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Chris727

7010 low compression (updated, now running)

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Chris727

I have a 7010 with a K241 Kohler K-Seires. This engine ran good enough to till my garden back in 2009. Since then it had sat and while I worked on replacing the damaged dash/cowl assembly and removed the engine and replaced the stator assembly. After reassembling the machine last fall, it never ran right. It was very hard to start. I had also rebuilt the carb last fall. When it did run it did not smoke but ran somewhat rough. At one point I thought it was amlost OK. Then it would no longer start. I checked the compression and it was only about 30 PSI. From what I have ready you cannot actually read Kohler compression due to the compression release system (ACR). I tested my 912 and it had over 100 PSI and it is an ACR equipped engine. I'm thinking I still need to be reading 70 or better. I took the entire tractor to my machinist and he gave it a valve job. I surfaced the head and reassembled the machine. I now have even less compression with only 28-29 PSI. I'm hoping the gauge is just broke but with the machine not wanting to run I'm suspecting the worst. I'm just amazed that if its really that worn out, how could it run as long as it did and not smoke? Can a compression release break and allow no compression all the time?

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Chris727

Bob, I was of the impression since it was a battery ignition system the timing was adjusted by maintaining the proper breaker point gap. After your timing light suggestion I looked in the manual and sure enought the battery ignition system requires timing also. I never had to do that to a briggs when adding a battery ignition system. At this point it will not run whatsoever so I will have to start with a static-timing procedure. I suppose the timing may have changed when I replaced the flywheel (yes I neglected to mention a fin was broken so I purchased a used replacement flywheel (of unknown origin) This is starting to sound like Mike's Vangaurd mystery.

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donmoore1904
quote:Originally posted by Chris727

Bob, I was of the impression since it was a battery ignition system the timing was adjusted by maintaining the proper breaker point gap. After your timing light suggestion I looked in the manual and sure enought the battery ignition system requires timing also. I never had to do that to a briggs when adding a battery ignition system. At this point it will not run whatsoever so I will have to start with a static-timing procedure. I suppose the timing may have changed when I replaced the flywheel (yes I neglected to mention a fin was broken so I purchased a used replacement flywheel (of unknown origin) This is starting to sound like Mike's Vangaurd mystery.


id="quote">
id="quote">Is this the stock ignition? If so, you physically adjust the coil so that the points just open when a doohicky lines up with a whatchamacallit, if I recall correctly. You have a manual - I had an old timer who was hanging around the Simplicity dealer who told me how to do it. edit -> I can't find a picture or description on the web. Seem to recall there is an arrow on the bracket and a line on the flywheel.Absolutely - this is starting to sound like another story here, one which I don't recall seeing the conclusion of.

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Chris727
Originally posted by donmoore1904
quote:
id="quote">I believe you are referring to the cast-iron briggs engines mag adjusment procedure. This tractor has a Kohler with a 12 volt automtive style coil on it. Its the stock setup for that engine.

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Chris727
quote:Originally posted by Tonyvdb

Could be that the compression is low enough so it just won't start. I have a 10 HP briggs that got so bad it would start, put new piston and rings and starts and runs great now.


id="quote">
id="quote">I would tend to agree but having had the valve job done and surfacing the head, the compression should have increased yet I have a couple pounds less than before. This engine has much less cylinder wear than some of my other runners. I don't know if its because of the compression release that I cannot get a true reading? There is no way this engine had only 30 PSI compression when I tilled the garden with this tractor and nothing was changed internally and no hours or wear accumulated since that time.

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Chris727

Update: I performed a static timing procedure and found the points were maybe .002" too tight. I also adjusted the spark plug gap back to .035" Last fall I had narrowed it up a bit in my experimentation. The engine will pop and barely run. It will run for a second or less if choked. I do not believe it is because of fuel but rather the suction created by closing the choke. The longest it ran was chuging at low RPMs for maybe 4 seconds. I then swapped the carb from my 912 onto it and it behaved exactly the same. This leaves me to believe its either a timing/spark issue or a compression issue.

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donmoore1904
quote:Originally posted by Chris727

I believe you are referring to the cast-iron briggs engines mag adjusment procedure. This tractor has a Kohler with a 12 volt automtive style coil on it. Its the stock setup for that engine.


id="quote">
id="quote">I'm sorry - Maybe I saw "241" and thought of the 243431 B&S. Don't ask me why, b/c 241 isn't even in that number! Perhaps also I assumed you had the B&S since my 7010 does. I obviously need to open my eyes and actually READ next time. Good luck.

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Chris727

UPDATE: The tractor is now running properly. I spoke with one of my local experts on the phone the other night and he suggested I might have the condenser wired to the wrong side of the coil. An inspection revealed that the condenser was wired to the negative side as is proper. It also revealed that the points wire and the battery wires were on the wrong sides. This kept the condensor out of the circuit with the points. I swapped the wires and now its running as good as back in 2009 when I last used the tractor.

Thank you for the suggestions.

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