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rickpilgrim

738 Broadmoor and rear weight ratings

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rickpilgrim

On our 738 Broadmoor w/ snowblower just how much weight can I safely hang on the back? As we have no 8" wheel weights but plenty of 12" ones can I safely hang 130 or so lbs off the rear hitch area without breaking a bunch of stuff?

Thanks

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timflury

The 8" weights go about 25# each.

The rear weight is about 40#.

There are the ultra rare collars that fit on the rear weight that go about 20# each.

So, not including the weight of the driver, There is about 130# that was available from Simplicity to put on the rear of your machine.

Now we all know that you could fill the rear tires with fluid to add weight, and the wheel weights do add weight, but it is "unsprung" weight, so we aren't compromsing axles to the point of bending by overloading the tractor. I also imagine that the rims would bend first where the axle sleeve meets the center of the rim.

You will more than likely create a fulcrum on the rear axle when adding too much weight to the rear.

I had a tiller on the rear of my Serf once, and the front end got quite light when the tiller was in the air.

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Talntedmrgreen

According to the '67 price list, the 8" wheel weight, 12" wheel weight, and collar (doughnut) weight each weight 25#. A rear weight for a small frame is 46#. I'd say you are safe to hang as much back there as you want...but direction changes with lots of weight to stop and go, will wallow out your axle pin holes faster, I'd think.

I'm with Tim...your nose will get awful light too, especially with any front mounted implement on the ground. You will find it nearly impossible to steer. Last year I had wheel weights, a rear weight, and two collars on my Serf. I basically immobilized myself...couldn't steer when pushing snow, and couldn't steer on any slick surface, even with the blade up. Sure looked cool though! And it hooked up like nobody's business and pushed like a D9.

Here's my buddy after a brew or three, trying it out. It takes a bit of getting used to, and you have to kinda feather the manual lift so you can get enough front tire pressure to steer. A blower would have your arm sore in no time.

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rickpilgrim

Well today I made a weight bracket out of a 2" channel iron and some 1/4"x2" strapping. The channel rests on the hitch with a 4" long strap welded to it @90 degrees drilled and bolted to the hitch hole and the channel goes 9 1/2" up. I bent 2 other strap pieces to go from the seat pan supports back to the channel and put a spreader bar between them at the tractor end to avoid bending the seat supports. To this I took some 1/2" threaded rod and tried 2-65lb JD wheel weights. I ended up with just 1 however as dumping the clutch in 2nd lifted the front end, snowblower and all.

I run tubes in the smaller tires like this so fluid is basically not an option. The next time I run to the local fleet and farm store I will see if they have any of the plastic MTD 8" wheel weight kits out yet. They are cheap and you are just buying empty plastic shell that you fill with sand or? and would likely work for this.

The 738 I have has a few changes the first is the 10 hp Briggs, the second is the 2" extended out pto arm on the idler pulleys due to the first and lastly it has both rear wheels that are bolt on on both sides. Along the way the pin holes must have went bad, someone welded a second pipe over the first and uses a 7/16" pin that fits VERY tightly so that should be ok.

Thanks for the good advise all

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timflury
quote:Originally posted by Talntedmrgreen

A blower would have your arm sore in no time.


id="quote">
id="quote">Believe it or not Josh, the 27" blower isn't as heavy as you might think. Just like your buddy plowing, you have to add some weight to the front tires if you want to steer with the blower down.I'm fortunate that my driveway is straight and square so there's not much turning I do when throwing snow into the neighbor's yard. LOLMy weights come into play the most when I'm climbing the slip formed curb at the bottom of my driveway next to the street. I prolly could use a little more weight because I have to lean back to get the most traction to climb the curb.There is a learning curve to these little tractors, when the power is used correctly, they are just as capable as a larger machine, your video clip proves that point.The first winter I had my blower on, I had a lot of trouble overloading and killing the engine. I had to learn the limits of the machine and I can't believe how well the blower works when it is used correctly.,,,,, Oh, and a hi lo certainly helps with the snowblowing chore.

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