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Need source for Calcium Chloride solution (Heavy T


arnoldir

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Calcium cloride(CaCl) is a powder. You dissolve 2 lbs. per gallon. This protects from freezine and makes it heavier. Jordan
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This is a good question, one that I need help on as well. Can the average joe put fluid in these tires? I have a 5 hp air compressor. How is the fluid injected in the tires?
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Search back to message 1284 for the pros and cons on fluid type and fluid vs weights. Message 4630 has P/N for a tool that is supposed to make it easy. I'm leaning towards the chloride, as the tires are only little 5"x 8" Ag fronts, and this Gravely has the engine in the rear. If I'm going to have to mix my own, has anyone mixed more than 2# per gallon as suggested above. I'm thinking I should try and get it as thick as possible, but so it will still flow into the tube.
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On tires that small I would use washer fluid, but if you really need Calcium have someone with the right equipment do the job. It takes a special valve stem that would need to be vulcanized onto your tube.
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2# per gallon is a saturated solution. More than that won't go into solution but remain a solid on the bottom of the container.
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Hi all, I don't have an answer other then on a bag of calium deicer that I had bought it had the directions on how to make it into a liquid form. Personally I would use RV antifreeze but to each there own. Now to install it in the tire "without tubes" Napa Auto parts store sells a special valve kit for about $8.00 "can't remember for sure, to which I have one and it works very well. It has all the adaptors and is made to last a long time being chrome plated. It just screws onto the valve stem and has a bleeder valve built into it so that you can let air out as the fuild goes into the tire. I hope this helps and best to all, >>->happyjack<-<< P.S. I am not sure about using fuild in tubes if I recall there is a reason not to do so but I could be mistaken.
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If you like your tractor or plan to keep it or even if you don't like it, Do Not Put Chloride in the tires. Over time even with tubes, it will badly rust the rims and may destroy them. Find some other way to add the weight. The local scrap yard has 1 inch plate and they will probably cut you a piece or something but in my opinion don't put chloride in any tire.
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I'll have to agree with Del. Chloride is bad news. Think about the mess if you ever get a puncture. Besides, front tires won't hold enough fluid to add that much weight. You're better off with external weight that you can add or take away as needed.
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Calcium chloride USED to be good, I wouldn't reccomend it to anyone, on my case tractor (DC-4) the person who owned it before left the calcium chloride in there and the rims are flaking on the inside and OUTSIDE, the calcium chloride was in the tubes, but destroyed the tubes and leaked out in the rims, washer fluid and wheel weights are the only good option unless you have a set of junk rims for something like this, but I strongly go against the use of the stuff.-BradW
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Hey guys, I know most of you favor using washer fluid to add weight to your tires. The gravely I just picked up will need as much weight up front as I can give it. I have a Walker that I was told had Calcium Chloride liquid in the tires, and they are VERY heavy. Does anyone have an idea how this is done? do I buy it as a liquid, or buy powder (Ice Melt?) and dissolve it in water. I will be using tubes, no rust worries. As always, thanks in advance
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Try getting the solution from an Agricultural tractor dealer. I'm ordering an L3710 and the dealer asked me if I wanted the rears filled with the solution.
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There is an alteritive to fluid it is foam I recently stopped at a tire place to find out about adding fluid to my tires he suggested foam they spray it in your tires as a fluid and in 24 hr its a solid foam really heavy and you will never get a flat tire again the down fall is its pricy 13x8 tires were about $100.00 a piece
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