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carterd

917H dually build with pics

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carterd

I ended up with three sets of tires and wheels in my sudden obsession with allis chalmers garden tractors. 

 

What do you do with that many rear tires? Duallies of course!! 

I built them to the specks of what I found on this site, with the exception of making my own extension studs. I found that I needed at least 3.25 inches. So I went with 4” stud extensions to be safe. 

 

Studs were 3/4” hex stock drilled and tapped to 7/16-20. I ran 1.5” bolts through the back side of the hub, mounted the tires, and used the stud extension to hold the wheel on. Then I ran 3” threaded rod into the studs, and mounted my big spacer to that. 

Im very happy with the plowing grip and I can’t wait for it to rain again to see how it floats, or if I just spin more mud! 

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carterd

I notice no difference in the steering! I do need to make extenders for my plows now! 

I wouldn’t have done this if I didn’t have the extra tires and the scrap steel. But I’m really glad I did. I might have gone a bit over kill with the side of my material, but I wanted to give it the best chance to survive. 

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SimpleOrange

Fulcrums and pivoting points, your studs are doomed to fail they're much to long and will break at the tractor rim from excessive flexing.

One of the spacers below has holes that permit the socket extension access to torque the wheel nuts which would otherwise be obstructed.

Also the end of the spacer has been machined to fit the centre hole of the rim giving a more secure fit also releiving some stress from the wheel studs.

Fulcrums and pivots.

1ext.png

2ext.jpg

 

catapult-gif.gif

Edited by SimpleOrange
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SimpleOrange

My Allis 720 came with the wide boots and one of the rims has the holes worn oblong, this failure did not occur from loose wheel nuts but from a rim having to much negative offset.

neg.gif

Edited by SimpleOrange
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carterd

Thank you SimpleOrange. This was just a design from what I found in the "TechTips" section. I'm no designer, but I can copy decent enough. 

 

I'll take it apart this weekend and inspect it and paint it. I put it through some tuff work and stress, so I hope I will notice any wear starting to show. I was pushing trees and stumps in my woods and not only did the spacers have the stress of pushing weight, but its tight back there and I bounced each side off a tree way more then I wanted to. 

 

 

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carterd

This is my Parts list with McMaster Carr numbers. I'm posting JPEG images of the prints I used. 

 

1 Each) PN: 6512K41 (3/4"x6' bar)

1 Each) PN: 8910K12 (1/4"x6"x24" bar, cut to 4 pcs of 6x6)

1 Each) PN: 7767T73 (3"OD, 12" long Tube)

2 Packs) PN: 92620A699 (1-1/2" 7/16-20 grade 8 Bolts) Using two packs, this will eliminate the need for studs and nuts

 

The flange is VERY busy. For that, I am sorry. I'll take input on how you guys want to see it if you are machining it by what ever method. I could see a use for dimensions from the center for those that already have round plates and just want to put the 5 on 4.5" bolt pattern in.  Note, only two flanges need to be drilled and tapped. The other two will be clearance holes for a 7/16-20 bolt, which I used a 1/2 drill bit. Welding is required for the flanges to the flange spacer. 

The .257" holes are mounting holes for me to mount it to my fixture, then I run them in the CNC on lunch. 

I'm just a bumbling machinist, so keep that in mind when looking at these!

 

Sorry for the ugly paint mods. 

dually.JPG

 

 

 

Threaded Spacer.JPG

Duel Flange Spacer.JPG

Dual Flange.JPG

Edited by carterd
to much personal info in pics.
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carterd

Yes. This is off topic, but I love my job. The company I work for didnt have any programming software for the CNC bc no one before me knew how to use software like that.  Myself and an engineer were able to start from scratch and pick the best software for us. We chose solidcam, which runs inside solidworks. That felt good for us because it was a way for me to get my foot in the door on the engineering level, but also it makes it easier to train an engineer as my backup so I can take a sick day. Win/Win!!

 

 

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SimpleOrange

I participated in a project for an Allis fanatic on another forum were we had the hub for the rear PTO for his Allis 720 drawn up in 3D cad then the hub was machined on a multi axis cnc then passed over to EDM cnc to burn in the involute spline.

The cad work was done by a third party as I'm clueless, there's a another forum where you can post your job for bids. I had a bunch of paper drawings converted into dwg.

Those of you that know how to use cad will never be without a job.

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carterd

I have access to a standard 3 axis CNC mill and some manual toys. The last shop I was at had a wire EDM, and it was such an amazing machine! 

 

SimpleOrange, I forgot to mention that I am running the intter tires at 14 PSI, and the outers at 5 PSI. 

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Brettw

I would think, if you could make a sleeve to slide over the bolts, solid stock with 3/4" holes, that might keep the studs from twisting.  At that point however, i think a good piece of schedule 40 pipe and flanges welded on each end, one threaded for lug studs, would be eisier in the long run, if you do have access to machine tools and welders.   I too think that torque is going to affect the setup you have.  It is going to twist those studs and they will likely eventually fail due to stress fractures.  JMHO

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Snojetter
20 hours ago, carterd said:

Yes. This is off topic, but I love my job. The company I work for didnt have any programming software for the CNC bc no one before me knew how to use software like that.  Myself and an engineer were able to start from scratch and pick the best software for us. We chose solidcam, which runs inside solidworks. That felt good for us because it was a way for me to get my foot in the door on the engineering level, but also it makes it easier to train an engineer as my backup so I can take a sick day. Win/Win!!

I work as a design engineer for a packaging equipment manufacturer.  I use Solidworks probably 75% of my working day.  Love the software!  My previous job I was tasked with evaluating 3D CAD programs and it was a no-brainer that SW was the easiest to use.  That led me to the position I'm in now.  It sounds like you work for a pretty small company.  I went from being one of two engineers at my previous job to being one of dozens!

I'm no machinist, but have used CAD to design and build several woodworking projects and my shop building.  It's a nice tool to have for personal projects like this.  Wish I could could do my own metal working, but there are guys around here willing to help with access to all kinds of exciting tools, CNC's, and lasers.

 

19 hours ago, SimpleOrange said:

Those of you that know how to use cad will never be without a job.

I hope that's the case.  I like being employed!

Edited by Snojetter
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carterd

I'm willing to be the test pilot on this one then guys!! My apprentice is looking for practice in power taping, so I'll have him machine up a new set of adaptors!

 

I agree with you snojetter, I really like being employed!

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carterd

I've been thinking about the studs twisting, are we talking about the 7/16-20 studs? Those are threaded into the hex stock 1 3/4". I have grade 8 bolts to run in there in place of the studs. 

 

I also thought about welding support braces between the hex stock. 

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