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PeppyDan

I got a piece of my history today!

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PeppyDan

A few weeks ago my dad called me and asked if I would be interested in buying an old two wheeled tractor from his brother. I immediately knew he was talking about the David Bradley that my grandpa had back when I was a kid. I told him I was trying to cut down on my collection and didn't think I wanted it. I thought about it and started asking dad more questions about it to find out grandpa bought it NEW from Sears & Roebucks back in the early 50's. I also found that he purchased it without tires which I'm guessing were still a little difficult or expensive to get after the war. In his purchase were a cultivator and a sickle bar mower and possibly a set of tire chains, all of which were still with the tractor in addition to a homemade potato plow. After realizing all the history of this machine and being told that it would get sold outside of the family if I didn't want it I decided I needed to buy it and a deal for $80 was struck which is what my uncle Jim said he had in it including some tires he got for it years ago because the car tires grandpa put on it were rotten. Today we were able to get the deal finished and I heard many stories of the many times grandpa used it and the memories of both my dad and my uncle whether it be sitting on the hood for extra weight while potato plowing or needing to get the Ferguson 30 tractor(also bought new and still in dads hands) to pull it out of a wash-out in the ditch that grandpa got a little too close to while cutting down weeds! When we were all finished loading it uncle Jim opened a drawer and started looking for any paperwork he may have for it (which he didn't think he had) and found the original setup/ operating instructions for the tractor and the operating and maintenance instructions for the engine still in the original Sears, Roebuck and Company envelope. This was just icing on the cake for me and though it has not been started in 20-25 years I think it will run with very little work. My plans are definitely NOT to restore it but simply clean it up, occasionally use it and bring it to some local shows along with a little sign with some of the history of this machine!

I tried to load photos but doesn't seem to be working at the moment:(B)

Dan

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PeppyDan

Thanks for the great comments! I know it is a "Super Power" built in the early fifties and has the early 2 1/4hp Briggs & Stratton model 8 engine but I don't know how to decode the serial number on this engine to nail down the exact year. Can anyone help with the exact year?

Thanks,

Dan

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rokon2813

from here;

http://members.lsol.net/GOP4EVR/tractors.htm

Model 917.57560

"Super Power"

Manufactured from 1951 to 1953

Hooded tractor with red chassis and green wheels ("Super Power" decal on hood)

Briggs and Stratton 500.702052 @ 2-1/4 hp (early) or 500.108022 @ 2-1/2 hp (late)

(Briggs model 8)

One piece frame

Ball lock clutch

The 57560 was the first of the "Super Power" tractors. The engine was upgraded to a Briggs & Stratton model 8, which represented a 30% increase in horsepower. The engine on the early models was the 500.702052, which looked nearly identical to the earlier Briggs engines. It had the same flywheel shroud with the rounded top. The big difference was the piston size was increased from 2" to 2.25". The later engine was mechanically identical, but it had the more modernized appearance with the squared off shroud top common to all the newer Briggs engines of the period.

To handle the extra power and increase reliability, a new clutch was introduced. Previous clutches were engaged by spring pressure only. The ball lock clutch used no springs. There was a set of ball bearings captured between a tapered cone and sleeve on the clutch shaft. Lateral pressure on the cone wedged the balls into the sleeve, which applied pressure to the clutch pressure plate. When adjusted properly, the cone/sleeve/balls would lock up into a solid unit when engaged, resulting a more positive clutch pressure that would lock in the engaged position without the use of springs. These clutches tended not to be as smooth to engage as a spring clutch, but they were much less prone to slipping when adjusted properly. Adjustment was achieved by rotating the outer pressure plate on the threaded hub, which was pinned to the shaft of the gearcase. This moved the pressure plate nearer to (or farther from) the other half of the clutch. The threads on the hub were interrupted by flats where a set screw would secure the adjustment.

Early versions of the 57560 used the same 16" wheels as the 5752 and 5756, but 15" wheels became available later in the production run. Either type rim may be found on this model. Just as a side note, nearly all of the 15" rims had the David Bradley standard 3-hole lug pattern at the center, but occasionally a set of 5-hole 15" rims shows up. Either is correct, and which one was mounted to a particular tractor may have been an availability issue. I believe the 5-hole rims were made primarily for use on larger David Bradley farm equipment (wagons, side rakes, etc.). The tire size for the 15" rims was 6.70x15, and the common rubber was the Allstate Ag tread tire.

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PeppyDan
quote:Originally posted by rokon2813

There is no "decoding" it without a chart.Fortunately, here is the chart. I can't read the serial in the picture, but it looks like March 1951.http://www.asecc.com/data/briggs/data4.html#8


id="quote">
id="quote">That is awesome! Thank you and you are correct with the date of March of 1951. the serial number is 70776.I got most of my other information from the other link you posted but thanks for the link!Dan

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PeppyDan

It is still all original with the exception of the tool box and a very cool choke spring and wire which allowed grandpa to open and close the choke without needing the open the hood. Uncle Jim said there was nothing wrong with it when parked aside from the tires not holding air very long, it was just no longer used and it still has great compression. I am going to give it a thorough cleaning, tune up and lube so it can last another 60 years8D!

Dan

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B10Dave

Lucky that you were given first option Dan. Machine is in nice shape for its age. Tires and a clean up will do wonders. Now you need to build a sulky so you can use it at shows as a butt buggy.....Dave

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PeppyDan
quote:Originally posted by B10Dave

Lucky that you were given first option Dan. Machine is in nice shape for its age. Tires and a clean up will do wonders. Now you need to build a sulky so you can use it at shows as a butt buggy.....Dave


id="quote">
id="quote">Yea, I feel lucky to have it but the reality of it was that if I didn't want it, a guy that buys and sells DB's would have bought it for $100 and probaly parted it out. A downfall of this model compared to the Simplicity models was this only has one speed so the only option would be to change pulley sizes to change speeds.Dan

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GLPointon

That is a very cool bit of history...and his-story

My grandpa had a 2 wheeler in his old garden shed my whole childhood. I wish I was old enough to get it when the homested was sold...nice save, thanks for sharing dOd

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PeppyDan

Thanks again for all the nice comments. This tractor has definitely brought back many memories of grandpa and all the time I spent with him growing up. He and grandma were only about two blocks from mom & dad so we spent a lot of time over there and as I got older, my dad, brother and I stored our cars, tractors, camper, plows, and parts in his barns. We learned to hide the old stainless trim pieces that went on our 60's era cars because grandpa did not understand the value or rarity in some of them and had used a few of them to dress up the edges of yard trailers he built from wood. My brother and I would just cringe when we would see it but never said anything to him because we felt that was the price of free storage.LOL

Dan

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TimJr

Good story, good save. I remember back in the early 1980's my dad selling my grandpa's David Bradley walking tractor. Had a dozer blade, disc/cultivator set up. It just didn't get used much and likely needed some work and at the time wasn't worth spending money on. It's been hard to pass up some I have seen for sale, but I just don't have the space without getting rid of a tractor. My dad used it as a kid to do about 1 full acre of garden, and plow snow in the winter. Memories that are probably good now, but back then was just work. Tim

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