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Bevel Gear- is it worn out???


LesH

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I have a question about the bevel gears in the B series- besides looking at the shaft for looseness and checking for oil in the bevel gearbox, how can you tell if one of these has troubles??
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Short of disassembling and checking each component, I would: 1) LISTEN to and FEEL the BGB with the engine running and all belts removed. The BGB should operate quietly and vibration free. 2) Reinstall a belt and place a load on the BGB. It should still be quiet and vibration free. 3) Remove the cover, drain the oil, and inspect for metal particles. 4) With the cover removed, disconnect the driveshaft, remove the belts and check for any excessive lateral or radial movement, and excessive backlash between the gear teeth, or looseness between the gears and shaft. 5) Pay particular attention to bearing looseness, “grabbing”, or “gritting”. Since many BGB problems start with bearing failure, the bearings must operate very smoothly. Study your parts book as you perform the inspection. You will see where retaining rings hold the gears and pulleys, where shaft keys hold the gears, and where conical washers hold the input gear.
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If the tractor is shaking, the engine roaring, and you aren't moving, chances are it's shot....sorry, I'm venting. (see subsequent posting) Galen
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...on a more serious note, and in hindsight... Everything Dutch has mentioned is great for diagnosing the bevel gearbox. However, two quick tests (that I failed to do) will tell you whether to proceed with further examination. 1) with the tractor off and out of gear, grab the PTO or drive pulley and turn the drive shaft. If there is noticable "play" in the movement such that one can rotate at all without affecting the other, you need do further examination. 2) with the engine off, somehow, either by raising the console or by going in behind the engine, try to determine if there is _any_ lateral/vertical movement in the shaft at the gearbox end beyond casual flexing of the coupling joints. If so, get everyone out of the pool immediately!! You've got problems. The input bearing set is most likely gone and it is just a matter of (no)time before your gearbox begins melting into a heap of noisy metal. Good luck! Galen
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