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SimplicitySwede

WD-45

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SimplicitySwede

So I have kinda started my own business I think. I been working on a Farmall H that I have been restoring for a guy. Well my dad works with a guy who wanted his WD-45 painted. He told me its been sitting in a shed for bout 8 years. I told him I could do it. Which included I had to get it running. Well he winched it on a trailer and dropped it off at my house. Well My buddy and I were looking at it. Im a Farmall guy and know nothing about AC. I asked him if he wanted to try and get it running? hes like sure. I said 1st things 1st. Grabbed the hand crank and went to turn it over. Wouldnt budge. Great. Pulled the plugs corrosion on number 2. Shined a light in the plug hole and saw rust. Yup shes stuck solid. I called the guy and he said he wanted to overhaul it. So thats what ill be doin. I may have a few ?s for you guys here. 1st off whats the best way to pull an engine outta a 45? Heres some pics

http://s1172.photobucket.com/user/SimplicitySwede/library/Toys/Allis%20Chalmers%20WD45%202nd%20Customer%20Dan%20Carson?sort=3&page=1

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Ronald Hribar

Think i would pull head off first

and soak each piston

until you can get motor to budge

Blocks of wood on top of piston

and pound on them until you get some movement

If i remember correctly WD-45 has a frame motor sits in

remove radiator , hood , driveshaft

and pull it out

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JimDk

You may have a problem trying to turn the engine with the head off. I repaired a stuck Allis "C" with no. 1 & 4 stuck. If your crank is on the up-stroke, your no. 2 & 3 sleeves will try to push out of the block. Mine did. I had to pull sleeves, pistons & rods as a unit and tear them apart on the bench ( after much soaking and gentle beating ).

If you decide to rebuild it, you may want to get a repair manual for that engine. I hear that the rods in the WD & WD-45 are critical as to re-installation exactly as they came out. I never worked on a WD-45, but spent many happy hours on the seat of one in my younger days.

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Brettw

Jared:

Looks like quite an undertaking. If you are starting a business like you said, more power to you! You said "1st things 1st", and I would agree. If you haven't, I would recommend putting what you are going to do in writing. You are going to overhaul an engine, clean and paint a tractor, and possibly everything in between. That is taking on a lot. And with that goes a ton of expenses, a lot of hours, and a great deal of responsibility. What are the owners expectations? For cost? For finished product? For warranty?

I am simply suggesting that you make sure that you and the owner are on the same page. How are the costs and expenses to be paid for? Does he simply want a running tractor with a coat of paint on it, or does he expect a showroom / parade restoration? After he spends the money and you are done, what does he expect you to do if there is a bad cylinder down the road, or other issues?

These are the parts of business that are not much fun, but are more important, in reality, than anything you may do to the tractor itself. Be careful, be diligent, and have fun! And, good luck on your endeavor, it's a great opportunity!

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steve-wis

I overhauled my dad's wd when I was 15, a long time ago. It is a fairly straightforward job. I bought the rebuild kit with new sleeves, pistons and rings. Suprisingly the crank and cam were still in spec. I removed the sleeves with a maple block and a sledge hammer. dish soap for lube on the new o rings and sleeves. Take care when you mount the rods, the caps will probably need to be shimmed or else they will be too tight. I ended up with mine just a bit tight, had to pull it down a blacktop road to get it to turn over but when it started, i ran it for about two hours at various speeds but never too fast. It heated a bit at first, then temp dropped into normal and it was fine. It ran for thirty years that I know of after that, and was running fine last I saw it.

Good luck, should be a nice project for you. By the way, this would be the time for a new clutch also. Pulling the engine was easy too, pull the radiator, loosen the bolts for the front end so the frame rails can be widened a bit, and it came out easy, I might have taken off one side rail, not sure on that.

Steve

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PhanDad

OK, time for a dumb question.

How does water get into a single cylinder?

Down the exhaust stack and into the cylinder with the open exhaust valve? I see a can on the stack, so that should prevent that.

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SimplicitySwede
quote:Originally posted by PhanDad

OK, time for a dumb question.How does water get into a single cylinder? Down the exhaust stack and into the cylinder with the open exhaust valve? I see a can on the stack, so that should prevent that.


id="quote">
id="quote">It sat uncovered in a shed. I assume the shed leaked.

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toomanytractors

Jared: I looked at the pic of that block and it may not be as bad as you think. Clean up the cylinder walls as well as you can and blow out the debris with compressed air. Then pour a little gasoline down each hole and let it soak overnight follow that up with some diesel fuel for a couple of days. If you use a block of wood and a hammer to try breaking things loose have someone on the crank at the same time. Another trick after soaking would be to bolt the head back on and try rocking the tractor with the transmission in low gear. Maybe even try pulling it a short distance while in gear. If you use the hammer and block method try to stay away from the outside of the piston.. I did that once on an old Briggs and ended up smashing the top ring land. Something else you might try after soaking is to bolt the head back on with the old gasket and remove the top radiator hose and fill the block with good hot water. This may expand the sleeves enough to let it turn. Good luck and let us know.

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Ronald Hribar

you want the head on so the sleeves do not come out of block

in case you are wondering why put the head on. And put the tractor in a high gear.

And do you know if the clutch is stuck or not ?

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JimDk

Do not pull it to try to break the engine loose. You will bend, or break, some expensive parts. Rocking in high gear is good. If you have a hand crank, hang a weight on the handle and let it set for several days. Keep putting the "rust buster" to it.

A good "rust buster" is 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone. I use it all the time. Not good for plastic parts, though.

A good source of info is the farm equipment forum at allischalmers.com

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Homesteader

I use a three part mix of diesel fuel, ATF, and brake fluid. All equal parts. dump it in each cylinder and let er sit for a few days. And it has worked every time.

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SimplicitySwede

Pulled 3 of the pistons out today. The rings on number 3 were compressed when they came out. Still are compressed. Stuck solid to the piston. Pistons look clean thought like it was a fresh over haul. Crank looks good. If I can get number 2 out ill do an inframe. But I gotta get the piston out the top. Ya pulling in gear only burns the clutch up. You can stick a pry bar on the fly wheel on some engines and break em loose. This needs overhauled. Just the top end is in to bad of shape. Definetly gonna need the head redone.

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JimDk

My pistons/rings from the Allis "C" were in the same condition. I soaked the pistons in my parts washer over night and the rings did come free. My engine had been overhauled and never started, had some new valves installed which were rusty and had to be dressed. The sleeves had some minor pitting, but I used them anyways. The engine smoked for a short time but cleaned up nicely and had good power.

You may be able to salvage some parts.

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