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joelk

Rear blade experience?

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Ron_B
Have center grader blade with rake attachment.It is hydraulic.It has lots of down preasure,works real siick.I have it on a little larger tractor.Cant beat it for doing rough or fine grade work.---Ron B

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joelk
I see Brinly-Hardy has a blade (about $130) that uses a sleeve hitch adapter. I am jealous all the grader blade talk and wondering if anyone has tried the rear blade? It seems to me that you could apply pressure with the lift arm on the tractor ( mine is not hydraulic ) and mimic the foot pressure on the grader blade. Any comments appreciated. Joelk

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JDSnyder
By putting down pressure on a belly mount blade with your feet, you have some degree of control over the angle of cut in relation to the ground, like if you want to cut one side down farther and fill in more on the other. If you don't have a hydrolift to provide down pressure, though, the more you push down with your feet, the more you unweight the tractor seat and lessen wheel traction, so you start to spin if you're cutting hard stuff. It sure is fun, though! Jeff Snyder

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HubbardRA
I've used a front blade. Don't have any experience with the belly or rear blades. If it does what you want and you enjoy using it that is all that counts. There are pictures of some rear blades in the gallery. I think there was also a rear blade on one of the home built loaders. The one thing I can imagine is that the belly blade is the easiest to watch and control. Both the front and rear blades are hard to see. Rod H.

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MPH
Joelk, from using my landscape rake that I mounted on the B112 I know these little guys can pull a lot more than push. Only problem I have is when the rear tire goes over a rock or bump the rake/blade looses most of its load. Not sure how it would compare with a footdraggers grader blade cuz they are way to much fun..MPH

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Dutch
Like Marty stated, a rear blade is best for "pulling" material. A front blade is best for "pushing". You just have to contend with the blade riding up and over or digging in. When it comes to "grading", a blade mounted between the front and rear axles works best. The reason is that the axles "bridge" the high and low spots and the blade "shaves" the difference. With enough effort and experience a blade mounted anywhere will do a satisfactory job by using a combination of pushing and back-dragging material. A heavy center mounted grader blade just makes fine grading a lot easier without too much or too little material moving. When trying to fine grade an existing road, the one thing you want to avoid is unnecessary disturbance of the already compacted material. You'll wind up with a muddy mess the first time it rains. That's why contractors use a road grader instead of a bulldozer. I will be mounting a serrated blade on the front, center, and rear of a tractor and post pictures. Hopefully next week. http://home.gwi.net/~dclough/50.gif

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Woodydel
I use a rear blade or to be specific a box blade made by Brinly. It works great and if you reverse it you can push backwards. The biggest advantage with the box blade is material builds up inside the "box" and fills in the low spots. It also has brackets for cement blocks. It works better than a front blade. Woody

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Woodydel
It works on both..I've noticed the 1/2" thick dimensions for the grader blades but my blade hasn't bent yet. The scarifier pops off with one pin..We've had discussions before about this. Slow and easy is the way to go. Use low gear..Woody[A href='http://www.simpletractors.com/clubhouse/ShowMessage.asp?MsgID=5990&mode=short&startwith=0']http://www.simpletractors.com/clubhouse/ShowMessage.asp?MsgID=5990&mode=short&startwith=0[/a]

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Woodydel
If what you are cutting is hard enough where you must stand on your blade you should be using a blade with scarifiers. The teeth dig in to break up the hard packed material. You then go back to grade off the broken up material. It works on a rear grader blade just fine..Woody

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