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ludite13

So many tire choices!

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ludite13

Hi all,

So, my new-to-me B110 is in dire need of new rubber. Like, the tubes are popping out of the cracks in the tread dire need! Anyhow, I mentioned this in my intro thread and one of the guys mentioned tri ribs and ag tires would be cool. Now, I have been searching tires here and around the web and am even more confused about what type to go with. While I think the rib/ag combo would be totally cool, I wonder what they will do to my lawn? I will be using the bee for mowing but also tilling my garden and plowing snow. I don't want to buy any "Hecho en Chine" crap either. I suppose the questions I have are the following:

Is there an ag tread that wouldn't tear up my grass that I can use in the dirt?

Do the tri-ribs provide any traction in snow/grass, or are they only for use in dirt?

I notice a lot of tires are marked "tubeless nowadays. Does that mean I can get away without tubes, or are the original rims going to allow pressure loss?

Any suggestions from those with more experience than me (I have none) with different tire setups are greatly appreciated and I would like to say thanks in advance.

Take care.

-James

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PhanDad

James, I'm sure you'll get a bunch of conflicting answers, so here's mine.

I don't think you'll want to run ags on turf, because they'll mark the lawn since the "bar" part of the tire has little surface area and tends to sink into the ground to get traction. So you should run turfs in the rear; I'm partial to Carlisle turf masters:

http://www.carlisletransportationproducts.com/product/tires/lawn-garden-golf/Ti15

I also run the turf masters in the front, but others run the tri ribs. I've never seen tri ribs on the rear. I'm told the tri ribs provide better turning traction, especially in snow.

In the winter, I run ag tread; I have them mounted on separate rims. Before I bought the ags, I ran chains on the turfs.

I've had more success running tubeless on the rear tires than the front, although I do have some tubeless front tires. Like you said, all depends on the condition of the rim.

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dav

I used turfs with chains and filled with anti-freeze for plowing and blowing. took the chains off for tilling. that was in NH and all I had.

now I'm in florida. I tried ags for tilling but my soil is loose sand and they just dug ruts. so I am back to turfs with wheel weights for tilling, discing and with the mold board. I do all right until I snag a fair sized root, which stops me fast.

I use a 'dutch' blade for dozer work. the turfs don't give much traction so I have to take small bites but they do get it done.

the scottsman(deere) that I mow with does more damage to the lawn than the B-1 dragging my wife on a sulkie and a trailer all over the yard

I paid $85 for tires for my pick up, new from firestone. miller wants $134 for rear tires for my B-1. doesn't seem right to me. found a local tire source but ran into a wall with their 'wholesale' policy. they won't even let me look at their catalog to see if I want to have a retailer order for me

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gwiseman

From what I hear as your desire and needs I'd suggest turf rears & tri-rib fronts like these:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/TWO-New-23X8-50-12-Carlisle-Turf-Master-Tires-4-ply-/380645223605?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item58a0392cb5

http://www.ebay.com/itm/TWO-New-4-00-8-Deestone-D401-Tri-rib-3-Rib-Tires-Tubes-4-ply-Lawn-Tractors-/380734551937?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item58a58c3781

Tri-ribs are tough to mount if you don't have equipment. Check local tire stores for price incl mounting b/f you buy. Remember tires last a long time if you take care of them so get what you want.

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ludite13

All great info, thanks again for the replies! So, Tri ribs in front and turf for the rear is what I am reading... I wonder why the tri ribs would be harder to mount? Is the tread portion of the tire less compliant than a similarly sized studded tire? I am a mechanic by trade and have access to tire machines, but wonder if the front wheels are too small for our equipment to grab.

I kinda thought the ag tires would tear up the lawn (or the subway the moles have built) and aggressive turf tires would be a better match for my uses. Good to hear from some experienced voices that I wasn't so crazy!

Thanks again.

-James

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timflury

You will use tubes on your front tires. Tri-Ribs are tube type tires.

You should have 4/4.80x8 tires on the front.

Also, I don't believe the rim has the little lip needed to help tubeless tires seal the bead.

You can use your rear tire chains on the garden for extra needed traction. Chains are just as good as ag tires.

Gene may be thinking of mounting 16/6.50x8 tri-ribs on the wider front rims.

I'm an ex mechanic as well. Most of the automotive tire machines will handle something as small as a 10" rim. (Think Austin Mini Cooper tires)

Do a search on the site here for tire mounting.

There are plenty of topics regarding tires.

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RayS

I don`t think there is anyone out there that can beat the prices at the link below. I am always told that I need a set of tri ribs up front because I have ag`s in the back. Still haven`t got an answer to as why? I don`t even like the looks of a tri rib:D. Some say they have better traction with a blower. I never had a problem with turfs on the front with a blower and won`t use nothing but turfs on the rear with chains while using a blower (they make chains for the front as well). I don`t see the advantage of tri ribs on a 700# lawn mower.

It`s a to each his own issue and the tri ribs cost as much as four tires or almost. Walmart charges $5 to mount a tire. I would rather watch that guy sweat putting them on than me.

http://www.greaterclevelandtire.com/servlet/StoreFront

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dhoadley
quote:Originally posted by Marty-MN

I use turf tires on the grass and ags every where else the ags are loaded as are some of the turf tires


id="quote">
id="quote">I've always wondered, how do you load liquid into a tire? Thanx, Dave

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ludite13

Hey Dave,

I recall running across a you tube video explaining how to fill tires with liquid. I think you need a special valvestem adapter with a bleeder and a cheap pump with some garden hose and a bucket.

-James

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Brettw

I have found the easiest way to load tires is to lay it on its side, break the bead in one area, and pour the fluid in. Don't fill it 100% and leave room for some air. Put the air to it and reset the bead. That is what I had done. On an old set that the bead hasn't been broken in years, or with tubes, the other options may be the proper choice.

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rokon2813
quote:Originally posted by RayS

I don`t think there is anyone out there that can beat the prices at the link below. I am always told that I need a set of tri ribs up front because I have ag`s in the back. Still haven`t got an answer to as why? I don`t even like the looks of a tri rib:Did="red">. Some say they have better traction with a blower. I never had a problem with turfs on the front with a blower and won`t use nothing but turfs on the rear with chains while using a blower (they make chains for the front as well). I don`t see the advantage of tri ribs on a 700# lawn mower.It`s a to each his own issue and the tri ribs cost as much as four tires or almost. Walmart charges $5 to mount a tire. I would rather watch that guy sweat putting them on than me.http://www.greaterclevelandtire.com/servlet/StoreFront


id="quote">
id="quote">My personal opinion, looks and cool factor :OUnder certain conditions, they will give a little better traction when turning, but for the most part they are not much better.On ice, they are no better than turfs, hardpack a little better.On hard summer ground, no better, spring and fall moist or soft, a little.Soft or worked dirt, or mud, better.Basically, if a good work boot does not leave very noticable tracks, then tri ribs will not be much better.I have run straight tread trailer tires, turf tires, tri-ribs, forward ags and reversed ags on the front plowing and there is not a lot of difference between any of them depending on the conditions.But; I also tend to run too much rear weight, and my differentials are all tighter than factory, so I get more "push" than normal in turns anyway.My personal preference is reversed ags, and I use them year round.And, air pressure makes a major difference with tri-ribs. To work best, they must be at or below recommended pressure. About to the point where they just start to "squat"At that point, on a hard turn they will start to roll sideways, making a "cutting edge" similar to a ski or scag on a snowmobile, then they grip well. Similarly, with reversed ag's, the outside end of the lug will contact the ground first, similar to spikes or studs.

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sb64

Ray, thanks for that cite, i will be ordering my tires through them this summer. I can order a pair of

23x8.50-12 6 Ply Deestone Super Lugs D405 (2 tires) for $97.50

and, a pair of

4.00-8 4 Ply Deestone Super Lugs D402 (2 tires) for $40.50

that's quite a deal!

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fishnwiz

As everything else in life there are just way to many choices. Just thinking about these numerous choices make my head spin! sm00

Best of luck....the membership has given you alot to think about!.

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ss74nova

Here's a youtube video that may help, showing how to change a lawnmower tire. Just be careful putting the last bead on that you don't knick or tear it with a screwdiver. A wider flat rounded edge tool works better here just like Willy said. Putting the first bead on the rim you can usually just angle & spin the tire right onto the rim without any tools. Use lots of dishsoap on the new beads too.

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donmoore1904

Another great thread. Never would have thought of putting tire on the side and breaking the bead to fill them.

I don't have a need for AG tires on my Simplicity, or tri-ribs (these days it is more along the lines of Viagra).

Slightly off topic, I have industrial tires on my Massey TLB (on my dealer's suggestion), which have proved invaluable on my mostly sloped property, and significant use on shale, dirt, and quarry process. When I have used it to just travel on grass, it definitely leaves and impression. Of course, 4wd with any tire will rip up grass.

My neighbor had a larger class Massey, for primarily heavy lawn mowing use, and he had turf tires. As an old farmer, he took it into one of his crop fields once (only once) with a brush hog, and put a cut stub of something right through a turf tire.

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ludite13

Ok, so the broken bead/fill thing is brilliant! I imagine you could pour whatever you like in there at that point. Sand, lead shot, whatever...

So here is a dumb question, but then I was upfront with my ignorance... With regards to my front tires, the sizing on my sidewall is 4.80/4.00-8. Isn't that two sizes (4.8/4.0?) I see 4.80 and 4.00 tires for sale, but not 4.8/4.0. Am I missing something or is this some archaic sizing scale that is no longer used?

-James

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rokon2813

Tire sizes are generally height / width - rim diameter

Though at some point they changed them up a little.

4.80 is probably 4.8 inches from the bead to the ground, 4" wide on an 8" diameter rim.

Then they went to overall height instead.

A wide front tire would be a 16 x 6.50 8. 16 tall, 6.5 wide on 8" wheel

Some manufacturers dropped the height measurement on some tires. Like the 4.00 8 fronts and the 6 12 rears, instead of 23 8.50 12

Same idea as car tires though they are metric measurements and get more complicated every year. :o 205 75 15 Why the first 2 numbers are metric and the third is standard I have no idea.

Not exact science but gives a better idea of how they are measured.

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sb64
quote:Originally posted by rokon2813

Tire sizes are generally height / width - rim diameterThough at some point they changed them up a little.4.80 is probably 4.8 inches from the bead to the ground, 4" wide on an 8" diameter rim.Then they went to overall height instead.A wide front tire would be a 16 x 6.50 8. 16 tall, 6.5 wide on 8" wheelSome manufacturers dropped the height measurement on some tires. Like the 4.00 8 fronts and the 6 12 rears, instead of 23 8.50 12Same idea as car tires though they are metric measurements and get more complicated every year. :o 205 75 15 Why the first 2 numbers are metric and the third is standard I have no idea.Not exact science but gives a better idea of how they are measured.


id="quote">
id="quote">That is the most clear I've ever heard that told, thanks for explaining that.

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SmilinSam
quote:Originally posted by sb64

Ray, thanks for that cite, i will be ordering my tires through them this summer. I can order a pair of 23x8.50-12 6 Ply Deestone Super Lugs D405 (2 tires) for $97.50 and, a pair of 4.00-8 4 Ply Deestone Super Lugs D402 (2 tires) for $40.50 that's quite a deal!


id="quote">
id="quote">23x8.50x12 Deestones might be nice and cheap, but they are undersized when mounted and look horrible on the tractor. And I do mean..HoRRiBle:O!!I have two pairs of these deestones mounted on a set of DMI duals and am very unhappy with them. Deestones are all apparently undersized from the actual stated size by 1-2 inches heighth/Outside diameter wise. Knowing this I did buy some deestone 26x12x12 for my sunstar and am quite pleased with their appearance as I dont like the heighth of the carlisle 26"ers.

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ludite13

Hi Sam,

I was looking at the Deestone turf's measurements and it almost seemed to me the 10.50 tire would be the one to replace the original 8.50s. I went with the BKTs that Morrow sells for the deeper tread and 8 ply carcass. They will probably ride kinda rough, but I wanted to avoid punctures.

-James

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