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sispro

Wheel weights vs loaded tires

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RickS

Daniel,

This can be a tricky question. Some members prefer loaded tires, others prefer wheel weights, and others prefer weights you can add or remove easily.

On one of my tractors I run AG's, wheel weights, and chains. On the other tractor I run turf tires, dual wheel weights, and chains.

Maybe it would help if you could tell us what you are trying to do.

Rick.......

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sispro

On my tractor I have AG now on my last tractor I ran AG with loaded tires and chains had no problems. I have just got theses 50 lbs. Weights each weight that I don't want to over do it and I don't want to whist a axle cause I have done that before on my last one just trying to see what most uses cause I may just put the weights up for sale

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RickS

You should be able to run 50 pound wheel weights without any trouble. In general it is how you use the tractor that will cause problems, not the weight you add to it (with in reason).

If you are having traction issues, or move a lot of snow, I would go ahead and add the wheel weights without a thought.

Rick........

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RayS

I use turf tires and chains. I have all kinds of weights and need none of them. I have a set of turf tires that I leave the chains on year round. When winter gets here. I swap tires. Your lucky if you get enough snow in Michigan to justify putting the blower on the tractor.

I wouldn`t put any liquid in a tire. Calcium chloride, wind shield washer fluid or otherwise. All it does is eat the rim.

Last year I put the blower on, on my birthday and took it off three weeks later.

I got my suit case weights cheap and if I need any weight I will use them from now on. I never needed weights in the past.

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huffy
quote:Your lucky if you get enough snow in Michigan to justify putting the blower on the tractor.id="quote">
id="quote">

LOL . . . maybe you downstater's don't, but we sure get plenty of it up here.

Like the other guys have stated, all three ways to add weight will work; and all three have their benefits and drawbacks. Filling tires with WW fluid is cheap; you can fill both back tires for less than $20 if you catch the fluid on sale. But, then it's a PITA if you want to change a tire. Wheel weights are expensive, but you can take them off when you don't want weight on the back or want to change the tire. Suitcase weights are also good, because you can take the weight off when you don't want it on or move it to the front. But, weights and racks are usually even more expensive than wheel weights.

I use turfs and chains. I find they work better than AG's on the hard packed snow and ice that inevitably develops. I leave them on all year round, even when I mow. So long as you don't spin the tires, it doesn't hurt the grass a bit.

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Talntedmrgreen

I also am a weight fan. It makes sense to me, that some argue that weight added above the axle can also expedite wear on your bushings and bearings, thus wheel weights or fluid keep weight off the axle, and over the rubber, BUT, I still like suitcase weights for their convenience. Some also may argue that weight on the wheel can cause premature key failure. Also makes sense, so I go easy on my direction changes.

Like Ray, I st don't care to add fluid. Stuff that doesn't rot your rim is expensive, and you're stuck with it there. In a pinch, I can sell my wheel weights and suitcase weights, but selling fluid is a bit more tricky, and a heck of a lot more difficult to ship once it's in a rim. ;)

I prefer turfs and chains. As long as it's cold here, it snows. We get in those dog days of winter, and it snows 6+ inches a day, every day, for days or even weeks on end. Difference between my place and Chris's, is that we get the thaws, which cuts down on overall snowcover. He doesn't...the crap gets eyeball deep and stays that way for months. sm00

I don't mind AG's in snow, but they aren't worth a hoot on packed snow or ice. I used to leave chains on even for mowing, but now have sprinkler heads to concern myself with, and take them off. I actually have been mowing with AG's, which help me on slopes.

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sammiefish

we have plenty of snow in the winter and wet grass in the summer.

I run weights and chains year 'round... I never get stuck...

as for loading... I would not, as the corrosion issue scares me.

either way... be nice to your tractor... its not a race car... you'll be fine

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RickS

Josh,

I run AG's and 2 link chains in the winter. Without the chains I could not clear my driveway or the private road. I have found AG's to work better for me when I am pushing the banks back. But in general I don't find there is much difference between the AG's and Turfs.

My private road ends up having hard packed snow for its winter base. Without chains I could not climb the hills on this road on my tractors.

I do prefer the AG's for working with stone dust, gravel, and loam during the summer. Unlike Ray I don't have a spare set of rims and tires so I run AG's all year round.

Rick........

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RayS

Ag`s or turfs the chains are doing all the work since they are the only thing with ground contact. It never snows here. Josh is 75 miles north of me and he was up to his neck in it last year. Chris is another 125 - 150 miles north of Josh so I can just imagine the PIA that he has to deal with. I hunted up there for 15 years and they always had snow. They are both a lot closer to lake Michigan than me also, so they get lake affect.

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perry
quote:Originally posted by sispro

Well I think I made up my mind and going to trade or sell the weights and find me a set of v cleats 2 link spacing tire chains.


id="quote">
id="quote">The cleated chains is what i use in my gravel drive . and 22lb factory weights on either tire. remember the tire needs to have some give. too much weight in extreme snowplowing will do damage. i broke my first axle tube last year with fluid fild tires and cleated chains. second year i used these tires . i got them they were already filled. once i broke the axle tube i checked the tire weight and they were close to 60lbs a piece. i drained them down to 25lbs.

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HubbardRA

I don't have wheel weights or loaded tires on any of my tractors. If we get a deep snow and I need weight, I will use hang-on weights. I only add the amount that is needed, no more. I don't like overloading the axle tube with wheel weights or loaded tires. If a wheel wants to spin, then I will let it, instead of overloading an axle tube and causing a fracture.

I believe in setting the tractor up for the specific usage. I don't believe that one setup will fit all needs. I have different tires and different weight setups on each of my tractors, depending on what I am using them for. I do not have wheel weights, fluid, or chains on any of my setups. If I needed to use turf tires in snow(which I don't), then I would need to break out the chains.

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