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dentwizz

Snowblower engineering

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dentwizz

As a question oriented to this year's prevalent snow in the PA area being wet and heavy, what is the correlation between auger speed and effective performance? More specifically, if the auger is spinning fast enough to throw 30-40 ft and it bogs the 16hp engine quickly, does that mean that the auger pulley needs to be larger(reduction) or will that not make an effective difference or negative?

I know the engine has to be full speed ahead, but on a hydro chassis which speed is controllable precisely does the slower auger bite produced by the increased pulley reduction also reduce the rate of flow?

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Ronald Hribar

I see you are not using the stock clutch or pulley

If you can find out what is stock diameter

You should be able to change driven pulley to approxiamate stock ratio

Also on my 7117 with 20 hp magnum. I had option of using electric clutch on motor or stock pto drive. Stock middle pto worked the best

And on my 7116 16 hp Briggs handled all the snow I could push into it

Had a 16 hp Kohler in a JD. That also would handle snow well

So either your motor is not healthy or you have it geared too high

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timflury

The depth and composition of the snow is dictates your ground speed.

Deeper "dry" snow will command a slower forward speed.

ANY wet, heavy snow will have the same effect.

A 2"-3" dusting will allow faster ground speeds.

You want to run with the engine loaded, not overloaded, if so,then it will quickly bog the engine AND the auger and you will not be throwing snow into your neighbors yard anymore.

And of course, treating the leading edge of the auger and the inside of the chute with your favorite lard, bacon grease, carbauba wax, cooking spray, or whatever else you have that the snow will not stick to, will also help.

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Talntedmrgreen

By changing pulley size, you will change auger speed. When you speed it up, you sacrifice torque and the tractor will bog easier. If you're used to fluff, and like to really throw it, speed that baby up. If you're bogging, slow it down to let you engine maintain.

You should be fine at OEM spec.

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dentwizz

Thats the thing, there was no oem spec when I got the unit. I don't know if it was made to be a step up or reduction ratio in relation to the engine, and yes with the hydro I was creeping it as much as it could do with a barely workable flow rate. It is not so much that it is operating poorly as much as it is a thing to improve against a heavy challenge. The 42" blower with a 5/8" belt can make the clutch squeak/slip sometimes under this level of snow, usually right before virtually stalling the engine. 1/2" belts overstress in a couple storms of anything other than northern powder.

In a way that almost becomes a design feature of the electric clutch because it disengages when the regulator drops out, allowing it to fall off and recover the engine momentarily. Mind you that point is so slow that I can count the pulses readily, so not a factor of concern. It just seems that it could do better.

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RickS

One thing that has not been mentioned is depending on the amount of snow and the wetness of the snow you may need to take a smaller bite of the snow.

After the first pass instead of taking a full bite of snow try only 3 quarters or half a blower full.

The key as already mentioned is the keep the motor running at full speed without bogging down. It is a balance; each snowfall and each pass will require a different speed and bite.

Rick......

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dentwizz

The main place where it becomes an issue is the first bit of getting out to the road. My township plows a pretty high/hard bank about a car wide from the curb sometimes feet deep, which when factored with road salt melting beforehand it can be a real challenge to bust through it. Not only once but 4 driveways since they are close together and elderly owned. But for that amount of work I can go through a very large percent of a tank of fuel(not smoking either) and it seems like there must be a better/more efective ratio.

Ask alluded to earlier, what is the drive ratio on stock?

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