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DMKNLD

rubber vs 2 link chains on blacktop

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DMKNLD

Finally got my tractor running right for the first 'seat time' of the winter, but had a problem last night clearing our latest New England snow storm. I resealed the driveway this past fall, which made the blacktop allot smoother, so even with 2 link chains and a 100 lb rear counterweight plus my 160+ lbs on the seat I couldn't back up my sloped blacktop driveway w/o spinning the wheels on my 7114 tractor.

Blowing snow going up the driveway is no problem with traction, but it means I have to do a lot of turning around and redirecting the snow throwing pattern, which I can only blow to one side of the driveway.

Will the rubber style chains work better on the sealed blacktop?

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BLT

I'm having good results with ATV tires. I do one other driveway that has a sharper angle then the one across the street and get along with it fine. Admitedly the surface has been ice free.

Snowwinter12%2022%2013%20c.jpg

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Ronald Hribar

Why is it any different blowing up driveway than blowing down driveway ?

It should be easier to back Dow driveway than to back up driveway

Other than that I think you will have to add a couple of hundred pounds to treat of tractor

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Brettw

Ags. Or as Bob uses, ATV tires. I put a set of loaded Ags on my 7118, and never looked back. On asphalt, chains on a steep enough hill simply spin, and mar up the driveway in the process. I had a few neighbors drives I could not do, until I put the Ags on.

My 2 cents worth.

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DMKNLD

I live on a state highway where cars crank by my driveway, and add to that a blind curve and the high snowbanks we tend to get and I've nearly been picked off on several plowing occasions, even with LED floods on the top of my cab and reflective striping everywhere on it. So I have better visibility at the top of my driveway where it meets the road when I can back up the driveway.

I can make it work backing down and plowing up, but when blowing some deep heavy snow I've almost gotten it stuck going uphill against gravity, and that was when my blacktop had allot more traction before I sealed it.

The chains are tight with the bungee cord / clip tighteners, so that isn't the problem. I'll try to let some air out of the tires to see if that helps.

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Talntedmrgreen

If you are snowblowing, and removing ALL of the snow and ice, you should be able to use plain old turfs. If there is ANY snow or ice on the surface then rubber will slip on it. Period. Chains cannot bite into blacktop as they do in loose soil, snow or ice, and so, they will spin, whereas rubber grips on such surfaces, and vice versa.

It sounds like you're simply battling ballast. Your front is heavier than your rear, and you will clearly lose traction reversing up the hill. Just turn it around and use gravity to your benefit when going up the hill forward. Or try gauge wheels instead of skids on the blower, and when you back up your drive, leave it on the ground to roll and it won't counterbalance your rear end.

My drive is sloped, and if I don't have chains, I have to tow my tractor back to the top...no tire, be it ATV, AG or turf will give me the traction needed during the winter. I can't even back up my drive in my truck without using the 4x4.

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RickS

Josh is right you will need chains to get the tractor up the driveway. But adding more weights (loaded tires or wheel weights) can help.

I run 2-link chains, AG tires, and wheel weights on my 7018 and still struggle on one hill on my road.

Rick.....

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donmoore1904

I am finding this thread quite interesting. I have a gravel driveway and a gravel road, and my 7010 with turfs, chains and wheel weights has great traction. I've been spoiled, and can see with blacktop it could be a whole different story. Just this morning I was thinking I'd lile blacktop at my next house. Unless I move to San Diego or similar or a place with a 20' long driveway, I may rethink that.

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steve-wis

I have turf tires with 2 link chains on my T816 Allis, along with about 60 lbs of weight on each wheel. I have no problem backing up my sloped driveway with the blower raised, but I do have the skid shoes set to leave about 1/8 inch of snow. this thin cover of snow is enough for the chains to bite into so I don't have a problem.

Steve

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GrincheyOne

Denny,

I have yet to try my little 4212G out in the snow (it's under repair). I found earlier this year that the center of gravity is a critical factor, and trying to make up for a 84# 46" blade on front is tricky. I use 2 link chains on turf tires (unfilled) , 2 wheel wts 23# ea., a rear counter weight 62#, and my 164#, the machine stills reacts as it is front heavy.

Perhaps in your case, a weight box would help! I have no where to hang one! I like Josh's idea of gauge wheels or rollers vs skids.

Wayne

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DMKNLD
quote:Originally posted by donmoore1904

Just this morning I was thinking I'd like blacktop at my next house. Unless I move to San Diego or similar or a place with a 20' long driveway, I may rethink that.


id="quote">
id="quote">Like anything it seems, there are both pros and cons to blacktop. I have my skids set to have the scraper bar pretty much right on the ground, which leaves very little snow left on the blacktop, and thus no packed down ice after 3 cars driving up and down on it. By noon today, even on only a 20 degree F 'blue bird' day here in Maine, the higher February sun angle melted what little snow was left on it after snow blowing last night, and it was completely dry by the time the sun set today.But I also blow snow in the front yard of our farmhouse, and I dig up the grass and catch the skids and the scraper bar on the buried walkway field stones if I don't have the blower lifted a bit w/ the electric lift, which is tough to 'fine tune' the blower height with,IMO. On my first light snowfalls of the season I try to just pack the snow down flat with the turf tires so I get a reasonably smooth frozen surface, to minimize catching on the field stones or digging up the yard too bad. The January thaw we had messed with that though. At least my front yard, unlike my driveway is flat.I also like Josh's idea of using roller wheels instead of skids on the blower, which would probably help on both my variable surfaces as well as being able to avoid front loading the tractor by not having to raise the blower when I'm going against gravity. Anyone know where I can order a set of those - Jacks Small Engine maybe ?

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dirtmister16

ive had similar problems with a smooth concrete drive my neighbor has, i find that if i have a little snow or ice im fine.

but i have found if i back up slowly i can back up it but if i leave the throttle high i just spin. otherwise id follow the others suggestions.

sounds like your working on the way up rather then just getting up to move over.

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Ishmael2k

I have a combination of approximately 120' of very steep gravel with 30' of concrete at the top. The only way I can plow is with the following setup on my 7116H:

Loaded ags, 75# weights on each side (billet steel ~2.5" thick), my 310# and 2 link v-bar (quad style) chains. This setup rarely spins on the 'crete even with a lot of snow to push, and I can plow up the driveway(I have to as there is nowhere to take the snow at the bottom).

Until I replaced the normal chains with the v-bar chains I was constantly fighting for traction.

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DMKNLD

Lots of good thoughts on this thread, thanks everybody.

I haven't heard anyone comment on the rubber belt style chains, which according to manufacturers claims are the best option for blacktop or concrete surfaces, claiming better traction and no damage to the surface vs traditional link style chains.

I'd love some feedback from anyone who has used them in 'real world' applications.

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