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ketchk

Landlord starting in 10 degree weather

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ketchk

I use my 1964 Landlord for plowing in winter new plug, points, condenser and battery in 60 to 90 degree weather it might turn over twice before firing up. in the weather we are having now it takes 4 or 5 squirts of starting fluid and a jumper battery it cranks , spits our of the carb and exhaust i have to crank at least 30 times to get it to fire im using 5/30 oil i was thing a oil pan heater or something last snow i ended up using a snow blower since i could not get it i to start any ideas other than moving to Florida

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MPH

When I still had to park my snow removing tractors outside I puller the ole Briggs out and installed a glue on oil pan heater on them. About an hour plugged in with a blanket thrown over the hood they'd start like summer time. Also run Amsoil gear lube in them.

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Talntedmrgreen

I have no issues starting my 7-12hp briggs engines even below zero. None are heated or in an insulated garage. My 16 can be a bear.

You may have to adjust your fuel screws....cold air is dense and the engine may want more fuel to compensate. If you are at a very low elevation it may compound the lean condition.

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donmoore1904

I'd also vote for checking the carb mixture. The last few years I have had cold weather starting that required extended cranking of my 10hp B&S to start. There were other indications I had a mixture issue, since I had to run it with the choke for a few minutes and it stumbled on throttle increase. A little tweaking on a warm (40 degree) day eliminated this. Starts fine in cold weather now, and choke only needed for 10-15 seconds. Except for this experience, overall I have been very impressed with how cold weather really doesn't create a cranking issue for my Landlord. Good luck.

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dav

the "move to Florida" idea may not be so good. we are going to be around 30 degrees Tuesday. I know, I know...30 degrees seems like a heat wave to you up north. but it's gonna raise heck with our vegetation. won't be as green all winter as usual. at least it will thin out the geckos.

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MPH

Andy, problem with the magnetic ones is the engine sits a half inch or so above the frame. Not much heat gets to the ole briggs. Will work better if you slide a glue on one under from the front of the tractor and wedge it up with a piece of metal and some wood shims under that to wedge it as tight as possible. I didn't like the wood under the heater but it worked until it wormed up to above zero the first year I had the 725.

Somewhere filed away on this site is an oil test I did at 40 belowish year ago, 5W-30 gets pretty stiff, Amsoil won out by far.

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dentwizz

I would vote for low compression either from worn rings or valve seating. When my 64 had worn rings it did that and would smoke like crazy when cold. New rings and it would start with a slap of the button.

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ketchk

I did a compression test and got 50 pounds so it is low i just hope it will last the winter as i have no heat in my tent/ the carb is a thought last time after plowing for about a hour the engine started to bog down and stall i leaned the mixture and it started to run fine again. if i remember turning in is to make it richer and turn out to make it leaner Andy

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RayS

If you know you have a head gasket leak. Pull the head and check for carbon build up. Maybe a piece of carbon holding a valve open. You say you have no smoke. So it shouldn`t be burning oil. If the rings are worn out it would be using oil.

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dentwizz

Usually. I've had broken compression rings and worn ones act that way with almost no smoke as long as the oil ring was intact.

Andy- turning it out is richer because it opens the fuel flow. In any event, if a given direction fixes it it's fixed :D

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BLT

A magnetic oil pan heater might not work on the Briggs as it has an aluminum pan. And if you don't have the heating area if the heater clamped on you stand a chance of burning out the heater element. Been there. I woul take my chances with a cheap hair drier and turn it on low and cover engine compartment. If drier element gets hot drier shuts down to cool and the restarts.

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Chris727

My B-110 cranked and started just fine yesterday. The tractor has been sitting outside. I'm running 10W-30 and a cheap Rural King battery. I think it was around 15-20 degrees. Yes at 50 lbs compression that is part of your problem. The usual guideline is about 70 PSI to run, and about 90-120 to be in decent running condition.

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MikeES

This is a trick that I use on my B&S engines. The tractor always starts on the first rotation even when below zero weather. If I don't do this it has to crank over at least 20 to 30 times to start.

This is the trick: Put the throttle in the slowest position. Pull the choke. Reach over and hold close the the throttle, against the idle stops (front of carburetor) with your left hand while you turn the starter, hold it close for a second or so. I use my right had to push the choke part way in. You will get the hang of how long to hold the throttle close before letting the throttle lever knob take over. Only a few of seconds.

If you have the heat shield on, it will be difficult to do this with gloves on.

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richp
quote:Originally posted by MikeES

This is a trick that I use on my B&S engines. The tractor always starts on the first rotation even when below zero weather. If I don't do this it has to crank over at least 20 to 30 times to start.This is the trick: Put the throttle in the slowest position. Pull the choke. Reach over and hold close the the throttle, against the idle stops (front of carburetor) with your left hand while you turn the starter, hold it close for a second or so. I use my right had to push the choke part way in. You will get the hang of how long to hold the throttle close before letting the throttle lever knob take over. Only a few of seconds.If you have the heat shield on, it will be difficult to do this with gloves on.


id="quote">
id="quote"> Thats funny, I thought I was the only one doing that. Heck, might have learned it from you years ago. Only difference is I keep the choke off. It's a good way to get the oil moving before rpm's come up.

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ketchk

Well its been 10 to 15 below 0 in NJ last few days just got my magnetic oil pan heater this afternoon. could not wait to try it out I plugged it in and went inside for one hour. went back out and did not expect much in fact did not even sit in my seat just put chock on and turned the key. groan groan and fired right up. now it might be a fluke but that the most easy start in 2 months. So far im VERY HAPPY will keep all posted as ill try again tomorrow

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timflury

Here's some more ideas.

For those that drape a blanket over the tractor, an electric charcoal starter would get some heat moving without burning up the element.

One could also use a heat gun, or a hair dryer.

Also, a simple drop light on a cord placed on the floor should bring the heat up in the engine compartment.

These methods kinda freak me out being a fire hazard and all, so keep a close eye on your process.

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donmoore1904
quote:Here's some more ideas.

For those that drape a blanket over the tractor, an electric charcoal starter would get some heat moving without burning up the element.

One could also use a heat gun, or a hair dryer.

Also, a simple drop light on a cord placed on the floor should bring the heat up in the engine compartment.

These methods kinda freak me out being a fire hazard and all, so keep a close eye on your process.


id="quote">
id="quote">Slightly tangental to the topic, but for my 23hp diesel Massey, I use a spare 1500W strip wall heater on a piece of romex (not exactly UL listed). In 15 degree weather, put a blanky on top, leave it for an hour and she starts right up. However, my 7010 is far easier to start and needs no heater in equivalent conditions.

All your suggestions would work great, but I'd rather sit on my couch than hold a heat gun or hair dryer. I guess a holding rig could be constructed.

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ketchk

Mike ES ill give that a try its been in the 30s to 50s here in jersey last few weeks I know i have to pull the head when it warms up i have used a Leak Down gauge on quite a few engines in the past and think they really help find out why low compression is happening. last time i was working on a Briggs OHV engine had to replace head gasket and dressed the valves put back on still a small valve leak pulled it off again redid valves again and got it to almost no leak at all i love working on OHV engines the L head is a lot harder in my opinion Andy

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DMKNLD

I replaced the condenser on my Kohler K-series engine with a Kirk engines 'Point Saver' ignition transistor, http://www.kirkengines.com/index.php#PointSaver , which reduced the starting voltage needs considerably, which has helped allot on -20 F start ups of recent. Disclaimer - I have no financial or promotional connection to Kirk Engines, other than Dave Kirk being personable and professional in his on-line customer service - I had my part in hand w/in a few days of ordering.

I had to fix my compression issues from a burnt exhaust valve and partially blown head gasket as well.

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ketchk

To good to be true. well here in Jersey we just had about 4 days of 0 temp. Snowed last night about 8 inches so this morning put my oil pan heater on for about 1 Hr. tried to start and a very slow grone grone grone. to cold even to crank over. and with a new battery then i remembered i have a torpedo heater stashed some where.after a hour of looking with wife she found it and with kero still in it. fired it up pointing at tractor about 8 feet away after 1 hour the engine was warm to the touch hit the key and presto plow time . So i must say the oil pan heater dose work in cold but not sub freezing weather. cant beat a jet engine that blows fire. just have to be careful. I dont like fire and gas

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