Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

  • Announcements

    • Kent

      Sign In or Password Problems?   10/09/2016

      If you can't Sign In, you need to reset your password.  Use the Forgot Your Password link at the bottom of the Sign In screen, and the site will send you an email to reset it. If you have an AOL email account, use the Contact Us link at the bottom of the screen -- AOL is intermittently blocking email from the site.
    • Kent

      Feedback Please!   10/28/2017

      See News and Announcements forum.
carterd

Aluminum Driveshaft?

Recommended Posts

carterd

I am a machinist by day, and I have access to scrap material to try and make an aluminum driveshaft for my 916H. Is there anything I am not seeing that would make this a bad idea? My current driveshaft is a  cobble job due to the Frankenstein tractor of mine (916H/917H/716H mixed into one tractor). 

 

When I make it, I would be stretching it an additional 3" to remove my spacer I have been using so I can use just the two flex disks.

 

Dallas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PhanDad

I'm not a fan of long spacers so I think a full length driveshaft is a good idea. 

Don't know about an aluminum one though.  Need a "metals guy" to answer your question.  Overall and fatigue strength might be an issue. 

  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleOrange

Electrolysis, aluminium is a sacrificial metal  your driveshaft becomes an anode.

https://www.corrosionpedia.com/definition/5301/aluminum-anode

  •  

Aluminum Anode

 

Definition - What does Aluminum Anode mean?

An aluminum anode is a type of sacrificial anode. It is called a sacrificial anode because it sacrifices itself by becoming corroded instead of a more important metal item or piece of equipment. Sacrificial anodes are made from materials that corrode easily and are deliberately installed in pipes and tanks, leaving the rest of the system relatively corrosion-free. A sacrificial anode is also called a galvanic anode.

Aluminum anodes are also known as aluminum sacrificial anodes.

 
 

Corrosionpedia explains Aluminum Anode

Aluminum anodes are commonly used sacrificial anodes that keep many types of industrial equipment corrosion-free. They are used in:

  • Ship hulls
  • Water heaters
  • Pipelines
  • Distribution systems
  • Above-ground tanks
  • Underground tanks
  • Refineries

The other most common sacrificial anodes are magnesium and zinc anodes.

Benefits of using aluminum anodes are:

  • They are better than zinc or magnesium anodes because they are more active.
  • Unlike magnesium anodes, they are not dangerous in salt or brackish water.
  • They last longer and are the only type of sacrificial anode type that can be used in any water (e.g., fresh water, brackish or saline).
  • They are 2.5 times thicker than zinc or magnesium anodes, thus they protect the equipment for a longer time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill725

I made my own driveshaft by cutting the flanges off of an existing driveshaft on a lathe and  welding then onto a piece of bar stock and then faced the end flanges to true up in a lathe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carterd

Thank you all!! I feel much better about trying an aluminum driveshaft. All we have in our shop for aluminum is 6061 grade aluminum. And while I'm at it, I'll be making a steel one. 

 

Is anyone interested in this to the point where I should take pictures and post them? I can also post drawings of the flanges and shaft as I am drawing them up in Solidworks while I do this. 

 

Dallas

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
deebig

It can't become a sacrificial anode because the flex disks will electrically isolate it from rest of tractor! Even if not isolated you would need tractor immersed in water to complete the sacrificial effect.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kwt

I don't know what the strength of the aluminum that you plan to use, but I would be willing to bet that it's weaker than steel. If I were you I would be looking to increase the diameter of the shaft to handle the torque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carterd

for this experiment,  I will try .75" shafts for both aluminum and steel,  but will be making new mounting flanges that have a 1" opening for a shaft. Once I have material in the CNC, its a quick program to run so I can try a few variations of it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dhoadley
15 hours ago, carterd said:

Is anyone interested in this to the point where I should take pictures and post them? I can also post drawings of the flanges and shaft as I am drawing them up in Solidworks while I do this. 

 

Dallas

YES! dOd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleOrange
16 hours ago, deebig said:

It can't become a sacrificial anode because the flex disks will electrically isolate it from rest of tractor! Even if not isolated you would need tractor immersed in water to complete the sacrificial effect.

On my Allis 720 there's only one flex disk used on the drive shaft, and that coupling is affixed to the engine flywheel.

The snow thrower uses a pair of flex disks so yea that shaft would be isolated.

I'm far from being an authority on galvanic corrosion, but through another hobby in my research of the electromotive series of metals did manage to learn a little about battery's and the corrosion of metals.

Corrosion testing and the prevention of it, is a  very big business.

Non-destructive corrosion rate monitoring for reinforced concrete structures

Dubravka Bjegovic, Dunja Mikulic, Dalibor Sekulic
Contact

ABSTRACT

The corrosion of reinforcements has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature failures. Monitoring the corrosion rate, assuming the uniform corrosion and the loss in diameter decreases linear with the corrosion rate, allows calculating the remaining load carrying and the safety of the structure. There are several methods of measuring true, instantaneous rate of corrosion, based on electrochemical methods.
This paper describes electropotential mapping method and measuring techniques with the Gecor 6 device, their application, advantages and disadvantages based on our own experiences, and the interpretation of the measurement results.

1. INTRODUCTION

A serious problem of concrete infrastructure deterioration, as a result of reinforced steel corrosion, goes along with great economical consequences. New-built concrete is alkali and reinforcement corrosion is obstructed. Decrease of pore water pH value causes depasivation of metal surface and initiation of corrosion. Penetration of chloride ions from environment in concrete and reaction with atmospheric carbon dioxide are the main source of corrosion. Corrosion products have bigger volume than steel, which causes tensile strains in concrete. If the tensile strains are bigger than tensile strength of concrete, the result is cracking of concrete. Penetration of chlorides and diffusion of carbon dioxide are increased at the places of cracks, which further increases corrosion. Another consequence of crack formation is the development of galvanic cells with anodic and cathodic areas with corrosion at unprotected (anodic) areas. Pitting corrosion and galvanic macrocell formation generate small losses of steel, but create areas with concentrations of strains.
The main investigation of corrosion researchers is detection and measuring of defects in the initial stage of corrosion process. This paper presents actual methods for corrosion characterisation in reinforced concrete (Table 1).

 

ELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS NONELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS
STATIC MEASUREMENTS
Half-cell potential measurements
   Hand held equipment
   Embedded reference electrodes
Corrosion macrocell current
measuring Electrochemical noise
Visual inspection
Seismic method
Infrared thermography
Acoustic emission
Radiography and radiometry Radar
Electrical resistivity of concrete
Electrical resistance method
Optical fibber sensors Magnetic technique
Microwave based Thermoreflectometry
POLARISATION MEASUREMENTS
Linear polarisation method
   Hand held equipment
   Embedded linear polarisation sensors

Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
   Localised electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Galvanostatic pulse method
Scanning reference electrode method
Table 1: Actual methods for corrosion characterisation in reinforced concrete

2. ELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS

2.1 STATIC MEASUREMENTS

2.1.1 HALF-CELL POTENTIAL MEASUREMENTS

fig1.gif Fig 1: Principle of the half-cell method
  • The principle involved in this method is appearance of an electrical potential between the reinforcing steel and a reference electrode named half-cell. The half-cell consists of a metal rod immersed in a solution of its own ions (Fig. 1).

     

    The role of the half-cell is to insure constant reference potential. The metal rod is connected with reinforcement steel by a voltmeter, and the ion solution is connected to the pore water via moist porous plug [1]. Measuring method is based on many measurements of potential and correlation of measured potentials with observed corrosion rate at reinforcement. Table 2 presents criteria according to ASTM C-876 standard for cooper-cooper sulphate electrode, and also for calomel and silver-silver chloride. The main application of this method is in situ.

     

    Cu/CuSO4 Calomel (SCE) Ag/AgCl Interpretation
    E>-200mV E>-126mV E>-119mV Greater than 90% probability that no corrosion is occurring
    -200mV < E < -350mV -126mV < E < -276mV -119mV < E < -269mV Corrosion activity is uncertain
    E<-350mV E<-276mV E<-269mV Greater than 90% probability that no corrosion is occurring
    Table 2: Interpretation of corrosion potential measurements

    Hand held equipment
    The half-cell is moved across the concrete surface to be investigated, and the electrode potentials are measured at many points. The measured potential is drawn as equipotential lines to identify the corrosion areas [2]. Extra devices are constructed to accelerate measuring [3].

    Embedded reference electrodes
    Results obtained by means of the hand held equipment are not accurate, because there is a concrete layer between half-cell and steel with variations in resistance and thickness. To avoid negative effects of the concrete layer, half-cells can be embedded in concrete close to the reinforcing steel. Different reference electrodes are commercially available. Pseudoreference mixed metal oxide electrodes (Fig.2) consists of mixed metal oxide activated titanium rod, cast in specially developed cementuos body, which has long term stability of the electrochemical potential [4]. The ERE 20-Embeddable reference electrode, developed and manufactured by the FORCE Institute using a manganese dioxide electrode in a steel housing with an alkaline, chloride free gel (Fig.3) [5]. The relevant sensor is manufactured by the Austrian Ingenierbüro Wietek (Fig.4) [6]. The PVC covered sensor in the form of a wire is wrapped around the steel to be monitored. A potential between the steel and electrode can be measured by using the half-cell. The advantage of the method is great sensitivity, which makes the method suitable for measurements of pitting corrosion at the large concrete structures.

     

    fig2.jpg Fig 2: MMO Ti probe fig3.jpg Fig 3: ERE 20 probe fig4.jpg Fig 4: Wire sensor

     

    2.1.2 CORROSION MACROCELL CURRENT MEASURING
    During the corrosion process, corrosion macrocells are formed with a distribution of anodic and cathodic areas. Voltage in a macrocell element equal to potential difference between active and passive steel gives the corrosion current:

     

    I=DU/(RE+RA+RC) (1)

    Where,I - electrical current (mA)

    • D U -voltage in the macrocell element (mV)
      RE - concrete electrical resistance (W)
      RA - anode reaction electrical resistance (W)
      RC - cathode reaction electrical resistance (W)

    Mass of the steel loss can be directly calculated from the Faraday law:

     

    e2.gif (2)

    Where, Wm - molecular mass (g/mol)

    • t -time (s)
      V -valence
      F -Faraday constant (96500 C)

    Different measuring configurations for in-situ testing are developed. Figure 5 shows a measuring system developed by Schiessel and Rupach [7, 8]. The system consists of the steel electrodes and insulting supports. The sensor can be built in a new construction or during the repair. Steel electrodes are placed at different depths which makes depasivation front monitoring possible. Another configuration is a Corrowatch Multiprobe manufactured by Germann Instruments (Fig.6) [5]. A multi-probe test unit (Fig.7) developed by the Swedish FORCE Institute consists of 20 embedded steel electrodes, which are potentiostatically held at a fixed potential. The test unit is exposed to chloride ions diffusing from one side. Initiation of corrosion can be detected by a sudden rise in the anodic current [7]. These test methods have an advantage in providing direct indication of electrochemical activity in the system.

     

    fig5.jpg Fig 5: Schiessel probe fig6.jpg Fig 6: Corrowatch probe fig7.jpg Fig 7: FORCE probe

     

    2.1.3 ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE
    Fluctuations of potential and current, generated spontaneously by the corrosion process, make electrochemical noise. Analysis of fluctuations after spectral decomposition gives not only finding of corrosion, but characterisation of the corrosion process. Advantage of the electrochemical noise method is absence of external current or voltages supply which perturbate system. Measured signals can be analysed by mathematical analysis. In the case of complicated kinds of corrosion, like metastabile pitting corrosion or corrosion inhibitor induced by unstable passivation, mathematical analysis becomes unsuccessful, and some researchers suggest application of chaos theory at corrosion electrochemistry [9].

    2.2 POLARISATION MEASUREMENTS

    2.2.1 LINEAR POLARISATION METHOD
    In the linear polarisation method, a potential scan is applied at the specimen in a range Ecorr±25mV. The resulting current has linear dependence versus the potential, which can be evaluated from the equation:

     

    e3.gif (3)

    Rate between the applied current and the potential response DE gives polarisation resistance Rp:

     

    e4.gif (4)

    Where,

    • Di - applied current (mA)
      DE -potential response (mV)
      icorr -corrosion intensity (mA/cm2)
      Rp - polarisation resistance (kW)
      B - value of 13 to 52 mV in the most metal / media systems
      ba - anodic Taffel constant
      bc-cathodic Taffel constant

    This is Stern-Geary relation, which can be used for corrosion current calculation. The linear polarisation technique has been used widely in laboratory work for corrosion rate determination, but some modifications are needed for its application to structures in the field [10].

    Hand held equipment
    A difficulty with the linear polarisation technique is requirement for determination of area of steel being polarised without which accurate corrosion determination can't be achieved. This problem is avoided by use of an extra ring electrode placed around the central electrode. In this way, signal application is limited at the known rebar area. Based on this principle, in situ devices are developed. "Gecor 6" (Fig.8) consists of the rate meter that automatically controls the system and two sensors. Sensor A is for the corrosion rate and half-cell measurements and sensor B is for the concrete resistivity, temperature and relative humidity measurements [11]. Another device is MS 4500 Polarisation Resistance Monitor for accurate determination of polarisation resistance even in high resistance concrete environments (Fig.9) [12].

     

    fig8.jpg Fig 8: Gecor 6 fig9.jpg Fig 9: MS 4500 polarization device

     

    Embeddable linear polarisation sensors
    Based on the linear polarisation principle, embeddable minisensors are developed. Different types of minisensors are commercially available. The C-probe CP100 (Fig.10) is a combination of Silver/silver chloride reference half cell and graphite counter electrode [7]. CORROATER 800/800T (Fig.11) is manufactured using carbon steel measures corrosion rate of reinforcing steel in concrete [12]. General Building Research Corporation of Japan developed sensor, as shown in the Figure 12. Three electrochemical characteristics of natural potential, polarization resistance and electrolyte resistance can be measured [13]. All this probes have possibility of automated measurements using computer-controlled equipment.

     

    fig10.gif Fig 10: C-probe type CP 100 fig11.jpg Fig 11: CORROATER fig12.jpg Fig 12: Minisensor

     

    2.2.2 ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY (EIS)
    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) uses polarisation with alternating current. Instrumentation for measurements is more sophisticated than for other polarisation measurements, consisting of a potentiostat and spectrum analyser. Reinforcement is maintained at its corrosion potential Ecorr by the potentiostat, with application of a sinusoidal potential (10 to 20 mV) in a wide frequency range. The response at input signal is also sinusoidal with phase shift relative to the input signal. The EIS method in its basic formulation is very attractive because it can determine polarisation resistance and add extra information about the corrosion process. High frequency range can give information about dielectric properties of concrete, and low frequency range information about dielectric properties of passivity film on the steel. In spite of these possibilities, the method hasn't had wide application to reinforced concrete, because diagrams become complex and difficult for interpretation [14].

    Localised electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (LEIS)
    Data obtained by the conventional EIS technique are averaged across the entire area of the sample, and this technique isn't suitable for application for chloride induced pitting corrosion. To avoid problems, localised electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (LEIS) is developed 15 . The principles of LEIS are similar to those in conventional EIS, but LEIS combines both established direct current scanning probe methods with alternating current impedance techniques. The probe consists of two separate platinised electrodes. The first electrode has a tip, which is electrochemically sharpened to 5 mm in diameter. The second ring electrode is positioned at a fixed distance of 2-3 mm away from the tip electrode. Method is suitable for the corrosion inhibitor effectiveness investigation.

    2.2.3 GALVANOSTATIC PULSE METHOD
    A short time anodic pulse (typically 8 s) is applied galvanostaticially on the reinforcement and the resulted change in potential is monitored. Potentials are measured with a reference electrode and the high impedance voltmeter. When a current impulse Iapp is applied to a corrosion system, the potential V as a function of time can be expressed as [16]:

     

    e5.gif (5)

    Where, Rp -polarisation resistance (W)

    • Cdl -capacity of double layer (mF)
      RW -ohmic resistance (W)
    fig13.gif Fig 13: The GalvaPulse device

    The Galvanostatic pulse method allows rapid measurements of polarisation resistance, ohmic resistance and open circuit potential. An example of an instrument used in this method is GalvaPulse by the Gemann Instruments (Fig 13.) This is a rapid non-destructive device for determining the corrosion rate of reinforcement in concrete. The device is equipped with software, which enables displaying the corrosion rate, electrical resistance and half-cell potential, together with the graphs of the galvanostatic pulse [5].

    2.2.4 SCANNING REFERENCE ELECTRODE METHOD (SRET)
    In localised corrosion, anodic and cathodic reactions usually occur at separate sites. These reactions produce small but measurable ionic transport in the electrolyte local to the anodic and cathodic sites. The Scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) measures micro galvanic potentials existing locally on the surface of the specimen using uniquely designed scanning electrode. Specimens rotate in a solution by means of a stepper electromotor. Measurement is made by means of the scanning electrode and differential amplifier, which gives two-dimensional picture of any region of interest. Method allows dynamical information of corrosion activity, which has been done by the variations of ionic flow at the microscopic scale. The SRET method can be used for pasivation research of corrosion at grain boundaries, and cracking under corrosion induced strain [17].

3 NONELECTHROCHEMICAL METHODS

Many nonelectrochemical methods, are suitable for determining corrosion of reinforced steel in concrete 18, 19, 20, and 21 . The list of the nonelectrochemical methods is given in Table 1. These methods will be described in the next paper.

4 CONCLUSION

An overview of most frequent nondestructive corrosion determination methods as applied for the reinforced concrete is presented. Nondestructive methods are advantageous when compared to destructive methods. Continuos monitoring of reinforcement condition is enabled, measurements can be done at the level of the entire structure, and nondestructive methods have proven to be fast and inexpensive. On the other hand, determination of reinforcement steel with nondestructive methods is complex and may lead to wrong interpretation of results. To avoid misinterpretation it is recommended to combine several nondestructive testing methods, before making any conclusion about reinforcement steel corrosion.

REFERENCES

  1. Devalapura, R.K.; Kamel, M.R.; Arumugasaamy, P., Nondestructive Techniques for Corrosion Evaluation of Steel in Concrete, Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Steel in Concrete, Proceedings of International Conference held at the University of Sheffield, Vol.1, July 1994, pp.300-309.
  2. 2Moller,P.H., Potential Mapping - an Important Method of Measuring R.C. Structures, Construction Maintenance & Repair, June 1992, pp. 21-23.
  3. Broomfield, J.P., Langford P.E., Ewins, A.J., The Use of Potential Wheel to Survey Reinforced Concrete Structures, Corrosion Rates of Steel in Concrete, ASTM STP 1065, N.S. Berke, V., Chaker, D. Whiting, EDS, American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia,1990, pp.157-173.
  4. http://www.cescor.it
  5. http://www.germann.org
  6. http://www.a-bau.co.at
  7. Bjegovic D., Miksic, B., Stehly R.,Test Protocols for Migrating Corrosion Inhibitors (MCI) in Reinforced Concrete, Emerging Trends in Corrosion Control - Evaluation, Monitoring, Solutions, Vol. 1, Akademia Books International and NACE International, India Section, New Delhi, India, 1999, pp. 3-18.
  8. Schiessl, P., Raupach, M., Monitoring System for the Corrosion Risk of Steel in Concrete Structures, Concrete International, 1992, No.7, pp. 52-55.
  9. Katwan M.J., Hodgkiess T.; Arthur P.D., Electrochemical Noise Technique for the Prediction of Corrosion Rate of Steel in Concrete Materials and Structures, Vol.29, June 1996, pp. 286-294.
  10. Bjegovic, D., Elektrokemijski aspekti korozije armiranog betona, Gradevinar, Vol.51, No.7, 1994, pp.405-415.
  11. Broomfield, J.P., Rodriguez, J., Ortega, L.M., Garcia, A.M., Corrosion Rate and Life Prediction for Reinforced Concrete Structures, GEOCISA Spain, Structural Faults and Repairs Symposium, June 1993.
  12. http://corrpro.com
  13. Nagayama, M., MCI 2020 Long Term Test Protection of Rebar in Cincrete, Final Report, General Building Research Corporation of Japan, October 1999.
  14. Lemoine, L., Wenger F., Galland J., Study of the Corrosion of Concrete Reinforcement by Electrochemical Impedance Measurement, Corrosion Rates of Steel in Concrete, ASTM STP 1065, N.S. Berke, V. Chaker, and D. Whiting, Eds., American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, 1990, pp. 118-133.
  15. Morlidge, J.R., Electrochemical Techniques for the Detection of Concrete Corrosion Inhibitors under Simulated Pore Solution Conditions, Aston University One Day Conference, Wednesday 26 January 2000.
  16. Elsener, B., Wojtas H., Bohni H., Galvnostatic Pulse Measurements - Rapid on Site Corrosion Monitoring, Proceedings of International Conference held at the University of Sheffield, Vol.1, 24 - 28 July 1994, pp. 236-246.
  17. Akid R., Application of the Scanning Reference Electrode Technique to the Study of Steel Corrossion in a Cement-based Coating, Conference held at the University of Sheffield, Vol.1, 24 - 28 July 1994, pp. 278 - 289.
  18. Broomfield, J.P., Assessing Corrosion Damage on Reinforced Concrete Structures, Proceedings of International Conference held at the University of Sheffield, Vol.1, 24-28 July, 1994, pp. 1-25.
  19. Chase, S.B., Livingston, R., Washer, G., Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of Highway Bridges,http://www.tfhrc.gov/structur/struc98/ch5.htm, 1998.
  20. Ghorbanpoor, A., Shi, S., Assessment of Corrosion of Steel in Concrete Structures by Magnetic based NDE Techniques, Techniques to Asses the Corrosion Activity of Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures, ASTM STP 1276, Neal S. Berke, Edward Escalante, Charles K. Nmai, and David Whiting, EDS. American Society for Testing and Materials, 1996.
  21. Gucinski N., Maher, A., Use of Nondestructive Seismic Techniques for Optimum Maintenance and Management of Roads and Bridges, Proceedings, Second Croatian Road Congress, 24-27 October 1999, Vol. 1, pp. 211-218.

 

© AIPnD , created by NDT.net |Home|    |Top|

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleOrange
3 hours ago, deebig said:

Aluminum bolted tightly against steel/cast iron does not present a corrosion problem unless constantly immersed in water. 

If you rose early enough in the morning you would discover your lawn covered in dew aka H2o, we're surrounded by water.

 

Edited by SimpleOrange

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
deebig
9 hours ago, SimpleOrange said:

If you rose early enough in the morning you would discover your lawn covered in dew aka H2o, we're surrounded by water.

 

True.....but you would not find dew under your tractor or anything that is covered! That is why we have carports in the south. Think of aluminum cylinder heads on a iron block and the many other aluminum components bolted to an engine block.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleOrange
51 minutes ago, deebig said:

True.....but you would not find dew under your tractor or anything that is covered! That is why we have carports in the south. Think of aluminum cylinder heads on a iron block and the many other aluminum components bolted to an engine block.

True, cylinder head and engine block castings are made from one of the many aluminium alloys available for the purpose.

One of my hobby's is home foundry, my preferred feed-stock is that from cylinder heads and engine blocks, most unfavourable that I refuse to use fall under, beer and beverage cans, window and door frames along with discarded BBQ's.

However to end this madness and keep the peace on the forum, I will deffer to your superior knowledge..

In any event his aluminium driveshaft will work as intended, I was merely giving caution on the use of an improper alloy.

My other hobby is refining precious metals, gold, silver along with a few from the platinum group. It is from this hobby that sparked my interest into researching galvanic corrosion along with the electromotive series of metals.

My only regret is that I did not begin my study until after I had retired and feel that I wasted my youth.

Don't be fooled by the nic.

quit.png

Edited by SimpleOrange

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dhoadley

SimpleOrange, its all good. I see nothing but peace on the forum. The above detailed expose (sp?) on aluminum was a bit dense for me to try and understand over my first coffee of the early morning, but I appreciate that you posted it. The collective knowledge is one of this site's greatest strengths. Dave

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
deebig

Simple orange I appreciate data and scientific facts and you are spot on with that. That info is interesting but I was just making a point to the OP that he should not let that info deter him from experimenting with making his driveshaft. As a side note mix aluminum and copper,add a little moisture or electrical current and.........!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
B10Dave

Too complicated for my intellect. Plus I only have a welder that works on steel; hence any driveshaft modifications done by me will be in ferrous metal. P.S. Thanks for all that other info anyways.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carterd

I appreciate all feedback if it’s done in the right spirit and backed by sound reasoning.  

I started with a steel driveshaft that is 3” longer then the one I had been using. I need to put more thought into my aluminum one for now lol. 

F539DF53-6A89-4B93-AA0E-3CEB22A813BD.jpeg

FAA7ED57-63A4-4DA8-812A-471C40C480A8.jpeg

BB312FB7-9298-4A78-A7BE-2AB847823F27.jpeg

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleOrange
40 minutes ago, carterd said:

I appreciate all feedback if it’s done in the right spirit and backed by sound reasoning.  

I started with a steel driveshaft that is 3” longer then the one I had been using. I need to put more thought into my aluminum one for now lol. 

F539DF53-6A89-4B93-AA0E-3CEB22A813BD.jpeg

FAA7ED57-63A4-4DA8-812A-471C40C480A8.jpeg

BB312FB7-9298-4A78-A7BE-2AB847823F27.jpeg

Awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleOrange
On 11/06/2018 at 1:07 PM, carterd said:

Thank you all!! I feel much better about trying an aluminum driveshaft. All we have in our shop for aluminum is 6061 grade aluminum. And while I'm at it, I'll be making a steel one. 

 

Is anyone interested in this to the point where I should take pictures and post them? I can also post drawings of the flanges and shaft as I am drawing them up in Solidworks while I do this. 

 

Dallas

Dallas your 6061 is a good choice.

Alloy 6061 has excellent corrosion resistance to atmospheric conditions and good corrosion resistance to sea water. This alloy also offers good finishing ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
carterd

Thank you Ken. I have that book marked on my browser! 

I am doing some engine swapping so I’ve got a goofy combination which lead to me needing to run a bunch of spacers to fill a gap and I’ve got a significant wobble  

Maybe my BGB box just needs to be rebuilt. I know it has some play in it, but when I read about others on here with problems, they have a lot more movement then I do. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×