Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
dhoadley

Briggs exhaust

Recommended Posts

dhoadley

I have a generator that I want to run in my garage and plumb the exhaust out the wall. There's a pipe between the block and the muffler that, if I got another one, I could mate them together with 2 bolts and a gasket and be on my way. Part #864A below:

B&S326437-2563-01exhaust.gif

This simple looking chunk of iron is $30! Any alternative ideas?Thanx, DaveP.S. I seem to be having troubles posting a direct pic. Here's the link. http://www.briggsandstrattonpartstore.com/?gclid=COK47dbF1bsCFejpwgodjm0AgA#/Briggs_%26_Stratton/326437-2563-01/Muffler%2c_Shields/326437256301/61790012

57e059071d2a3_BS326437-2563-01exhaust.gif.1e9a73f5e832a930dac4eadf64f60d8b.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brettw

The Briggs exhaust outlet is simple pipe thread. I would use standard pipe and fittings. Two nipples and a union will accomplish what you want, for probably less than $15. Your local hardware store should have what you need, and then some. You could use all different types of fittings to properly accomplish what you want to do then, 45 and 90 elbows, etc.

The only item you may need to think about, depending upon what you are actually attempting to do and how far you are piping, is some type of flexible link in the system. You may need something like a corrugated steel section of exhaust pipe, to accommodate vibration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rokon2813

Like Brett Said above. Standard pipe from any hardware store.

If you want to use the existing muffler, unscrew 864A from the block, and use it on the outside end.

To go straight out the wall, you would need a pipe of desired length to screw into the block and go through the wall, then a union, then your part.

Add any bends you need to make with 90 degree fittings and additional lengths of pipe.

For long distances, electrical conduit may work better and cheaper clamped over a pipe nipple at the block and your fitting outside.

Flexible exhaust pipe is available at most good auto parts stores too.

Biggest thing to remember is don't hang too much weight off the block, support the pipe in some way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dhoadley

It's a portable generator that I thought I could simply roll up to the wall-mounted exhaust, remove the muffler to the pipe and attach that pipe to the rest of the piping. When I was finished, reverse it and have a portable again. It just looked easier to remove the muffler than remove the pipe. I was planning on using standard piping as you have suggested, just wanted a convenient way to hook up and unhook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GrincheyOne

Another strategy to reduce back pressure is to; either use "street L's" in place of standard 90 degree elbows, another trick is to increase the diameter of the exhaust as you increase it's length.

A good muffler shop, or local rod shop, would have the hydraulic bending equipment to create a custom bent piping run. I would suggest a bend radius not less than 3 x the pipe diameter.

Wayne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bud119195

Does your generator have a round muffler?is so why not get a piece of exhaust pipe that will fit over your muffler and stick it through the wall ? that way you can leave muffler on generator and pull it out and use as needed and not have to keep taking muffler on and off

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrSteele

Depending on the muffler configuration, I'd agree with Bud. Get a piece of sheetmetal to place over the muffler and simply back the muffler into the rigged housing, that is piped to the outside. Be careful the first few runs if using galvanized sheetmetal, at least til the galvanizing is burned off. That gas is deadly to most living critters, you included. You just need to pipe your newly made housing to outdoors, use a muffler clamp or similar to attach the housing to your muffler....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dhoadley

The garage was added 60 years ago to a "postage stamp" property in the center of town. It shares about 6 feet of wall with the house but isn't attached in the way you might think. It would be a detached garage if I had the land. You must leave the house, go outside, and enter the garage. The exhaust is as shown in the link #864A attaching to #300D. There's a threaded pipe and then a 2-bolt muffler mounted. What I had hoped to do is unbolt the muffler, leave the pipe and bolt it to the wall mounted exhaust. I'm thinking of using a "pipe floor flange" with an exhaust gasket. I'll take pictures if I ever get it set up. Thanx, Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrSteele

Properly sealed bonnet/housing/piping arrangements will keep the carbon monoxide where it belongs..outside the garage. What I think you are trying to do is make this a simple connection to save time connecting and/or removing. Unless you gasket the housing/piping/muffler arrangement, which will take time to be certain it is installed and sealed against leakage, then yes, you are installing a perfect suicide machine.

Doing the job properly will not include the word quick. Any and all joints in the piping inside the garage will need to be tested for leaks each time you set up the generator, or, build a housing that is completely sealed that houses the piping, that is also vented to the outside, through the wall. When I use my generator, with a connection to my panel in the garage, I leave the east facing door open, or open a couple of windows to allow for ventilation, and that is on my detached garage.

I fed the garage from the house, leave circuits on for refrigerator, freezer and a few lights, throw the main, then start the generator in the garage to feed that small load. Has worked fine for a couple of outages.

With a postage stamped yard, you have little space. I would build a removable/temporary roof on 4 legs that can be placed over the generator, and leave it outside in the drive, or adjacent to the walk you might have between the house and garage. With folding legs, the roof system can easily be stored in an attic or against the wall when not in use. Then, the words quick and easy enter the picture again, and carbon monoxide problems never enter the picture at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    • gwiseman
    • Sovereignm88
    • rbstuartjr
    • CarlH
    • SmilinSam
    • victorsnc
    • Simple Guy
    • tripleguy
    • simplewrench
    • Talntedmrgreen
  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Recent Status Updates

    • KSever

      KSever  »  SmilinSam

      How you been stranger?
      · 3 replies
    • jbrooks

      jbrooks  »  Talntedmrgreen

      Josh
       
      folowing  this from a link at the downloads.  I just rescued an AC 920 with the lambodini diesel. I can' t download  yet .  Where did you find the PDF copy you posted. . I would like to figure out how to adjust the injection pump. 
      I assume it's a bosche, correct
      · 0 replies
  • Adverts

×