointon
Bud was right. It is caused from mixing Laquar and Enamel...FOR SURE!! I went through this same thing years ago on my 7010 resto. I did a part with a differant primer and same paint and it kept wrinkling. I asked a bodyman and he solved it. I used laquar primer and enamel paint on the 2nd part. I sanded off and primed with enamel primer & paint from then on...no trbls sm01

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