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bassmanben

Mowing techniques: Gear drive on a slope

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bassmanben

I have been mowing my hill acre with a 64 landlord and Broadmore 728. They are geared with belt drive. I have slopes of 15% or more that have been a challenge to mow efficiently and safely without tearing up the ground. I have found some techniques that help on the slopes.

1. 3 pt turns. I'll mows stripes across a slope. When I turn first i turn up the hill, press clutch to neutral, roll back down, then press brake to stop, then release clutch and mow another stripe.

advantage is no gear changes and keeps tractor pointing up hill on the turn. It's to steep to back up the grade.

2. For steeper slopes I'll start from the bottom keeping the tractor facing up hill. Make a run up and at then press the pedal to neutral and roll back down the hill. I make sure to use the brake to slow the tractor to a complete stop before I release the clutch for another pass. I'm sure I could flip the tractor by releasing the clutch while rolling backward.

It can get scary but the techniques help me mow quickly and does not tear up the grass. The old tractors don't seem to mind the stress and leave a fantastic cut. I hope that I am being safe.

If anybody has any experience or more tips on mowing slopes lets hear it.

Ben

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dentwizz

For the most part you have it, but I will add some learned improvements since I have had both of those models in business mowing.

1. Wheel weights. Rear wheel weights make a tremendous difference on hill stability, front wheel weights further improve it. Fronts will add to the steering response as well.

2. Depending on the area, tire chains can help in hills. I have my Hb112 with all four weights set up with tire chains at the moment to be my mountain goat mower and it works very well in places that the others can't touch. Requires a little more sensitivity to avoid scratching, but it leaves very little tracking unlike originally thought. Likely similar to ag-tread but more affordable.

3. Tire width. On my 64LL I changed the tires on the rear out with 10.5 inch wide instead of the stock 8 inch wide and the rims have a little farther spread. It adds to stability and float at the expense of less tractive pressure.

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bassmanben

Wheel weights would be nice if I had them. I do have the stinger and donuts, they give me some weight but not the stability. They actually make the front lighter. If I keep the front of the tractor pointing up the hill I don't have traction issues. If I point down reverse it slip. Also when mowing circles and up around corners will spin tires.

I certainly don't want to flip it. I don't trust my wife or kids to mow my place for that reason.

I was curios if others use the clutch to roll back and for turns. Are there safety or mechanical issues to be aware of. It only works if the belt stops and brakes are adjusted.

Ben

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dentwizz

That is the one trick my 64LL has over the HB112 hydro. The best is a half-pipe yard. One way, roll back etc. Once in a while you find 45 lb wheel weights(instead of the typical 30 or 35) and they help a lot. I would be careful with the stinger as it is more elevated wieght.

Is your rear differential hub(the RH hub) adjusted tight? It will be detailed in the manual Simplicity #990314 for the LL, the Broadmoor doesn't have the adjusting differential. If you can set it grippy tight then it will be a little harder to turn uphill but safer in braking and climbing.

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