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mowerman1193

How much fluid in tires??

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mowerman1193

I will be painting my wheels for my little Broadmoor 717 this week and soon will be mounting tires on them..hoping to get a set of 18x9.50x8 bar lugs with tubs so I can put washer fluid in them..

I have never expermented with the filled tires and was wondering how to figure how much fluid will I be able to get in them and how much weight will it give me??

Thanks,

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DaleC

Washer fluid seems to be the fluid of choice because, even though it does not have the weight of calcium cloride, it is not corrosive and still gives us 8 lbs. per gallon. A dealer told me that 10.5/23/12 holds 6 gallon. I would think yours would do about 4. Thats 32 lbs. I ask about using tubes and the dealer said no. Just break down one side and pour in the windsheild washer fluid.

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fuzy

Like dalec said just break the bead on one side and with the tire flat fill it to within an inch or so of the bead area on the rim. And yes we only use windshield washer fluid. Very cheap, won't freeze, won't rot the tire, and if a leak develops it is basically harmless.

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Kent

Just make sure you get the Winter mix of windshield washer fluid... it has antifreeze in it good to about 20 below.

Lay the wheel down, with the valve stem up. Carefully break the bead seal on the top, across the wheel opposite the valve stem. Pour in as much as you can get in there (the tire "balloons out" so you can't completely fill it... Then, reinflate the tire to reseat the bead. Finally, stand the tire up with the valve stem in the 12 o'clock position. Let out any excess fluid that you might have, down to the level of the valve stem. Then check your tire pressure and inflate it to the normal setting.

This insures that the liquid is always covering almost the entire wheel, so it can't possibly rust. It must be exposed to air to rust. Even though the WW washer has antifreeze in it, it can attract moisture and condensation from the air...

I've been putting almost 6 gallons in a 23 X 8.50 X 12 tire... If I were you, I'd buy 10 gallons for a pair of the wide Broadmoor tires. If you have any left over, just use it your car's windshield washer...

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mowerman1193

Thanks for the info...looks like I will do this when I get this ready to mount the tires...alot cheaper than the wheel weights I bought for it a year ago and then never installed them, LOL

I will probably use tubes seens I will have it apart anyway..Plus I think it would be alot less messy if I need to break the tires down again...

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mowerman1193

Well I got to thinking if I use tubes I wont be able to just pour it in.I thought I read once that Napa has some kind of adapter for the valve stem...Anyone have any experiance with this...Maybe I wont be able to use tubes...

Thanks

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roma3112

MOWERMAN

Napa does indeed have such an adaptor, when I got my new sovereign last winter i filled the tires with ww fluid (got it at my local whosale club)this adaptor helped out quite a bit. I dont have a part# it was hanging on one of those display racks with the tire repair stuff and some other stuff. I did a post about fluid in tires a while (year or more) ago which had part#'s and a pic of the device, i could not seem to find it in the archives. If you have no luck at NAPA mabee kent can help you find that old post.

good luck

john

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Bunky

I would also use tubes.. Over the years of seeing all the farm tractors that have leaked, even though WW fluid is non corrosive I think it would still make a mess and too me taking apart a tire with fluid would be like taking apart a tire some one used fix a flat in ... just alittle less messy....

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MadMike

Based on the thread previously posted, I stopped by my local NAPA dealer and picked up one of the adaptors about 3 months ago. Of course I haven't had the time to strip down and paint my extra rims that I will be putting Bar Treads on. Come to think of it, it's almost November and here in Michigan that can mean snow any day. If only this full time job didn't get in the way so much....

(When I do get the job done I will post my review of the fluid adaptor)

Mike

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DaleC

The only problem with using tubes is you have to inflate them with fluid. That takes a pump. Without tubes you pour the fluid in and pump it up. I have no idea how hard it is to seat the bead and inflate the tire. You can not compare the corrosive nature of the calcium and the washer fluid. The calcium will eat up the rim and washer fluid will get it wet. I do not see anyway that you can use a tube without a pump. If you can, please let us know. It would be real handy to be able to use it that way.

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UCD

I have a set of Ag tires that were loaded 30 years ago with Calcium Cloride and no tubes. If the tires are filled to cover the wheel they will not rust as it takes oxygen to creat the rust. I had one with a pin hole in it a year ago but it was not rusted from the inside out. It rusted from the outside in. The inside of the wheel was just like the day it was loaded nice white paint. I did install tubes when I had the tires reloaded. With the tool from napa to fill the tires as you pour the fluid in the air is let out. When the tire is full you can add air to the pressure you desire. I do not have any air pressuse in mine at all and they are plenty hard enough.

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mowerman1193

Thanks for all the help folks,I printed that part number so I wont loose it...now I will probably loose the paper, LOL

I can't wait to try this out...but I need to shop around for my tires now..

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rokon2813

If your real ambitious you can load tubes with a portable air tank. First drain the tank, than remove the largest fitting (usually the guage). With a very small funnel, this is the ambitious part, the hole is still small and its time consuming. Fill the tank with your washer fluid. Reinstall whatever fitting you removed, put a little pressure in the tank, only 5 to 10 pounds is needed. Then TURN THE TANK OVER so the outlet is at the very bottom and fill your tires. The air will rise above the fluid and as long as the outlet remains covered by liquid only liquid will enter the tube. When your done completely empty the tank of liquid.

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