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rich_kildow

Johnny Bucket...other options?

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rich_kildow
I've been thinking about building a loader for my 7116 and came to the realization that all I really need is a Johnny Bucket to eliminate shoveling black dirt, mulch, and crushed granite into a wheelbarrow. I have friends with CUTs with loaders that I can use for the price of fuel. That solves my high lift/high capacity needs like filling my rifle backstop. Are there any other alternatives to the Johnny Bucket? I like the fact that it is lifted by the tractor and has a powered dump ability. I don't like that it attaches just like the plow blade...seems to transfer a lot of force into the axle rather than the frame (I might be wrong there). I saw the bucketeer on here somewhere but that looks like it would be as much work as building a loader. Anything else or any advice on a Johnny Bucket? Anybody in WI/MN/IL want to part with one ;)?

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larry8200
I have used a Scoop-Tote/Sleeve Hitch on my B-210 hydrolift tractor for over a year now and love it. It doesn't stress the front end at all, and actually makes stearing easier. It "scoops" great and lifts about 250 pounds. It has a trip bucket that dumps from the seat. Someday I am going to mount some rear view mirrors... Stiff neck. :) I also have a moldboard and disk harrow for the sleeve hitch and swapping them is as quick and easy as it gets. I paid $70 for mine and it had a sleeve hitch on it. :D Here is the post: http://www.simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=118008&SearchTerms=scoop,tote

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rich_kildow
That would be pretty slick. The big advantage the Johnny Bucket has in my eyes right now is I know where I can get one...albeit for a price. I haven't had a ton of luck finding stuff like that.

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larry8200
quote:
Originally posted by rich_kildow
That would be pretty slick. The big advantage the Johnny Bucket has in my eyes right now is I know where I can get one...albeit for a price. I haven't had a ton of luck finding stuff like that.
The trick is patience, I wasn't looking at all and thet scoop-tote practically dropped intop my lap. I know that isn't likeley to happen again, but I have learned that if I have to have it now, I pay much more than if I look around for a while. And I would pay a fait price if I came across a Johnny Bucket in good shape. Being on the front is harder on the machine but a lot easier to use. I would like the Johnny bucket better if it used thr tractors lift instead of its own electric lift.

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GLPointon
If you have a source for a J-Bucket you should really consider gettin it...the guys on here that have posted pics of one in action really seem like it. A cool attachment and much better than a shovel & much cheaper than a FEL...Good luck sm01 (BTW the weight on the front axle is better than the front frame, it has to transfer back thru the pivot to the axle anyway) The rear mount is heavier duty but harder on the neck :D

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Steve72
Best attachment ever had on my AC...period! And using it like you want--gravel, mulch, dirt etc. But the best is when I have to clean up my burn pile ashes which are always heavy. I used to shovel into a trailer then try to navigate it back into the woods to my "dump" zone. Hated that job--JB makes everything like this fun. I might not be that keen on it if I didn't have a hyro-lift tho. My neighbor has a JB that hitches to the back of his tractor and that "neck thing" Larry spoke of is correct. I like it on the front much better.

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PeppyDan
I made my own version of a J.B. and used it all the time. I sold it once I finished my loader tractor but still sometimes think I should have kept it for job like you mentioned. It seems quicker than the loader on job that don't require much lift height. If you can get one go for it and it will quickly become one of your favorite and most used attachments! Dan

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MysTiK
quote:
Originally posted by GLPointon
If you have a source for a J-Bucket you should really consider gettin it...the guys on here that have posted pics of one in action really seem like it. A cool attachment and much better than a shovel & much cheaper than a FEL...Good luck sm01 (BTW the weight on the front axle is better than the front frame, it has to transfer back thru the pivot to the axle anyway) The rear mount is heavier duty but harder on the neck :D
Greg, can you say this again - or translate it - so I can understand? I get the idea where loading the front frame can stress the bgb. But it seems like the same thing w the axle being connected to front frame. I don't quite get this but I think it's an important point. Maybe I just need to study my tractor's front end more. I get all worried because people say stuff that's not always true, or they just don't know, and someone once said that a simp tractor would not handle an FEL - omg - and I have seen a few. So this is different - but I would like to understand roughly what's in play, if it's possible to explain it easily. I would probably learn more if I disassembled the front end of my tractor to get some first hand experience. But just rephrasing what you already said might be adequate. Or maybe someone else can explain it. ? Also, this front end concern causes me to favour the use of a rear mounted bucket. To avoid neck injuries, people should "keep the chin in and down". (basic yoga trick) and maintain a basic athletic posture - perhaps easier said than done. The neck is vulnerable when extended - "don't stick your neck out" - ancient wisdom, lost in the translation.

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gwiseman
I have a Swisher bucket retrofitted by SmilinSam for rbt & fdt. It's great to move topsoil, mulch, & rock from driveway to yard. No evidence of frame or structural stress.

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RickS
I have one of the early Johnny Buckets and it is really handy. I have used it to move dirt, gravel, stone dust, crusher run, loam, rocks, and manure. While I don't use it all the time it is one of the most useful attachments I have. While the bucket is limited in its digger capacity, if you are patient and work at it, you can dig with it. I will say I will never part with it. Unless a Legacy tractor with a front end loader appears in the driveway. Rick.........

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Talntedmrgreen
I would think the ease of use for a front mount system far outweights any concerns for stress on the front axle. These front ends are so very easy to maintain, and even rebuild if desired. They are stout and handle decades of dozing, lugging around blowers packed with snow, etc. Permanent damage can be avoided if an operator watches for the axle bolt to loosen, keeps an eye on the spindle bushings for slop/play, and then operates the bucket normally. You should never have an issue. To go a step further, add the spindle thrust bearings, bush the axle and mounts, and you will increase function while making the front end infintely rebuildable. The only real downfall to the front mount would be harder steering, and there are remedies for that. All worth it, if you foresee the need for a bucket. Besides, you'll be having too much fun to be concerned about that ;)

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MysTiK
quote:
Originally posted by Talntedmrgreen
I would think the ease of use for a front mount system far outweights any concerns for stress on the front axle. These front ends are so very easy to maintain, and even rebuild if desired. They are stout and handle decades of dozing, lugging around blowers packed with snow, etc. Permanent damage can be avoided if an operator watches for the axle bolt to loosen, keeps an eye on the spindle bushings for slop/play, and then operates the bucket normally. You should never have an issue. To go a step further, add the spindle thrust bearings, bush the axle and mounts, and you will increase function while making the front end infintely rebuildable. The only real downfall to the front mount would be harder steering, and there are remedies for that. All worth it, if you foresee the need for a bucket. Besides, you'll be having too much fun to be concerned about that ;)
Thank you, josh. sm03

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rich_kildow
If I wasn't sold before, I am now. Are there any walkthrough's from homemade Johnny Bucket's? I'm contemplating buying one at full price but I have all the tools to build one (welder, plasma cutter, etc).

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GLPointon
Graham, My point was that its better to have a JB mounted on the front axle(where a snow plow/deck mounts) vs. mounting the same weight to the front tractor frame. Because any weight on the frame is transfered back thru the axle to the ground anyway. So the better choice is to carry the weight on the axle vs the frame (which stresses more parts in the pivot) The JB's only mount to the frnt axle anyway. Now the FEL issue: a tractors weak point is the BGB. The front half of tractor bolts on the front of the BGB and the rear end bolts to the back of the BGB. The AC 300 & 400 series have frames that overlap at the BGB making them good canidates for FEL's. The reason you have seen many FDT & RBT's with FEL is because they have "sub frames" that bridge the BGB "weak point" On my AC/Loader I chose to use a AC400 series AND built a sub frame so I could load the crap out of it...:D

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HerbP
I actually just built one as well and so far I love it. I'm not finished by any means and I was fortunate to have a friend with a sheet metal shop who was able to take a sheet of 3/16" steel and cut it up on his shears in 15 minutes... That made the bucket. Then I just built a frame, used some flange bearings for the pivot mechanism, an electric actuator for the tilt, and the front hydro for the lift. I won't do any digging with it because the actuator isn't really strong enough to withstand the forces involved, but for moving piles of dirt/gravel and firewood around, it beats the mighty shovel all to heck. I uploaded a video to youtube. Sorry for the sore neck: http://youtu.be/xNdgjxLxjYo

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rokon2813
Rich, for "quick and dirty" to try before you buy, since you have the tools, use your snow plow blade. Build the sides and bottom of a bucket, attach to plow with pipe and pin type hinges at the top, one longer piece of angle iron up one side and a pull rope at the top to "dump". "clamp" style bucket fast and easy to build. :D;)

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MysTiK
quote:
Originally posted by GLPointon
Graham, My point was that its better to have a JB mounted on the front axle(where a snow plow/deck mounts) vs. mounting the same weight to the front tractor frame. Because any weight on the frame is transfered back thru the axle to the ground anyway. So the better choice is to carry the weight on the axle vs the frame (which stresses more parts in the pivot) The JB's only mount to the frnt axle anyway. Now the FEL issue: a tractors weak point is the BGB. The front half of tractor bolts on the front of the BGB and the rear end bolts to the back of the BGB. The AC 300 & 400 series have frames that overlap at the BGB making them good canidates for FEL's. The reason you have seen many FDT & RBT's with FEL is because they have "sub frames" that bridge the BGB "weak point" On my AC/Loader I chose to use a AC400 series AND built a sub frame so I could load the crap out of it...:D
and thank you, greg - I think I'm beginning to understand. esp. the load the crap out of it part. 8) :D

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acfarmer
I'd wholeheartedly disagree thats its better to have the weight on the front axle.Its much better to have as much weight as possible on the rear of the tractor for several reasons 1)rear is much stronger than the front and the front spindles are the weak point.2)The more weight that transfers to the rear the better the traction all the weight on the front axle is a nightmare for getting traction plus you're more likely to bust up something when you hit a hole.3)Stability; rear weight makes for more stability especially the higher the weight goes.4) Steering;the more weight on the front the harder it steers plus more wear and tear on the steering.

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MysTiK
thanks, gary I like the 'scoop tote' and others for those reasons. Also my property can be hilly in spots, and a heavy front end going downhill, means an even heavier front end and lighter rear end due to relocated center of gravity - and no safe way to brake or reduce speed, unless you like doing "endos". Seems nicer to have the entire tractor under control for the ride. Same reason a Sunrunner or a Frontcut is not good on downhills. Not to mention traversing hills, on simple uneven ground, rough and slightly sloped with reduced steering. I suppose I would use whatever I had - but it's good to know what's in play for basic safety and longevity of both machine and operator. I'd find out soon enough hopefully.

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gjh
Rokon: I thought about the same thing with my plow. Any pics of your set up? I am hoping I can remove the sides and bottom as I sold my old plow so only have the one for snow and grading my driveway. My use would be to transfer/move mulch, dirt and other 100-200lb loads from one side of my property to the other. Only need to lift it high enough to clear the ground when I move.

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rokon2813
I have to confess, I have never built one :D:D I have seen a few on the net though. Here is one someone built on a Sunstar http://www.mytractorforum.com/showthread.php?t=140449 My brother has one I think on his CC but I never looked that close at it. My home built "johnny bucket" is built out of a nobody shoot me here an original bucket from the early loaders for the B1

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