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Mike_H

Changing Tires

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Mike_H

All,

The rear tires on my 7016 are loaded, and leaking whatever they are loaded with on my garage floor. Would like to pull them off the rim, clean and paint the rims, and fix whatever the cause of the leak is (I suspect the bead). Don't have a tire machine. What is the "best" way to unmount the tires at home? Or is it better to take them to the friendly neighborhood tire shop, and have it done?

TIA

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huffy

Frankly, the fastest, easiest, and best way to mount and un-mount tires at home, in my humble opinion, is to just pick up a tire changer from Harbor Freight. They're only like $40, and if you look on their website right now you'll see that they've got the 20% off coupon posted.

Coupon: http://www.harborfreight.com/

Tire changers: http://www.harborfreight.com/automotive-motorcycle/tire-wheel.html

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GrincheyOne
quote:Originally posted by Gary

I'd vote for going to a tire shop. Better chance of not ruining a tire.


id="quote">
id="quote">Most of the shops around here charge extra ($20) if the tires have any sealant in them. The local Western Auto charges $6 for mounting, Dismounts (if not filled)?W

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720nut

9 chances of 10 most tire guys don't want to mess with anything in tires. I have a bead breaker I use and a couple of bars, little bit of soapy water and there not so bad.

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914-allis
quote:Originally posted by huffy

Frankly, the fastest, easiest, and best way to mount and un-mount tires at home, in my humble opinion, is to just pick up a tire changer from Harbor Freight. They're only like $40, and if you look on their website right now you'll see that they've got the 20% off coupon posted. Coupon: http://www.harborfreight.com/Tire changers: http://www.harborfreight.com/automotive-motorcycle/tire-wheel.html


id="quote">
id="quote"> Buy the tire changer and it will pay for itself in no time.

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Hick

Hmmm, I read it as there is fluid in the tires (for weight), from the term "loaded". If so . . .

Calcium Chloride (a form of salt) is usually what is put in tires for weight. That is VERY nasty stuff to work with. I had a tire with that in a JD 210. Didn't KNOW it had fluid in it; when the last bolt came off and the tire fell off, I tried to grab it. It was 4' off the ground on my hoist. When I realized it was WAY heavier than normal, I let go and let it fall. It was a good 80#!!!

A car tire shop most likely will NOT deal with them, and even a shop that deals in field tractors may not; the stems they use are made for their drain & fill machines.

You can't just pull the stem and "let" the fluid out; you almost have to have a vacuum machine to pull it out. My solution was to let the pressure out then cut the valve stem off. WARNING!!! id="red">Have the valve stem at the highest point possible and pointing away from you when you let the pressure off! A face shield would be a good idea. Not only is that stuff nasty, it tastes horrible! Do this where the salt solution won't do any damage. It is a good soil sterilizer!

Once you get everything off (and the rust will make it quite difficult; you may discover some new cuss words), then you can clean & shine & paint the wheels. Be aware, the salt will be in every pore of the steel, and sandblasting may be necessary. I used a wire wheel on a grinder to shine them up the best I could, and they are starting to rust through the rattlecan paint job after a few years.

As for demounting & mounting w/o a machine. I don't have a machine and have changed tractor, car, and motorcycle tires with tire spoons. It does require a technique. Use Tire Lube, not soapy water. I used to use soapy water and had a lot of rim leaks. Once I got the regular tire lube, it goes better and tubeless seal better. The gallon I have is about 10 years old, so it goes a long ways. The larger the rim, the easier they are to use. I'd rather change the back tires of a 7060 Allis (34" rims) than a 8" wheel off a lawn mower!

Now, if I'm wrong on the Calcium Chloride, and it is "loaded" with a tire sealant of some kind, I'd rather deal with the salt!!! I HATED working on tires that were "slimed" when I was in a tire shop. MESSY to dismount, almost impossible to clean the slimey stuff off the rims, and I found some kinds rusted the rims as bad as salt! It is also very difficult to patch a slimed tire; it is almost impossible to get the rubber clean enough to get the patch to stick. Fix-a-Flat was the worst!

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Mike_H

Hick,

your point is well taken about the "stuff" inside the tires. I'm not sure what it is...though I suspect it IS calcium chloride. I'm getting rust stain on my floor.

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mbinwi

A couple of years ago, I bought the mini-tire changer from HF. It works fine. You just have to figure out a way to secure it down. I made a mounting bracket on my welding table to hold it.

After seeing the link above for the bigger version for $45, I might try one of those too.

Mike.

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Brettw

I have the HF (or similar) Tire Changer and it is great. For 30-40 bux or whatever they are, they pay for themselves quickly. It's also quite handy to have them around instead of fighting a tire or running to the tire shop. If nothing else they are great for breaking the bead! The hard part is mounting the changer solidly so it is easiest to use.

Anyway, with mine, I drilled three holes in the concrete floor and added anchors, with bolts that are removeable (the anchors stay in the floor). When not in use, I pull the bolts and install these rounded top bolts with never seize (winter salt around here might make them a permanent fixture without the never seize). They come right out of the floor when needed, and I bolt the tire changer down so I can really crank on it. The rounded bolts are nearly flush with the floor and not even noticed the rest of the time. Works good for me.

I am not sure if they make a different model, but the one down side is the axel opening on the front wheels is too small for the model I have. You can't work on the small wheels. Something to lkeep in mind and check into. I bought mine used so I don't know all of the details of them.

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wwbragg

The Harbor Freight tire changer cost $45. With a 20% coupon that comes to $36. The tire shop will charge you $12 to $15 per tire. You will pay for the tool with your first use. I have one and have paid for it many times over. I love it.

Wendell

Given a fool proof system, nature will provide a dumber fool.

PS: I just received a Mother's Day (only) 25% off coupon from HF - - what a deal. The MRS would love a new tire changer. Mount the changer to the floor as described by Brettw above. Instructions for floor mount are also included with the item or you can mount it on a pallet.

As for the rust described above, have the wheels media blasted and powder coated. Costs about $25 per wheel. You could also treat them with POR 15.

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Kenzen

I mounted my HF tire changer to the end of a length of 2x10, and when I use it I drive my truck on top of the other end of the 2x10 to pin it to the ground. Works great, just watch working around the truck with the tire mounting tools (unless your truck is a real beater like mine).

Ken

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