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Electric lift overload


AC710

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Today I tried adding a stinger to the rear lift on my 7016 to pick up a snowblower and move it around. It's a 250 lb beast. The electric actuator would not lift it and made a clicking sound when it hit the full load. My question - does the actuator have an overload safety function? I'm thinking the same ratchet that clicks at the end of travel also functions as an overload "cutout".

It seems to work normally without that big load, although I did not hook up any implements to test it.

 

 

blower hauling.jpg

Edited by AC710
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Got to remember that both the front and rear lifts, lift by pivoting up the implement.  So they are not seeing full weight of the implement.

Picture looks like you are out away from pivot about 2+ feet.

 

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The electric lifts will lift a 300 lb  38" HD tiller, but not out at the end of a rod. Also , with those tillers the instructions call to pin the rear lift cable onto the upper lift pin point on the liftshaft quadrant.  This makes the rear lift operate like a footdragger tractor by pushing the lift lever forward.to raise the load. With the cable pinned as such I think you can then use a front counterweight to balance the rear lift load.

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13 hours ago, GregB said:

Picture looks like you are out away from pivot about 2+ feet.

 

I found out it won't lift the weight at that distance, It did lift it at about 12" out, but not high enough, so I extended it some.

12 hours ago, SmilinSam said:

you can then use a front counterweight to balance the rear lift load.

I knew about the counterweight function - the tractor is actually set up that way. The counterweight did not occur to me, but I may try that next time I want to move this blower, thanks

What about the original question? Is the actuator supposed to skip like that when overloaded? That would seem to be much better than overheating the motor or breaking gears and stuff., but I am wondering if it's working right.

p.s. I ended up standing the blower on end and carting it around strapped to a 2-wheel handcart...Doh.

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11 hours ago, AC710 said:

p.s. I ended up standing the blower on end and carting it around strapped to a 2-wheel handcart...Doh.

Done that here many a time...

11 hours ago, AC710 said:

What about the original question? Is the actuator supposed to skip like that when overloaded?

Been a long time since I operated a electric lift, but I think they are designed to click/bypass at the end of the stroke to prevent gear damage. It may be that they also click/bypass in an overload situation too. Cant say for sure, but others may know/remember more than I and drop a note on it.

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On 8/17/2022 at 6:20 AM, SmilinSam said:

I think they are designed to click/bypass at the end of the stroke to prevent gear damage.

 

I found this article that I think describes what's in these actuators to provide overloading protection. It is a mechanical torque limiter. I have had them apart and there is a heavy duty spring loaded mechanism at one end of the main screw. It works in both directions at the end of travel and would also work if it's overloaded.

Ball detent designs for torque limiters

The ball detent style of torque limiter uses a series of balls or rollers to connect the drive element and the driven elements. The balls or rollers are positioned in mating sockets or detents in both the drive and driven elements and held in position under normal operating conditions by spring force. When a torque overload occurs, the balls or rollers overcome the spring pressure and force the drive and driven element apart. The balls or rollers then slide out of the sockets. This disconnects the driving and driven elements from each other so they rotate relative to each other in tracks around the plates.

Some torque limiters are designed so that when the overload is removed, spring pressure forces the balls back into the detents. This restores the drive connection, while others must be manually reset. Ball detent torque limiters more accurately control the torque value at which the load is disengaged and their response is more predictable than shear pins or friction torque limiters.

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