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SmilinSam

Making a Right hand Lift lever- the prototype

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SmilinSam
A year ago someone asked (I believe HappyJack) if a Broadmoor lift lever could be converted to a right lift lever for the bigger tractors. Well, I finally got one done. I had a quadrant for the 3400/7000/7100 series from a friend and cut it apart to use as a pattern. Worked well using it that way, and is not a big deal to make really if one has a torch, a grinder and a welder. I used 1/4" x 3" angle iron for the bracket part of the quadrant and cut to the pattern. Then I used some 3/16" flat for the catch/guide part cutting it to the pattern. The piece that bolts to your lift shaft bracket is made from 3/16" thick by 1 1/2" wide flat. Two holes were drilled to bolt the flat to the bracket. A third hole was drilled in the flat a where the center of the lift shaft would be. Then a 3" x 5/8" bolt was inserted and welded in place at the front and then the head was ground off the back side and the area was then welded too and ground flat again. The Broadmoor lever simply had the shaft ground off the lower part and a 5/8" collar welded to the side facing the tractor at the lower end where the hole now was. Seems to look like it will work. Club Vice President Les Krieffels will be the recipient of this to try on his equipment and give us a good evaluation. If this works OK I WILL NOT be building these for people but I will work on getting a pattern kit together to send Kent so he can put it in the do it yourself section . Hopefully you guys can print it out in actual size from there.(Give me till after Rhinelander though) Thanks, SmilinSam http://a6.cpimg.com/image/F4/7B/10185716-ff85-02740258-.jpg

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MPH
Sam: Very nice! I can't wait for the patterns. If I can't build it, I know my dad can. He has built complete cabs for antique Mack trucks from the teens and twenties, from flat stock, using a plasma cutter, mig welder, etc..., as part of his restorations of these trucks. Good luck with the evaluation. (Les--can't wait for your thoughts!) Btw, is that a fuel cell or steam-powered tractor? LoL. I don't see an engine showing.... Thanks Sam! Peter

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HubbardRA
Looks very good Sam. In fact with the correct drawings and patterns, even the arm and the quadrant could be fabricated. By the way, what attachments require the right hand lift? Putting together a snow plow blade, which is used on it? Got two tractors, but only mowers at the moment. Rod H.

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Dutch
Sam, Nice looking job! Glad somebody finally did something. When did you find the time to do it? I've been thinking of a couple of ideas for about a year, but they haven't found their way from my mind to the shop yet....... and I can't be as busy as you.

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Kent
Rod, The right lift lever allows you to use two implements at one time. You can use the right lift lever with either a front or center-mounted attachment, and use the left lift lever (or hydraulic, if you have it) for a rear implement at the same time. Examples, (1) tiller and dozer blade or Johnny Bucket... use the tiller to loosen the soil and the dozer or bucket to move and spread it... (2) tiller and mower deck... leave the deck on for additional weight. I've seen people "chain up" their deck just to keep it on, while using a tiller without a second lift lever. (3) snowblower and grader blade... use the grader blade to move any snow missed with the snowblower over beside the "uncut" snow so it can be picked up on the next pass... I'm sure there's many more, those just came quickly to mind. Kent

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TomSchmit
For you guys wanting to do this, I have at least one Broadmoor lift lever available. Also, your should know that the front wheel spindles on the Broadmoors will accept the larger 8" wheels used on the large frame tractors. These 8" wheels have real bearings instead of the bushings used on the stock 6" wheels - much better for carrying all that weight on the front! Tom Schmit tjs@liphatech.com

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SmilinSam
Big Six, Thats my test tractor I'm building to test engines in. If you notice in the picture I have notched the frame to accept the old B- Series engines as well. This gives me a bed to not only run the engines but give them a good workout in. Dutch, I "had" to get it done because I promised Les this as part of a trade we made. Said I'd have it to him this week. Really it wasn't all that bad, only took about 2 hours to do. 2nd time around it should take less time as I am aquainted now with the process. I really wouldn't recommend using a front attachment with the right levers other than the 42" light weight blade. The 46" blade sticks out too far and is too heavy for the lesser leverage of the shorter Right hand lift. The johhny bucket would be way too heavy I think. A guy could alwys try it, but thats my opinion form using one of these levers.

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Dutch
Rod, I don't think twin hydro cylinders is a crazy idea. Maybe that's because I have also thought (still thinking) of three. Factory OEM lift for center, outside frame for front, inside frame for rear. Obtaining and mounting the correct cylinders should not present any real problems. The challenge would be obtaining and mounting a compact valve pack to have a professional finished installation. I have considered a triple valve pack with mechanical levers (bulky and complicated), OEM valve & lever with a 3-way diverter valve (can only activate one cylinder at a time), triple solenoid valve pack with a 3-position joy stick (expensive). I enjoy these engineering excercises (even if crazy). What are your thoughts?

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MPH
Sam: I'm gonna expose my ignorance here. Since you raise a point I hadn't even considered, i.e., the decreased lifting capacity of the r/h lift lever, due to it's shorter length, I've got to ask: Why can't a L/H lift lever be used on the right side? Would it have to operate backwards? I know this is probably one of those "duh" things that should be obvious to me, but I'm too lazy to go out and look at my tractor to try to puzzle it out myself. The reason I ask is, I think I'd like a R/H lift lever that was equal in capacity to the left, for more flexibility of operation. Not criticizing at all, just curious.... Still would like to do the R/H lever, even if it must be one that can lift less than the L/H one. Peter

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SmilinSam
Peter, Its more a matter of leverage at the point of lift than length of lever. The left lever is longer but you are also turning the lift shaft directly with that lever giving you alot more leverage. On the right lift you are not "turning" the lift shaft, you are simply using the lift shaft as a block to pull the lever against. To get more leverage you wouldn't need to lenghten the lever, you would need to move the move the lift rod to the blade down closer to the lift shaft on the tractor. But, doing that reduces the amount of travel considerably. Do you follow me?

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HubbardRA
Dutch, All my tractors, cars, trailers, etc. have been modified (boogered up) in some way. It seems that I always think I can improve on anything. I'm going to build the front end loader on the Sears. Don't care if it looks original or not. Just want it to work right. When I do this, I am also going to develop a power steering set-up. Thinking about a modified rack and pinion from a small car. What do you think? Rod H.

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