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Kent

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Dutch
Since all you proponents praised the virtues of the AC B-series, I’ll brag on my favorite, the Simplicity 7000 series. The 7000 has a 48” WB (same as a B-110), yet is 7” shorter overall (even 5” shorter than the B-210). The 7000 has a comfortable turning radius of 30.5”. On the 7000, both the hood and seat deck flip up for easy service (no annoying, rattling, troublesome bolts to remove….. if they haven’t been long lost). The 7000 has a plastic fuel tank (no rust problem here) that is easy to remove for instrument panel service. The 7000 series offers both Kohler and Briggs engines in 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, & 18 hp. Plus a choice of 3 speed, 6 speed, shuttle, and hydrostatic transmissions (BTW - Sunstrand). With the extensive drive train options, the operator does not have to use their feet to push the tractor like some kind of kid’s scooter. Therefore, full length safe and comfortable footrests can be used (the footrests can be removed if you want to do the scooter routine). Best of all, the Simplicity 7000 is finished in a distinctive, colorful, and attractive 3 tone paint scheme, not the boring single color like the AC B-series (what do you guys call that anyway….. mustard? Ugh!). I could mention many other 7000 features (like the cone clutch center PTO, or the built in headlamps, not some add-on that looks like a 1920's auto), but I don’t want you guys to get so jealous you burn or scrap those B series.
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Dutch
James, I’ve never used an AC B-series or Simplicity counterpart, so I’m glad to hear from someone with experience. I was just beating on the B-series to get a reaction, and it worked. I do have a ’96 Sovereign (do those things have a model # designation?), but I prefer to use my 7010-6 or 7012H. The Sovereign is slightly longer, has wider tires, and a high back seat, but it feels much larger and more cumbersome. I do like the smoothness and higher power of the Kohler Command, but that’s about it. I’ll take the 7000 series. Kent, We who live in South Jersey are neither "Hillbillys" nor "Flatlanders". We are known as "Pineys".

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Kent
Dutch, IMO, the pinewoods of New Jersey is one of the "best-kept secrets" of the Eastern US... and one of the few places I'd want to live along the East coast (not that it's all that close to the coast)... I just hope people understand that we're just teasing each other in good fun.... Kent

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StinKy
I have an Allis 314 but cant make any comments on it's operating pros or cons cause it isnt running yet. I like the electric clutch for implement control. My big Sears has the exact type as is on the Allis and I've had it completely apart for new bearings. They are not that complicated to repair. I do not care for the electric lift however and intend to make up a hydraulic system for it. The decks on the 300-400 Allis are shallow and I dont think they mow as good as the deep Simplicity type. JMO. Dick

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Kent
Herb. I like the 700/7000 tractors too -- they make great donor tractors when you need a tranny or engine or something to keep the B-series going... I'm confused (again) about the specs you mentioned for these tractors, though. As I understand it, the B-110 has a 44" wheelbase, the B-210 has a 48" wheelbase, and the 7000 (AC 700) series has a 48.1" wheelbase. I looked these up when I was trying to figure out what I'd need to do about a belt for my "hybrid" HB-210... I can understand that the B-series might be longer because of the front PTO shaft sticking out (BTW, a totally accessible, troublefree front PTO, I might add), but I can't see that a 7000 series has a shorter wheelbase. Don't know how the turning radiuses compare.... While we're "stirring the pot" I guess it is a good thing that the hoods flip open to expose those Kohler engines -- some think they require a lot more maintenance than the "old reliable" cast-iron Briggs... Plus, I guess some of us are just fortunate enough to have hills and snow to play in -- which inevitably leads to some spinning -- whether you choose to put your feet down or not.... ;^) Kent

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Dutch
Kent, You know you’re not confused, you’re right. The B-210 does have the 48” WB while it’s the B-110 with the 44”. Thank you for correcting my transposition error. As for the 7000 specs, I intentionally rounded the 48.1” to 48”, but I really wasn’t trying to mislead anyone... honest. The B-series front PTO should be troublefree. Except for possible severe engine damage when that exposed, unprotected protrusion hits a tree or wall when the operator’s feet can’t reach the ground to control the tractor, what can go wrong with a primitive sheave on a shaft? I suppose operators who like to use their feet to control machinery also like 3 belt snowthrowers, and jumping off a tractor to run around front to disengage a powered implement (sounds exciting). I’m not into “roughing it”. I prefer the 7000 series clutches that can be conveniently operated from the safety of the driver’s seat. If those “some” you mention are right, it’s too bad Allis-Chalmers didn’t know that Kohlers couldn’t compare with the “old reliable cast-iron Briggs” before AC switched to Kohlers exclusively. Do you think that decision was the cause for AC’s demise? Perhaps if AC had followed Simplicity’s lead to offer a wide variety of engines, maybe AC would still be in business? Due to my background, the AC B-series tractors remind me of B-model Mack trucks. Mack stopped making those in 1965. They were something else. The driver sat on a hard seat, and reached around and through the steering wheel with both arms to shift the twin stick Tri-Plex transmission (ah, the good old days). I heard that some guy here in New Jersey disassembled a perfectly good late model R-model Mack to use the components in his old B-model. Reportedly, he was committed to some “rest home” in Massachusetts and now spends his days having “truck races” by rolling rocks down snow covered hills, while we spend our days enjoying balmy weather.

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Roy
Dutch, I realize this is all in "good fun" but I gotta take issue with your preferene for the cone clutch over the shaft drive for accessories. My B-1 drops the mower right in very quietly and smoothly when I engage the idler pulley/clutch to drive the deck. My new Sovereign squalls like its coming apart every time the deck is engages regardless of engine rpm. Plus, the jackshaft drive uses a shorter belt to drive the deck with fewer turns and twists. My 2 cents. Roy

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MPH
Guess my AC book must be wrong, page a-6 says a B110 has a 44" wheel base, page a-7 says a B-112 is 48" and page A-12 states a the B210 and B212 are 43 inch. If I was new to this site I'd think its a good thing you two don't live in the same town:}...MPH

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fomoco390
Wow, this AC slander borders on animosity! I tend to agree, for the most part. I have 2 AC 716H's, which are incredible and very capable. I also have 2 Landlord 101's, which are also incredible and very capable. I love using all of them for different chores. Obviously the bigger tractors can handle the plowing and tilling better. I don't know, but there's something about being on the older iron that's more appealing from a hobby or collector standpoint. Yes, the later tractors were updated versions of the former, but that only goes so far. I wouldn't trade my 716 for a new 918H, even the special 75th anniversary model. One more point: have you ever tried finding a sickle-bar mower (or rarer item) for the later tractors? The implement selection is better for the old guys, I think.

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Kent
Dutch, The 3-belt snowblower went away in 1963 with the last of the 725s and B-1s.... (they're a whole, separate category on this new Simplicity poll, by the way). They went to a single belt, mechanical clutch system that is not all that different from the pulley system used on the 7000 series. Instead of an expensive, troublesome electric front PTO, there was the reliable idler pulley going over-center, and it was engaged by a rod you pushed or pulled from the seat... Yep, the 8-position heated, power seats with memory features in the new luxury automobiles are sure nice and comfortable, as the electric windows with built-in safety features to prevent you from pinching arms or fingers, and all windows can be controlled, overridden or "locked out" from the driver's seat -- they're are all certainly handy... but I've got to wonder how well they'll all function when they're 35 or 40 years old... or how expensive they'll be to repair -- if you can find or fabricate parts. I feel the same way about electric PTOs, electric lifts, electric "don't let me do something dumb" switches, etc. on the newer tractors.... Sounds like you like "fancy cars and tractors" but "simple trucks".... To each their own, I guess. And as far as damaging that front, exposed crankshaft, I can always use my front counterweight as a "bumper" which helps me lift any center or rear implement with my hydraulic lift system (that happens to apply real down-pressure)... I wonder how long it will be before we won't be able to work on our new tractors because they're too complicated, or require very expensive test equipment to read the fault codes... I won't get into the "hillbilly" versus "flatlander" issues -- or the north (snow & ice) versus south issues -- those have caused too many real shots being fired in the past! Smile......... MPH, That's an error in the AC documents, as far as I can tell. They lengthened the rear of the tractor from the bevel gear box back by 4" when they went to variable speed and hydrostatic trannies... the B-110 (and 2110, I think ??) are the last of the short wheelbase tractors. Kent

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Dutch
Roy, None of my 3 tractors (all cone clutches - 2 7000 style idlers & 1 7100 style idler) make the noise you describe. I do get a quick "chirp" upon engagement, but they don't sound like they're "coming apart". Are you talking about your fairly new Sovereign? Is the noise in the clutch or belt? Did you check the BGB backlash, clutch bearings, spring seats, and shaft nut tightness? Is the idler adjusted to be in the "green"?

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Roy
Dutch, Yup, its my 2000 Sovereign. The idler is in the "green". The noise could be in the clutch which I have never looked into but it sounds like a "belt squall" upon engagement. Seems like the clutch may be due for a look see. Thanks for the tip. Roy

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