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Brigs flywheel

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fishnwiz

There is a tool made that slips over the end of the crank shaft after you remove the nut that holds the flywheel on. The tool is used to prevent damage being done to the threads on the end of the crank. If you have a large rubber mallet or a raw hide or lead hammer, a few good blows to the end of the crank will be enough to knock the flywheel loose. Another item I have used in the past is a deep socket with a large nut inside the socket. Slip the nut into the socket and slide the socket over the threaded end of the crank shaft making sure that the socket is not touching the flywheel.This will protect the threads from being damaged. Give the back of the socket a few smart blows from a hammer and the flywheel should come loose.

Good luck.

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Multiplicity

.

...You should REFRAIN from hammering Crankshafts and Flywheels

as much as possible as it shocks and decreases the Magnetism

in the Flywheels, and could even dislodge Magnets on "Glued Up Flywheels"...Use "Bolt Type Pullers" for less stress to break

the flywheel/crankshaft junctures loose......

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timflury

Dennis is right.

I use an old steering wheel puller to pop flywheels off.

I have, in the past, and ONLY in a pinch, have used two ball pein hammers to break the taper. Put the ball end of one hammer on the countersink, and give it a whack. It should pop off with only ONE swing of the hammer.

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fishnwiz
quote:Originally posted by Multiplicity

....You should REFRAIN from hammering Crankshafts and Flywheelsas much as possible as it shocks and decreases the Magnetismin the Flywheels, and could even dislodge Magnets on "Glued Up Flywheels"...Use "Bolt Type Pullers" for less stress to break the flywheel/crankshaft junctures loose......


id="quote">
id="quote">Guess I have been doing it wrong for last 30 years ( 75-100 flywheels)and never one time has a magnet become demagged that I was aware of... Guess I have been lucky...my mistake!:IFYI...Steering wheel pullers are available for FREE TO USE from most auto supply stores!

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briggsetc

DITTO !!

But I have only been doing it the wrong way 25 years.

I would never strike a flywheel, any where, unless I intend to scrap it.

Get yourself a nice piece of brass maybe 1" round x 6" to protect the crank threads. It will not hurt the threads and usually pops the flywheel right off on the first good whack.

If that does not work after 3 or so tries and you have puller holes in the flywheel you need to try a puller.

Anything beyond this will probably require flywheel replacement.

Gary

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MrSteele

DITTO!! as well, for around 45 years. I have usually used 2 screwdrivers placed carefully to avoid wiring behind the flywheel, one wedged between the engine and flywheel, the other in my hand, both pulling out on the handles. A sharp whack on the end of the shaft, and the flywheel is off. Hammer used is whatever I pick up, usually either brass or rubber

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CleanBee

I also have used a prybar or large screwdriver to hold the flywheel from behind. Dont hold it near the magnet. Use enough pressure to pull it up/over and remove the lash. I put the nut on loose and below the cranks end, to catch the flywheel. A swift wack with a brass or lead mallot on the end of the crank. Usually they come off very easily with one hit. I have done this to a lot including aluminum and never caused a chip or hurt a thing.

Although, I would use a puller made for this if I had one.

Dan

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