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Rear lift on the 7112


thedaddycat

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thedaddycat

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I am putting a rear lift on the 7112. I got the rear bracket from club member Bird78Mojo and other parts from SmilinSam. The bracket was a tad long for my tractor and I trimmed about 1/4" from the right end in order to

get it to fit. I had the step collar all the way in tight and just could not get it in without the trim job.

Here are four clevis brackets that I have. The first is threaded 3/8"-16 to match the turnbuckle but the pin is too small and if I drill this clevis out for the right size pin, it will be too thin and weak to handle the job.

The second clevis is threaded 1/2-13 NC and I have threaded rod in that size but the pin on this one is also too small. It does have enough meat to be drilled out if needed.

The third clevis has a much deeper throat depth but it is threaded 1/2-20 NF and I do not have rod threaded in that thread but I do have a tap and die. If necessary, I would overthread the 1/2-13 rod with the 1/2-20 die to make what I needed. I've done this sort of thing before...

The last clevis is a pipe hanger, again threaded for 1/2-13 but this pin is way too big for the rear hitch. I could sleeve it if I had to in order to fit a smaller (correct size) pin. So how do we adapt a 1/2-13 to a 3/16-16?

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Here's my solution. Chuck the 1/2-13 rod up in the drill and set it to counter-rotate the bench grinder. Here the coarse stone is on the left so forward rotation on the drill and come at the grinder from the left side. Once the diameter is close to right, reverse rotation on the drill, switch to the fine stone on the right side and come at it from the right side, and carefully take off a bit at a time until you can get the die to start threading onto the ground down shaft.

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I dug out some stainless jam nuts for both threads. Now the clevis is one end of the turnbuckle and I have a way to compensate for cable stretch.

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I can attach the cable directly to the turnbuckle if desired.  
Can anyone see any flaws with this solution? I will need to crimp one end of the cable and then set the length as needed for the other end.

Edited by PhanDad
Title spelling
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SmilinSam
12 hours ago, thedaddycat said:

Can anyone see any flaws with this solution? I will need to crimp one end of the cable and then set the length as needed for the other end.

The only thing that I could see that might be a problem is with the length and bulkiness of the turnbuckle . It might hang up on parts of the transmission sticking up when lifting or lowering the rear attachment.

Here is one way I have done the setup before.

 

 

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This particular clevis is not adjustable, however I have taken a threaded clevis like you have pictured above and  procured a bolt with the correct fine threads, cut the head off, drilled it out through the center, slid the cable through...then used just one crimp leaving a litlte of the cable sticking through like above- then frayed it out a bit and filled the frayed part with acid core solder. Just my poor way of insuring that the cable wont pull through the crimp when a load is applied. It was working while I had that tractor it was on. Dont know if it kept working after I sold it or not.

 

Here is the other end of  this cable...similar to what you have done above,

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3 hours ago, Bill725 said:

FYI, new rear lift cable, P/N 165753SM, $72 from SEPW.

I think that you left out a number, I believe it is 1657563SM

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thedaddycat

I guess we're going to play find the weak link... Tack weld fixed the eye of the turnbuckle Karma then the crimp pulled out on the front end where it attaches to the rock shaft.

I ordered the new rear cable today. I'm still going to try to fix this, but I'm wondering why my moldboard plow put so much strain on the lift cable.

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I used two cable clamps to fix the eye on the front end. They hit on the tinwork underneath so I can only lower down three notches from full up right now.

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I wonder if the plow digging down into the ground is causing the stress. I worked the adjuster loose and set it to about fully out which angles the tip upwards a bit. I also added the coulter from the spring tine harrow.

 

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If you raise your dozer blade and rest it on a spare tire or something you can set your collars on the lift rod so it stays high up. Presto! !! Instant front counterweight.

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Edited by thedaddycat
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  • 2 months later...
nick farina

Hey @thedaddycat , this is kind of an unrelated question, but I am setting up a rear lift for myself and am wondering what the bolt that goes in the rear lift tube is called, I'd like to track one down for myself.

 

Here is an arrow pointing to it on the photo you posted above:

 

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Edited by nick farina
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Talntedmrgreen

I’ve never seen the homemade cables last that long. There’s a good used cable with the adjustable clevis, pulley, bushing and all the hardware on Facebook for $50

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thedaddycat
On 8/5/2021 at 10:40 AM, nick farina said:

Hey @thedaddycat , this is kind of an unrelated question, but I am setting up a rear lift for myself and am wondering what the bolt that goes in the rear lift tube is called, I'd like to track one down for myself.

 

Here is an arrow pointing to it on the photo you posted above:

 

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Hey Nick, that thing is just a length of 1" bar stock that I ground down and drilled two holes through. The first hole is to the far right in this pic and is for the pin that holds it to the rear lift tube. The second hole is for attaching the hook/clevis/whatever.

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Here is picture of what I have on my 7119.  My 710 has a factory clevis but no adjustment, My 917 has the adjustable clevis but I have never adjusted it.  So I figure "who needs adjustment".   

I have lifted rototillers, revitalizers, and mold board plows hundreds of times over the many years since it was installed, and even the front of other tractors when I stick the tow hook in.

I know the total cost was below $10.

BTW the total length eye to eye is 41-1/8"

 

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  • 10 months later...

Building a top lift for the 916H I recently bought. Can someone tell me how far the shaft extends past the bracket to the left when facing the back of the tractor and the diameter of the shaft? Been looking and have not been able to find those 2 dimensions. Thanks

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On 8/7/2021 at 6:48 PM, MikeES said:

My 917 has the adjustable clevis but I have never adjusted it.  So I figure "who needs adjustment".   

FYI, the adjustable clevis is used to level the rear lift to ground.

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Here is my 2 cents. May give folks some ideas for adaptation.

I had a local logging equipment supply make me a cable. They used a 300 ton press to crimp the steel ferrules. It's not coming apart. I'm thinking it was in the $30.00 range.

I miscalculated the length, and the clevis was too small, so I added a couple of bent steel adapters to make it fit the lift bracket. The other end is a simple loop. I stuck a thick nut into the loop to make it fit snugly into the rockshaft slot.

 

cable end 2.jpg

cable end.jpg

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On 5/12/2021 at 8:55 AM, thedaddycat said:

I ordered the new rear cable today. I'm still going to try to fix this, but I'm wondering why my moldboard plow put so much strain on the lift cable

I think the load on the cable would be surprising. I have wondered what it would be. I am no physics major, but a simple lever force multiplier = distance from fulcrum x weight. The cable attachment is 4-1/2" from the hinge pin on the lift. If you hang a 120 lb plow on the other side of the hinge, on say a 30" long hitch, that would equate to an 800 lb load on the cable! Then jerk it a few times by hitting a rock or root, or simply by bouncing the implement while getting to and from the work site..

I don't have a plow, but an earthcavator weighs that much, and it takes two arms and two legs to lift it with a hand lever - (the opposite end force multiplier).

You need to check the load rating of the hardware - A 1/4" stainless turnbuckle like that shown has a working load rating of 65 lbs. And here is a quote from the data for ferrules used to make loops with a hand operated swaging tool.

"Ferrule and stops aluminum size 3/16 inch. Safe working Load 740 pounds. Product Overview: Designed to make strong wire rope loops. Not designed for load bearing applications."

So, it's not surprising that cables made from Ace hardware parts that look pretty good don't last long.

Edited by AC710
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On 5/12/2021 at 8:55 AM, thedaddycat said:

If you raise your dozer blade and rest it on a spare tire or something you can set your collars on the lift rod so it stays high up. Presto! !! Instant front counterweight.

I was scratching my head about this statement, and I don't think it is true unless your rear cable is set up on the rock shaft for a 38" tiller - the cable goes over the rock shaft loop to the front clevis instead of over the pulley to the rear clevis. Set up normally, you are lifting both the dozer and plow - like bird wings flapping. It actually adds the torque needed to lift them. With the tiller setup, it is like a teeter totter with one going up and the other going down, acting as counterweights.

In either case, it would not change the load on the rear cable.

I have set up my 7016 with earthcavator and dozer blade so both can be used on the same machine, so it aids versatility and requires less lift lever power. (It works OK, but two machines are better).

 

earthcablade.jpg

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