Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Sign in to follow this  
tweinke

Cone clutch bearing

Recommended Posts

tweinke

Before I spend 70.00 for a new bearing, is there a aftermarket replacement? I seem to remember when I had it apart for BGB overhaul that it was a Fafner bearing with a common number. But it may have had a bushing inside. Any suitable replacement bearings out there? Or just better to bite the bullet and get a Simplicity bearing. I think I already know the answer but seems to be awfully expensive.?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tweinke

Ray, I agree with what you said but thought there may be a little less expensive option. Also seems I can cross the bearing number over but the inside diameter is wrong. Probably why the bushing is in there. Might see if I can find a way to make the bushing if its not too thin for future reference, but will get a new one from Simplicity. It will probably outlast me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA

The ones I have had were not bronze bushings but stainless steel bushings. The bushing is very thin. I have always went with a Simplicity part, even though it was expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HubbardRA

My bearings have all looked like they were built for a cam-lock setup originally, because of the way the inner bearing race was made. The bushings have all had a chrome/stainless look to them. I have had two go bad and the bushings were just mangled steel afterward. I did not use a magnet to see if it was stainless or just chromium steel. There was no brass in mine. These were failed bearings, not from parted out tractors. I have not taken any apart that weren't bad.

These bearings have all been from 700/7000 series tractors. The bushing may have been changed for the later model tractors. I have not taken any of those apart. I only have one 7100 series and have not taken the bearing out of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tweinke

Ok guys I installed the new bearing today and got the clutch adjusted. The bushing in the new bearing was silver colored, on the old one it was brass colored where it ran on the BGB shaft with silver color on the ends. I suspect a coating on the bushing. I also for fun searched the Fafnir number and the Peerless number on the new bearing and what comes up has a curved outer race not flat like needed, also it is one inch inside. So it would not be a quick trip to the store for a bearing then make a bushing. I don't know if anyone was interested in that but for future reference may help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GrincheyOne
quote:Originally posted by HubbardRA

My bearings have all looked like they were built for a cam-lock setup originally, because of the way the inner bearing race was made. The bushings have all had a chrome/stainless look to them. I have had two go bad and the bushings were just mangled steel afterward. I did not use a magnet to see if it was stainless or just chromium steel. There was no brass in mine. These were failed bearings, not from parted out tractors. I have not taken any apart that weren't bad. These bearings have all been from 700/7000 series tractors. The bushing may have been changed for the later model tractors. I have not taken any of those apart. I only have one 7100 series and have not taken the bearing out of it.


id="quote">
id="quote">Rod,Not all SS is attracted to a magnet. In the computer industry we used a SS hammer in a printer, That was stainless (302 if I remember) that we tested with a door magnet. Ever now and then the parts vendor would slip some other grade through. Nasty results if they got through incoming inspection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×