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MikeES

Leaky gas tank

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MikeES

I have a B10 with a metal gas tank that weeps around the center seam. I remember posts on a product that you pour into the tank to coat the inside of the tank, a product primarily used for motorcycle tanks. Does anyone remember what the product is? And where to get it?

Thanks, Mike

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fishnwiz

There are several different makers of product. I used a product that is called Red Kote. I did not have real good results with this product but others on this site have had good luck.I am sure that others will chime in. You can also do a search and find the info you seek. Good luck.

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johnmonkey

I used a product from Eastwood and I followed the directions to a T..it worked great..as far as I know it is still holding after about 7-8 years....I gave the tractor (Bolens 1050) to a friend and he is still using it. jh

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gwiseman

Mike

I've used Kreem http://www.kreem.com/fueltankliner.html on 3 of my B-Series fuel tanks with great success. One tank now in service for nearly 10 yrs. Used to buy a bottle at local motor cycle repair shop but now they only sell a more costly prep & sealer kit. 1 bottle will seal 2 fuel tanks.

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BLT

I think Steve-WI had luck with SealAll. I tried that last year on an oil leak on the split line of oil pan and was surprised and happy of the results. I washed down affected area with a brake cleaner and when it was dry , I laid on 2 or three layers and it bonded well enough that it was a bugger to scrape off afterwards. One tube, $3.79 any hdwe store I think.

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bigten65

I highly recommend JB weld. I put on my big 10 tank many years ago with no problems. Just clean it very well with a steel bush and mix the two parts and put it on and wait for at least 24 hours and good to go.

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steve-wis

The tank I used seal-all on was a plastic one out of a J.D. sabre. It worked well there and is still holding after about two years. Not sure with metal tank, but if it were me I would either do one of the liner kits mentioned above, or else solder the seam.

Steve

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MikeES

Thanks everyone for the info. Good idea on the JB weld, should have thought of it as I have used JB weld for many things on these tractors, but I would like to seal the seam on the inside rather than JB weld the outside of the seam. I can always do the JB weld on the outside IF the inside coating doesn't work.

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cschmidt62

I had a tank in my 64 Landlord that leaked the same way, I used a wire brush on a grinder to clean it up and re-soldered it. that was a couple of years ago and it's still going.

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cschmidt62
quote:Originally posted by MikeES

Thanks for the idea Chris. I may just try the soldering. Any specific tricks or knowledge about soldering the tank that you can share.Thanks,


id="quote">
id="quote">If I remember right I used reqular pumbing solder and flux. Be sure the surface to be soldered is as clean as possible. Solder hates dirt.I used a propane torch which requires the tank to be cleaned really well to prevent a fire (Leave gas cap off). You can also use a large soldering iron. The key to a good solder joint is to heat the metal until the solder melts when you touch the tank. Use just enough heat to get the solder to flow. If done right it will suck right into the joint being soldered. If repairing pin holes I would use JB weld or one of the methods mentioned above.

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HubbardRA

If you decide to solder the tank you should remove all the gas, then fill the tank with water to the top of the filler neck to push all the gasoline out. Gasoline floats on water. I usually then use a match to ignite any remaining gas on top of the water. It is not the gasoline that will explode, it is the vapors, so every bit of fuel must be removed. I have used this technique on automobiles so I could solder holes in them.

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MikeES

Good Safety Tip Rod!

I was planning to use good soapy water and some rocks, nuts and maybe a drywall screw or two and shake up the inside really good to break anything loose first before trying the soldering. Hopefully fill the tank full with water and a little bit of detergent (which lowers the surface tension) I can determine how much of seam needs soldering.

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Allisgrandson

I used Caswell last year and I've had no problems. I was able to seal rust through holes and completely over a few tanks. The best part is that it is odorless. I don't have a heated shed so it was great doing it in the kitchen at the correct temperatures and not worrying about the wife getting mad because the whole house stinks!

This is the write-up I did last year:

http://simpletractors.com/club2/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=132741&SearchTerms=tank

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jdwilson

I've only use seal-all because it always worked the first time, besides the fact that it is fast and least evasive. Got an old 2012 that's still drip free after 20 years! My 728, probably going on 10 years.

Have an old Eagle Premier that I put on a plastic fuel return line, near the throttle body 12 years ago. Stuff just works. You'll find it at most hardware stores.

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ss74nova

I believe Brian AKA Allisgrandson in his post above put acetone & screws in the tank & strapped them to the side of his tractor wheels & drove around to loosen the rust up. Beats shaking the tanks by hand, just don't run them over. Make sure you clean out all the gas & acetone well. Clean, grind or sand the surface to be soldered well. Adding some flux wouldn't hurt. Use acid core solder & a propane torch to solder it. It works so much easier than regular silver or plumbing solder. I've soldered radiators with it & it works well. You won't find it in a plumbing store though. A radiator repair shop might have it. I've also seen it for sale at our local Agway Farm & Garden store.

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