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OrangeMetalGuy

Finally ditched the ammeter

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OrangeMetalGuy

Tractor wasn't charging again, so I replaced the ammeter with a new voltmeter from AutoZone (yes, the ammeter wires are spliced together and the voltmeter is wired to the terminal strip that becomes hot when the ignition is switched on). Under $20 and fits perfectly.It's lighted too which will help with those nighttime snowplowing events.Should have done this a long time ago, and I think I'll do my other tractor as well.

Voltmeter_opt.jpg

Voltmeter_opt.jpg.2b2dfe97603dc3b862d68c732e7ce12d.jpg

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dentwizz
quote:Originally posted by fishnwiz

Sweet mod!How come nobody here seems to have time to do these mods? I thought I was the only one with these issues.:D


id="quote">
id="quote">A couple years ago I put an hour meter on my B210. Still have to do that to the HB116, but it is stuffing engine overhauls in between revenue work and property maint(yes they both get to work for thier keep) ;)

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landlord2110

Tried the new voltmeter from autozone, dont work for landlord2110 with key turned to start the generator cranking. Would this make a difference vs the push button starter button? Any other ideas?

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dentwizz

The volt meter would have a different characteristic which is that it does not want to be fed-through like the ammeter would. The ammeter was passing voltage through to the generation/starting system whereas the volt meter should be wired parallel to the ammeter. Or at least that's my understanding of it...

The start-button system would not involve solenoid wiring and therefore be a little simpler, but the same idea applies. Wire it through with a wire joining the ammeter terminals(if deleted) and put one terminal of the volt meter to the joint and one to chassis/battery ground. That should work fine.

And it should show 12v with no engine activity.

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Mike_H

I think changing to a voltmeter from an ammeter, you could just take the two wires that were connected to the ammeter, connect them to the same post on the voltmeter, then attach a wire from the other post on the voltmeter to ground or neg batt terminal.

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Bill725

An ammeter measures current and is wired in line. A voltmeter measures power and is wired across the positive and negative. They are wired different from each other.

What good is an ammeter anyway? I never looked at mine. The most common electrical issue is a dead battery and an ammeter can't predict when that will happen. I diagnose a dead battery using a hand held voltmeter. So, I replaced my ammeter with an oil temperature gauge, a very useful gauge and look ay it often.

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Simplicity7013H

I personally like ammeters better. But, after reading this VM's are starting to grow on me. I love how the gauge lights up. I have a NOS Stewart Warner ammeter that has a hole and a little light in the back but, its only numbers are 0 and 50. Good job fitting a VM in your tractordOd

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dentwizz

If I had the choice I would have both volt and amps. The volts give the condition of the battery but the amps gives a real read of how the loads are working(like a shorted power lift or general overload). The place where it falls short is when the battery is fully charged it will read zero, the same as a generator that is dead.

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BLT
quote:Originally posted by dentwizz

If I had the choice I would have both volt and amps. The volts give the condition of the battery but the amps gives a real read of how the loads are working(like a shorted power lift or general overload). The place where it falls short is when the battery is fully charged it will read zero, the same as a generator that is dead.


id="quote">
id="quote">The voltmeter tells you the same thing. Without a load and with engine running at least 3/4 speed, make note of the voltage, then start turning load on the system. If the needle stays constant, the generator is doing its job. This is based on how the tractor was shipped and nothing has been added to the electrical system.

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