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wwbragg

Welder swap

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wwbragg

I purchased a 90 amp Chicago Electric (Harbor Freight) flux shielded MIG welder from craigslist.  Used it a couple of times but then came across a Hobart 125 gas shield MIG welder.  But now I have two MIG welders.  The guy at the local hardware store asked if I wanted to trade.  So now I have the Hobart and an Airco 100 amp 220 volt AC stick welder.  Got metal??

HF welder.jpg

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720nut

Wendell, I'm unfamiliar with the Hobart 125, but if it's anything like the 140 I've had for years then It'll do ya good.

I to had a Chicago Electric years ago and didn't like the fact that when you touch metal you better be ready to weld without pulling trigger.

Hope ya enjoy, just my $.02

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wwbragg
2 hours ago, 720nut said:

Hobart 125,

The settings table on the side panel says the most it will handle is 1/8".  But I have used it to make an engine mounting plate which welds 1/8 to 1/4 stock (in my blog).  It holds but isn't real pretty but I think that is an operator skill issue.  I'm hoping the Airco unit will handle thicker material.

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gwiseman

I bought a Hobart 125EZ at TSC on closeout sale. Wanted a 140 but $ difference was too great for my hobby needs. The EZ has only 4 settings and is for beginner/novice welder but I've welded 1/4" with good results. Yes Wendell, sometimes looks like the birds flew over & plopped the weld but hold vs looks; it holds. I'm sold on Hobart quality.

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wwbragg
32 minutes ago, gwiseman said:

beginner/novice welder

Yup. that's me.  someone said bad welding and good grinding = good welding.  I'm all ok that.

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Alltractoredup

I have had my Hobart 125 for a year and love it.  Results are as expected for a 115volt set up.  I too have had good success welding 1/4" steel.  Enjoy!

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spi

I have been impressed by the H.F. 170 flux/mig. been using it for 5 or 6 years, both flux and mig.. For what I payed, I will have my monies worth if it gives up tomorrow.

Most likely just the right parts came down the line at just the right time.

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wwbragg
3 hours ago, spi said:

impressed by the H.F. 170

Of course the 170 is going to be a little hotter than the 90 I traded away.  But my shop is FULL of HF stuff.  I paid for my HF wheel changer the first time I used it.

Here a pic of my practice welds and first final product.  I have found that thorough preparation is vital.  As for skill level, I'll say again. "bad welding and good grinding equals good welding."  Not too bad for an old accountant.  You know what they say?  "Old accountants never die, they just lose their balance."

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PhanDad
12 hours ago, wwbragg said:

"bad welding and good grinding equals good welding." 

Sounds similar to lots of spackle and good sanding equals good spackling.  sm00

 

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720nut

Practice , practice , practice , is what my dad and a couple old friends always told me.

Learning to weld was probably one of my dad's most important things for me to learn, thank you dad for being so persistant and an occasional foot LOL

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lugnard

Just a thought on the pics of your welds. ( I also have a Hobart..well 2 as my 120 gave out at the wrong time and I bought a 140...then got the 120 fixed...) Try and slow down on your travel rate and let the weld puddle fill in. Get the wire speed set so you have a nice crisp crackle to the sound. For thicker stuff ..vee the work and consider a bit of a weave with your puddle and slow down to let it fill.

Sometimes pushing the puddle helps to get a more flatter weld instead of a humped one but it all depends on what you are doing.  I try and use smaller wire in the 120 as I seem to get a better weld. Also buy good (Hobart) wire.

Harry

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lugnard

Can't see the stick welder to good but some tips for that would be about the same for wire welding in that you need to slow down and let the weld fill in. Sometimes it seems you should not go that slow but it works better. Also hold a tighter arc as in closer to the material, increasing the arc length will also increase the voltage and make a more hotter/violent weld. Sometimes it is needed. Again, buy good name brand rods. I usually use 6013 but there are many rods to choose from depending on the use. I also usually use a 1/8 rod.

I was showing my daughter how to stick weld along with her boyfriend...we each had masks on and I would coach her in what to do....tighter arc...slow down...less angle or more angle... etc. She layed a bead down that was amazing and her boy friend with the same prompts from me couldn't. Needless to say he was not happy!!!

Harry

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wwbragg
3 hours ago, lugnard said:

slow down

 

3 hours ago, lugnard said:

tighter arc

I was afraid of burning through the 1/8 inch angle iron but everyone who sees the result is telling me the same thing.  Thanks for the input.

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