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huffy

Block heater

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huffy

Sometimes my LL is hard to start when temps stay below freezing for a while. Does anyone make a block heater for the older style Briggs? Mine is a 300421. The only heater I saw on Briggs' website looks to be made to slide down inside the dip stick tube that runs alongside the newer engines. It doesn't look like it would work with my engine.

I've been putting a light on top of the motor sometimes, but don't really like doing that.

Also, I read on here that full synthetic oil is better for cold starting. The manual for my motor says to use 30w oil. I haven't seen 30w full synthetic at any of the places by me. I'm sure somewhere has it, but I haven't seen it. What would be a comparable weight that I could use in synthetic?

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RayS

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Chris, This white Briggs and decal is from 1978. They were already starting to recommend multi-viscosity oils then.

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Another from the 80`s recommending you could use it in the summer.

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16hp Briggs from 1987.

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Synthetic mentioned.

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Your manual is 45 years old. As oil evolved so did Briggs oil recommendations. This one suggest that the use of 30w below 40 degrees could result in cylinder bore damage.I have used synthetic oil off and on for past 10 years or so without any issues and 10w30 dino just as long. They do start or spin easier with a multi viscosity engine oil in winter temperatures.

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BLT

There isn't enough smooth surface for a magnetic block heater to clamp down on that I can remember. An without that you can burn out the heater elements in a short time. A dipstick is also ineffective method as it only heats the oil around the stick. And if it gets too hot the oil will coke up and stick removal is a bummer. Oil is a very poor conductor of heat and does not radiate out unless it is pumped around.

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RickS

Chris,

Maynard (UCD) had a 7790 and he would put a heat lamp on it for twenty minutes before he started it. He never had any trouble. I use the same trick as well.

I have even used this trick for my car at very cold temperatures. I would continue to do what you are doing and not worry about it.

Rick..........

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toomanytractors

Amsoil markets a 30/10w30 small engine formula for air cooled applications. It replaces a 30wt and 10w30 because it is formulated to meet and/or exceed the specifications of both. In other words it will flow like a 10wt when cold yet protect like a 30wt when it's hot. I've used this product for several years year 'round and have no issues with cold weather starting. And, my tractors do sit outside most of the time.

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rich_kildow

http://www.farmandfleet.com/products/683406-duraflame-utility-portable-electric-heater.html#.UQqmzL88CSo

I have something like this that I slide under it about 20 minutes before I start it up. These are small enough that there is enough gap that I can't possibly see it causing any damage...and I'm a bit gun shy when it comes to combustibles and heat.

Like others have said, a lighter oil in the winter will go a long ways as well.

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huffy
quote:Originally posted by RickS

Maynard (UCD) had a 7790 and he would put a heat lamp on it for twenty minutes before he started it. He never had any trouble. I use the same trick as well.I have even used this trick for my car at very cold temperatures. I would continue to do what you are doing and not worry about it.


id="quote">
id="quote">This is the lamp I've been using, just because it's what I had laying around: http://www.tractorsupply.com/jobsmart-reg-500-watt-halogen-worklight-3206029I go out in the morning about an hour before I intend to plow, take the hood off the tractor and set this on top of the motor with the light pointed down at the head. Then I drink some coffee and read the paper or watch the morning news. So far it hasn't hurt anything, but I'm always afraid that I'm going to be taking a bite of my nutty dunker and hear a boom, or go out to plow and see that my garage has burst into flames.

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Kenh

I bought a pad heater for the Onan in my skid steer. The Onan is an aluminum block so my choices were limited. MAN, does that pad heater work. I have the 150 watt which is about the right size for my 3.5 quart oil pan. It is self adhesive and will only come off by great force which ruins the heater.

In about 3 hours the whole engine is nice and toasty warm. The oil pressure light goes off with just cranking and the starting is about four turns of the crankshaft with minimal choke.

I highly recommend these heaters. The only problem is finding a place to put them. If push comes to shove I suppose you could put it on the plate under the motor and enough heat will transfer into the engine to at least ward the oil enough to make the engine crank a bit easier.

Ken

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Brettw

It also helps to depress the clutch pedal and take the transmission, hydro, gear, shuttle, etc., out of the chain of parts that the starter has to turn. The one thing to watch is, if you have a hydro and are not used to using the clutch at all, the idler pulley and return spring can be rusty and will not move freely. Therefore, you depress the "clutch" pedal and it does not return or only returns partially, and you do not move or move slowly without real power. Need to make sure those parts move freely after using the pedal, if you are not usually inclined to do so.

It does however, make a big difference in not having to turn over the trans too when trying to start the tractor.

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BLT
quote:Originally posted by rich_kildow

Does pressing the pedal on my 7116 do the same? I never use it and never really was sure if it is a clutch or just a bake.


id="quote">
id="quote">Yes it does. Lift your seat pan and you can see it function.

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dirtmister16

ive been using synthetic 5w30 this year. havn't had any issue at all starting. i left the B10 outide since one oclock and started it at 6:30. it turned over just a bit slow and fired, but didn't run. turned it over once more and it fired and was running on the choke.

id say it was 14 maybe today but lots of wind, so the wind was blowing by the tractor as well. not sure what it got down to tonight.

so if you ask me snythetic works well in the winter.

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MikeES

I run 5w-40 full synthetic in the engines year around and synthetic gear lube in the BGB. The engine rolls over like summer, not so before. The other thing that I have found on the Briggs engines is to hold the throttle against the idle stop, they start at -10 on the 1st or 2nd rotation every time.

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MysTiK

I tend to think that a 25w light bulb in a trouble light would safely hang beneath an engine. I know it's not possible to light a cigarette from any household light bulb. There is no requirement to mimic a hot day in Jamaica, mahn. After all these years, heat still rises. For advanced heating, a guy could drape a small tarp over the hood area, like a tent, or, like a warm blanky on a bed. This assumes a garage. The heat transfer is mainly a function of simple convection, with an option to entrap. The main problem is that sae30 is thick, and designed for hot running conditions where viscosity breakdown can occur with lighter oils. But for starting, mimicking early Fall conditions will suffice - and that's still cool - but it's not a freeze - and that should suffice.

Never use the brake on a running hydro - unless you think popping the clutch at full throttle will help your hyd trans. But it's great for starting, and while idling, release the clutch - you can hear the trans start to spin. Allow a brief warmup period before using. Idle speed matters; esp. on a hydro, to maintain fluid flow/pressure/etc.

Another thing about fumes in garage - unless there's an open source, they take time to build up, if present at all. Open the garage door and vent the place first - then apply your preferred heating device.

Battery maintenance is important.

Everything is connected. but that comment is likely not appreciated by some. Human experiential awareness is irrelevant, not understood, or not allowed, it seems - it's certainly discouraged, censored?. I have a self-aware tractor. You don't believe that; but I can visualize it right now, in my reality. And my tractor starts well. No problem, with any of it. I swapped out 15w-40 diesel oil (it was only slightly more drag) for 10w30. Noticeably improved rate of rotation. Clutch in. Dino oil. cheap - it was doing "nothing better" in the garage. Anything to preserve my Starter (also works well). I will return to 15w40 soon, as we will have an early spring. Comments relate to my personal experience with my own personal 716H, and other things, some of which is of an unlimited nature. Your reality may differ. Of course. Enjoy it.

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Talntedmrgreen

I'm sure it's a bit colder elsewhere, but I never have starting issues, on any machines. I use dino 10w-30 in everything. The B-110 and HB-112 start fine, every time. Couple cranks and they are runnin. Coldest start this year was somewhere south of zero...maybe 4 below? Even the model 19 started last week, with some choke-coaxing, and that hadn't been fired up in a month or more. It was 15 degrees or so out.

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huffy
quote:Originally posted by Talntedmrgreen

I never have starting issues, on any machines.


id="quote">
id="quote">Thanks. Your bragging about that makes me feel so much better about having to go out at 4 am this morning to put my heat lamp on. :)I put fresh Briggs 5w30 full synthetic in this morning (after fixing my diff issue).I think a small part of it may be that I rebuilt the engine this summer, and didn't run it very much at all thereafter. Perhaps the rings haven't fully worn in yet. Or, it could be that the tractor just does this to annoy me.

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huffy
quote:Originally posted by MysTiK

I tend to think that a 25w light bulb in a trouble light would safely hang beneath an engine. I know it's not possible to light a cigarette from any household light bulb.


id="quote">
id="quote">Never tried to light a cigarette off a light bulb. But, I'd be leery about hanging a burning light bulb underneath a gas leaking Briggs.

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MysTiK
Originally posted by huffy
quote:
id="quote">Yeh, that gas stuff. It's actually kinda remarkably safe also. I used to know a guy who worked gas station, and used to fill cars with a smoke in his mouth. But the trapped fumes from it might be a lil different. If you're running a 500w halogen, well.... BOOOOMMM. :D (oops) I mean that puppy must be HOT. Is that the grow light? or another type. I have a heat lamp. I should use that in my garage for keep warmeez.But the point is you don't need much heat, or for long. I remember my dad using a light bulb outside, no garage, a long time ago. It worked outside too.I just know you'll work it out, huff. sm01 Aren't tractors just so much fun? 8) B) :osm03

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Brettw
quote:Does pressing the pedal on my 7116 do the same? I never use it and never really was sure if it is a clutch or just a bake.id="quote">
id="quote">

Actually, in essence, it is both. As it is depressed, it takes tension off of the belt and disengages the trans from the bevel gear box. Basically a "clutch". Depressed all of the way and with pressure, it tightens the brake band and acts as a brake. So it preforms both functions.

Hydro guys rarely use it, hence it gets sticky, rusty, etc. If you get in the habit of using it to start the tractor, it does not get sticky (generally) and it extends the life of the starter, makes the tractor start better/quicker, and in my opinion is good practice.

As always however, it might be best to crack a beer or two, and ponder the entire theory thoroughly to be certain it is a viable option. ;)

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