Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

steve-wis

Tiller tines

Recommended Posts

steve-wis

Hello!

I know that new tines for our simplicity tillers are almost impossible to find and worth their weight in gold if you do find them.  Has anyone checked into a possible fit with tines from other brands?  I see on Ebay that a full set for bolens, craftsman, etc can be bought for about $50 or so.  I don't know how you would find dimensions for them to see if they might fit ours tho, and was wondering if anyone else has.

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gwiseman
26 minutes ago, steve-wis said:

Hello!

I know that new tines for our simplicity tillers are almost impossible to find and worth their weight in gold if you do find them.  Has anyone checked into a possible fit with tines from other brands?  I see on Ebay that a full set for bolens, craftsman, etc can be bought for about $50 or so.  I don't know how you would find dimensions for them to see if they might fit ours tho, and was wondering if anyone else has.

Steve

@Chris727 has them I think. I was lucky to find a set from a member who was parting a tiller out. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris727

This is a common source of confusion. The tines for the 36" tillers are unique to those models. The tines from the 32" FDT tillers are much more common and are the same as on many of the Simplicity Roticul walk-behind tillers. I believe there may be aftermarket tines that will fit those tillers. Using those narrower tines on a 36" might result poor tilling due to insufficient overlap between tines. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steve-wis

I actually have a 32 inch tiller hanging on the back of an Allis 919H.  And, the rear tires are on wheels with a deeper offset than standard, so the tires are quite a bit wider than the tiller.  But, for the little bit that I use the thing I am ok with that, at least until I find someone who might what to do an even swap for a 36 inch one.  Mine is very loose and needs to be opened up and redone, but the tines are so worn, almost gone, that I hate to put that work into it if I can't replace the tines for a decent price.  I will need to check the hole spacing on other makes and see if they would fit, or could be made to fit.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tarheel

Steve, I picked up a number of tines from a member a number of years back. I changed out what I had and have enough to do so once again (along with others I have collected).  My garden is only 100 ft x 110. Not small exactly but 10 rows of sweet corn takes up the bulk of it. Anyway, I don't so much mind the price of new tines or even the trouble of changing them. What bothers me is the short life. As is I'm getting maybe 3 or 4 years before they wear to the point of leaving a strip in the center.

 I have noticed in a number of your posts that you weld. I'm not a real welder by any means but I love it and own 3 MIGs. One being an old Napa branded Lincoln 180 amp and 2 are 110 units. I have one 200 amp DC TIG/stick unit I bought off Amazon and have yet to use (did not come with consumables and no vendors near by) 2 DC Wisconsin 2 cylinder engine stick welders, 2 ac/dc buzz boxes and a handful of ac only buzz boxes.

 Anyway, as I said, I'm not a real welder. Give me known steel in a flat position and I can do an ok job with most of the above. And can do so to a point Uphill, downhill and even overhead, with MIG. But get out of position with a stick and all bets are off. There is simply to much to learn.

 Anyway, Back to tiller tines. There a quite a few options for those who can weld when it comes to tines.

 You can buy tines say for a Troy bilt, Cut them in the bend (or higher because of temper) and weld to your tines.

 You can build up the tines you have with weld. Lay in a good supply of side grinder wheels, wire and shielding gas and think of it as seat time on your welder LOL. All jokes aside, this could be a viable option. I have in the past few days learned that carbon steel wire is sold for MIG and flux core and that hard facing wire is made as well ( only found it in flux core so far. Something I know little about and have almost zero time with.)

 Then there is a guy on YouTube who cut his tines and welded on mild steel. I found his video because I had thought of doing the same with carbon steel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tarheel

Though I'm not sure how much longer, if any the carbon steel would last. The red clay here is pretty abrasive. While I am pretty sure there are steels that will handle it, ( leading edge on snow plow blades for example) I'm not sure how well it welds and I spent almost a full work day with a very heavy Black and Decker (Wildcat or some such) grinding bevels on a piece of it for making a machete. I am not so hard headed nor do I have the strength or endurance to repeat that ordeal.

 A medium grade carbon steel like 1055 is very easy to heat treat (heat till a magnet won't stick and drop in a bucket of water) And also easy to temper (place in an oven at 4 or 500 degrees I'm guessing for 1 hour let cool to room temp the back in for another hour same temp).

 When and if I ever get around to doing any of the above, I'll try and post about it.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ShaunE
8 hours ago, Tarheel said:

 I have noticed in a number of your posts that you weld.

 

8 hours ago, Tarheel said:

What bothers me is the short life. As is I'm getting maybe 3 or 4 years before they wear to the point of leaving a strip in the center.

I agree with the above statement.  One of the several Powermax tillers that have passed through my hands had all the tines built up with weld.  And there really is no need to side grind them.  No different from weld being added to snowblower shoes.  I will also add that there have been several debates over the years between the 32", 36" & the 38" H.D. tillers.  Having currently owning all 4 (48" Powermax tiller included) I will say aside from the Powermax tiller, my opinion is the 38" H.D. tiller does the best job.  There is no strip in the center with the 38" tiller.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Recent Status Updates

    • SonOfCreepfeed

      SonOfCreepfeed

      Thinkin' about this old girl.

      · 1 reply
    • Dean McFadden

      Dean McFadden

      Good morning peeps! I’m always searching for helpful information with my AC collection. Hope to find out new information and pass on my own experience in restoration. Here are some pics of my babies. I’m still looking for front rims for the 410 so yesterday I put the 310 wheels on took it for a drive. Working pretty good but still needs some carb work. Gotta get the 310 running next. Have a great day!😁
       

      · 1 reply
  • Adverts

×