Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

sb64

Loader Ideas

Recommended Posts

sb64

O.K. next summer I will be building a loader for my 64' landlord.For the main uprights, I am planning on using 2"x4" rectangle stock 3/16" gauge. And for the arms going to the bucket, 1 1/2"x2 1/2" rectangle stock also 3/16" gauge. I'm not sure what length hydraulic cylinders to use, 16" or 24" My other idea is wether I should spend more money on a double spool valve and another cylinder to have hydraulic tilt, or should I spend less and have a trip bucket. None of these dimensions are finalized, so please comment on anything I did or didn't mention.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Talntedmrgreen

I'd shop for surplus hydraulics and go for a hydraulic bucket. A trip bucket will get you by for moving stuff, but a hydraulic bucket is so much more useful and efficient. You will not regret it.

Also, a bit of personal opinion. I think Simplicity had the right idea when they had Henry Loader build their loaders without down pressure (double acting lift cylinders)...down pressure is great and extremely useful, but these are not heavy enough tractors for the added stress that is possible with down pressure from a loader. If you need to dig, you need a real FEL tractor. If you need to grade, use a midmount grader of earthcavator/box blade. Those are much better suited for an old LL, than wrneching the frame of the tractor with your front tires in the air.

Make sure to bridge the BGB with your subframe, as OEM and other club members have done in their designs. If your frame is already cracked adjacent to the BGB, which is very common on those machines, take the time to reinforce that area. I did so on my loader/tractor restoration, and kept all the welds inside the frame and maintained a clean exterior appearance at the same time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sb64

Thanks for the ideas, I wouldn't mind hydraulic tilt fir a lot of reasons. I will not be overusing this tractor at all. It is mainly a light-duty toy. It seems like all their is is double acting cylinders, where do I look for single acting?

And PM sent Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GLPointon

I love haveing downward force, using double acting cylinders for both the boom & bucket. A bit more cost upfront but a more useable machine.

BUT, Josh has a good point too. The FDTs are not really built for tough/hard digging work so maybe go lighter for small utility jobs at home...but still very useful!

Good luck sm01

let me know if I can provide any dimensions from my Kwik-way loader

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
huffy

I agree with Josh; trying to use double acting cylinders to add down pressure is just asking for trouble.

Also, I can't recall off the top of my head but it seems to me that the arms on the Henry loaders are thinner than 3/16". Frankly, those loaders were too heavy for those little tractors to begin with. It's hard to turn them, even without a load in the bucket. If you start using thicker/heavier steel in your design, you're really going to have problems unless you add power steering, imo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sb64

O.K. thanks I'm really considering possibly holding off until I find out more info, and maybe I might just wait until i find on instead of build one. Besides, I am planning on restoring the tractor first, and I don't want to hurt anything later on. Thank you everyone for you comments/feedback I guess I have a lot to think about sm00

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Architectdave

My design uses double acting cylinders and 1/8" 2x3 tubing, it doesn't need to be too heavy and I think as long as the sub frame can take the weight you would be hard pressed to damage anything unless you abuse it....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
colincox1

I've only just recently used a loader on a simplicity, SunStar 20 hp which is a different size machine altogether but I would have to say the downward pressure with the bucket is an absolute must. I would also have to say another must it have a float valve so that when you put the bucket on the ground it is staying there resting under its own weight downwards while you drive forward so that you can pick things cleanly up from the floor. I hope that makes sense. And also another thing need to get some form of gauge to know that when you put the bucket down on the ground that the bucket is level not with the bucket tilting up not with it tilting down but level that also helps with picking up cleanly off the ground. It also stops it from digging in as well or coming up with an empty bucket.

Since I've had this loader I have used it for so many different things, I put the garage doors back up on the runners, far too heavy to do that any other way that I could think of, maybe three sets of stepladders two guys and lever bars. Used it to lift the shingles upon to the garage roof, with the help of the frame to raise it that extra bit of height that I needed. It also acted as a table preparing all the shingles before lifting them up. Pulling up volunteer trees strike saplings. Oh and what I bought it for putting in a 25' x 25' parking lot 8 inches deep, dig out, with 8 inches of stone. And a 60 foot for foot wide path way 6 inches deep dig out and replace with stone. And similar for an area or outside the front of the house. Tidying up a load of trees which were playing down in the storms, moving a log pile. Moving a part of rubble, clearing out some woodland. Rescuing the Bobcat leo Zero turn, PTO clutch went bad and then the interlock stopped it from running, hooked a chain on the back of the zero turn onto the loader and reversed all the way back into the workshop so I could work on the zero turn, there is no release valves to allow towing the Bobcat. Lifting up a trailer and putting it on bricks for winter storage, that site will all work, none of that dragging jacks from the workshop all the way up to the barn and then taken them all the way back.

Anyway don't put off your project too long load is a just far too useful

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
huffy

SS isn't just a different size machine, but a different design altogether. It has a solid frame, unlike the fdt's that join the frame to the tranny with a delicate bgb. Like Josh said, I think down pressure on an fdt loader might cause problems, even with the sub frame. But, I could be wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GLPointon

I'm sold on the Allis 300-400 series to mount a "heavier duty" loader onto. They are the only tractors (smaller than a Powermax or Sunstar) that has a frame that overlaps the BGB.

but I'm not impartialsm01

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×