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shaggyhill

Road for my B-10

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shaggyhill
I have a B-10 with ag tires and wheel weights but the path I have to drive up and down is unusable about 25% of the year due to muddy conditions. My idea is to gravel a path the width of the tractor so that I could go up and down when it is wet. Any opinions on what type of gravel to use -- size, cleaned or not cleaned -- put the gravel down and drive it in or lossen the dirt first before putting it down. One person even told me to remove the top few inches of soil first. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks, Paul

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AGCO918
REMOVE the sod as you were told to do ,then get a big size stone and then put a smaller stone on top of that and pack it down and you should be ready to use it. agco918 chad e shafer

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Al
Hi, Around here we use crushed limestone. If you use crusher run, or maccadam base it will have rocks in it up to 4 to 5 inches and the fines also. If you put a maccadam base 4 to 5" thick and then a 2" top coat of road rock with the fines in or even agricultural lime, you will have a drive like pavement, that you can drive cars on even when the ground is soft in the Spring and it will be hard. Good luck, Al

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Dutch
If your only going to driving your tractor on the path. 1) Remove the "black" dirt. 2) Build up the path above surrounding area with whatever "yellow" dirt you have (so the water drains off). 3) If you have to buy "yellow" dirt, buy gravel not fill. Gravel will probably cost more but it has stones in it and packs nice. The plus side to doing it this way is if you ever want to go back to "natural", you won't have a lot of stone to dig out. The negative side is the "yellow" dirt or gravel will develop ruts and low spots. Just use a grader blade a few times a year. If you want a more permanent path, do what the other guys suggest. Crushed used concrete makes a nice base and should be the least expensive to buy. Cover that with some RAP or millings, roll it and you'll have the next best thing to a paved road. If you go the 1,2,3 route and want an inexpensive covering, contact local roofing contractors. When they remove old "stoned" roofs they will usually give the old "stone" away for free. The "stone" used on roofs is usually slag, which is great for what you're doing.

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ka9bxg
Around here in Wisconsin cheep people like me use small stones picked from the fields.I take the black dirt down a few inches and use it else where.Put the small stones in and put a little gravel on top.Makes for a good drive way and water does not sit.Bob

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Brent_Baumer
The standard here is to remove 6-8" of topsoil and replace with about 3-5" of #2 crushed stone (rocks that are a bit bigger than a golf ball to a little smaller than a baseball) topped with about 3" of #53 crushed limestone (small, standard driveway stone). Compacted in layers. Just putting gravel down on the topsoil won't last. The soil will "eat" the stone in no time. Brent

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Guest
Paul, I brought in 100 yards of "CLASS 5" last summer and resurfaced my driveway. A mixture of course gravel and small stone. As long as the driveway is kept "crowned" it will last for years, rain washes off either direction. The class 5 was right over the top of my rough old goat trail i was calling a driveway. its really nice now. dougm

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shaggyhill
oh man, I was hoping somebody was going to say it would just be ok to keep adding gravel until the dirt stopped sucking it in. It is a long road -- so it looks like I have quite a job ahead of me. Thanks for all of the advice, Paul

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shaggyhill
Does anyone know the stats on how many sq ft a yard of gravel would cover at 1,2,3... inches deep? The path has got to be at least three hundred feet long, and it would have to be at least three feet wide. If I put 4'' of gravel, how many yards would that be. Thanks, Paul

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StinKy
Most likely someone else has already said it only using different nomenclature but I graded off topsoil to depth of 8" then put down 6" of what is locally called "bank run" ungraded and unwashed material, then topped off with about 6" of 2-RC gravel. It's been there 15 years with no problems. Dick

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PatRarick
At 4 inches deep and three feet wide, one yard of gravel would take you 27 feet, so you would need a minimum of 11 yards. I think that three feet wide would be pretty narrow though. You would have to drive awfully straight at that width, and if you slid off into the mud you would just tear up a part of the road to get back on. Pat

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Brent_Baumer
Never heard of ordering by the yard. Around here it's by the ton, and I usually let the pit figure out how much based on my dimesions. They are always right on. Brent

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Dutch
Paul, If you will only be using the path for your tractor, and you're not in any big hurry to get the job done, forget what I said above. Buy a truck load of gravel and put it right on top of whatever you have now. It may work fine for your use. Just make sure it's above grade so the water runs off.

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MPH
If your going to have to mow along this road, I'd say take out like 2 inches of dirt, plowed to each side, put in your 4 inches of gravel then backfill your gravel road with the top soil. My mowers don't seem to like gravel..MPH

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PatRarick
Brent, I'm not sure, but I believe most gravel pits are or have converted to a ton, rather than a yard as a measure. It's been about five years since I purchased gravel, but at that time, I ordered by the yard and paid by the ton. Pat

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shaggyhill
One more question about what MPH referred to -- I am just picturing myself going up this hill with my tires spinning in the gravel. At this point I'm thinking that if I just added gravel directly to the dirt and kept adding it as needed this would at least "hold" the gravel somewhat in place. The purpose for the improved road is because of the incline -- it is steep. I am seeing myself on the steepest sections sitting on three inches of rock spinning my tires. Would the size of the stone make any difference? Also my greatest problem is not going up, but going down. February I set the record with forty foot skid marks. Thanks again, Paul

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