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GLPointon

Suitcase weights...added question FLUID IN TIRES??

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GLPointon
Where is the best (cheapest) place to buy suitcase weights? I'm sure they're too heavy to ship so I assume I'll need to goto Big-R, Farm & Fleet, etc?? or a Simp. or Deere dealer? or...? Thanks ? I added questions: Whats the best way to add fluid weight in the tires? The Kwik-Way Loader manual says to add this. 1)Do you treat the rims first so they dont rust? 2)How much gets added...how full? 3)What to use? somebody B4 said Window washer fluid is a cheap way? Sounds bad for the wheels/tires ?(ammonia) thanks for any advice

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HubbardRA
I have 4 suitcase weights that I bought from a Deere dealer. They put out a flyer with a misprint that listed them at about half price. He honored the price for me then threw away all the flyers he still had on hand. He told me I bought them for quite a bit less than they paid for them. They rode home with me, then got repainted.

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RayS
Lowes has them for $49.00 and they are either 43#. That is the cheapest that I have been able to find them. http://www.lowes.com/pd_53243-442-OEM-19A-128_0__?productId=1245647

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timflury
No special treatment is needed if your tires are filled over the height of the inside of the rim, so I'm told. By keeping the rim completely, permanently submerged in liquid, oxygen cannot get to the metal to cause rust. I use -20 windshield washer fluid so it won't freeze in the winter. Around 5.5 gallons in a 23x8.5x12 tire. I think the 10.5" tires take around seven gallons.

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huffy
There's a thread on this in either the common questions or the tech tips section. Should have everything you need to know. I used ww fluid because Menards had it for like $1.19 a gallon on sale. But, for your loader tractor I would think you'd want to consider springing the extra money for Rim Guard, as it's heavier and has other advantages.

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MysTiK
People mostly say windshield washer fluid, and no problems. Load through valve hole. Many strange inventions to accomplish that - it takes some time. As for submerged in liquid - well, it kinda worked for the Titanic since 1912. I knew some hunters who preserved meat by submerge in vegetable oil. Lots of peeps do this. I haven't. But it's a cheap way to grab some weight; and you can still add wweights. Or suitcases. Only drawback is it's kinda like semi-permanent in that you can't just quick change back and forth. Extra set of tires maybe? Other advantage is the liquid just rolls around in the tire; it does not contribute much to rotational momentum re acceleration or braking, so no strain on the drivetrain, etc. Force is mainly straight down to ground; but some inertia of motion. I advertized Kijiji - 'wanted wheel weights' - that worked well. Got a pr of Bolens weights 2x50 lbs @ $65.00. Usually ask is $1 per lb. Mine were delivered cos the guy was working nearby; so he just threw then in his truck. They weigh 52 lbs on the bathroom scale. They take a real effort to move them around. 4i

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GLPointon
The permenent aspect of the fluid weight is ok since this will be a dedicated Loader-Tractor now. but I do need more weights (wheel or suitcase) in addition to the fluid weights.

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Brettw
As an FYI, water / washer fluid is approximately 8#s per gallon. The positive of fluid filled tires vs wheel weights is that the fluid continues to move, rotating as it were, when you stop. This takes some load off of the drivetrain. With wheel weights you are stopping those weight too, and transferring the rotating kinetic energy to the drivetrain.

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MikeES
I can think of only a few things about fluid in the tires. 1.) Corrision if you use calcium chloride - not a problem with windshield washer fluid. 2. Mounting and dismounting the wheels - they are vary heavy! 3. Absorption of horsepower. The fluid sliding around in the wheels creates friction and reduces horsepower to the wheels. That is why you will not see fluid in the tires on pulling tractors.

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huffy
Greg: Here's a link to the Rim Guard stuff I mentioned. I've never tried it myself, but from what I understand it's essentially concentrated beet juice. They say it's much heavier than WW fluid, and guaranteed not to rust the rims. I would think that the added weight would be better for running a loader like you're planning; though I don't know what the cost difference is. http://www.rimguard.biz/FAQs.html.

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Allen Cooper

As an update: Lowes no longer lists any suitcase weights. Home depot lists John Deere Rear Weight @ 42 lbs. ea for $68.60 and MTD suitcase weight @ 42 lbs ea for $61.01

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720nut

MTD weights are plastic suit case weights , believe if I were going this route I'ld use the John Deere suitcase, which are steel. Just my $.02

Anyone know how much fluid it would take for 26x12x12's  ?

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wwbragg

A 26X12X12 wheel is 12" wide and has a diameter of 12".  Imagine a cross section of a tube in that tire.  The tube will over flow slightly beyond the width of the wheel but let's just say the cross section (diameter) of the tube is 12 ".  The area of that cross section will be 3.14*6^2 or 113 sq inches.  Recall that the wheel has a 12" diameter so the tube, if cut and laid out straight, will be 12*3.14 inches long or 37.7 inches.  The volume of the tube would be the product of those two values or 113*37.7 = 4260 cubic inches.  There are 231 cubic inches in a gallon so (based on these broad assumptions) 4260/231 leaves 18 gallons.

I think it safe to use 14 gallons per wheel.  14 gallons of water will add (14*8.3 )  116 lbs to the wheel.

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wwbragg

 

I get 9.25 gals per tire.  I only made one mistake last year (in November) - - - that was one time when I thought I was wrong but really wasn't.    How did you come up with 5?  Maybe my logic is off.

Edited by wwbragg
no change

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720nut

Thanks guys, sure we're not going to be able to fill each tire completely as valve stem will be below leave of fluid and just bubble instead of seating bead ( does that sound right ?)

232 in tires sure would make a big difference on my legacy, but I'm wondering just how much the rears will take ,as I have a full weight box on 3 point now

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