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720nut

Starter/Genorator

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PhanDad

Yes you can. Just hook the heavy cable from the solenoid (or start button on very old tractors) to the S/G. You don't hook up the field terminal.

You'll need to use a voltage regular to match the "under the flywheel" stator to charge the battery without overcharging it.

If you have a tractor with the S/G setup already (voltage regular matched to S/G) it's probably easier to let the S/G do the charging as Hick recommended.

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Hick
quote:Originally posted by Chris727

If it is a low-output stator you may not need a regulator. Check with the Briggs service manual to identify which stator your engine is equipped with.


id="quote">
id="quote">I agree. Most low-HP Briggs are low-output stators. If it needs a voltage regulator, it would already be on the engine, like the Kohlers.

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Hick
quote:Originally posted by 720nut

It had no voltage reg. was wired right to the volt gauge.


id="quote">
id="quote">Then it is a low-output. So I would forget it and hook up the starter/generator.

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BLT
quote:Originally posted by 720nut

Is it possible to use starter without using charging system? I have newer motor with charge system under flywheel


id="quote">
id="quote">Sure. It should last for quite some time as you're not using charge.

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GrincheyOne

On my 4212s, the stator is used to charge the battery, and provide ac power to the lights, The starter is isolated from the charging circuit except to share he battery. Like was stated the solenoid is wired direct to the starter. End story!:J

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Simplicity7013H

What's the point of having the S/G if your not even using it for charging? Seems easier to wire up the S/G. The stators hardly make any energy and it doesn't charge the battery as well as the S/G. JMHO

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BLT
quote:Originally posted by Simplicity7013H

What's the point of having the S/G if your not even using it for charging? Seems easier to wire up the S/G. The stators hardly make any energy and it doesn't charge the battery as well as the S/G. JMHO


id="quote">
id="quote">First of all, when those tractors were built, gear starters were not available and Delco Remy's SG's were relatively cheap. When gear starters came out, stators were available and that spelled the demise of the SG. SG's had their limitations also. They were only good for 8-10 amps nominal output because of their enclosed design and if you worked them hard the barrels could get real hot. On the older unit split circuit charging systems is all you needed, 3 amp for battery and 50-60 watts for headlights. Today with most everything having electric clutches, just about everything now has a has a DC regulated circuit. As far as output goes, it you chuck the ammeter and install a voltmeter, you'd be surprised how well a 3 amp charging system maintains the battery.

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Mike_H

Ok, since we're talking charging circuits...If you have a constant draw, like headlights, of around 5 amps and you are only charging at a 3 amp rate, wouldn't a normal starter battery have a shortened life? Starter batteries are not designed for a constant draw like a deep cycle. Or does it not really matter?

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BLT
quote:Originally posted by Mike_H

Ok, since we're talking charging circuits...If you have a constant draw, like headlights, of around 5 amps and you are only charging at a 3 amp rate, wouldn't a normal starter battery have a shortened life? Starter batteries are not designed for a constant draw like a deep cycle. Or does it not really matter?


id="quote">
id="quote"> Where you have a manual clutching PTO, a split 12DC 3A and 12VAC 55W has sufficed over the years. Mowers with electric clutches and head lights have a 12V 10 - 15 A DC regulated circuit depending on the mower builder. That's where a voltmeter is handy, it tells you the system condition.

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dentwizz

I have both systems on my HB112. Since the engine came with it installed I figured why not. They don't conflict when set up right and it makes for a bit better charging when using the electric clutch and headlights together.

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