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Simplicity 725 sluggish and slow to get into gear


DreMetalwork

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Hey everyone, I'm wondering if anyone could point me through initial troubleshooting of a problem.  On my 61 simplicity 725 while switching through all of the gears 1-3 and R. The tractor is very slow and sluggish to get up to speed, if at all the correct speed. I have not encountered this problem throughout the few months of ownership. The engine is running fine and in reverse and 2nd gear it seems to get up to speed the fastest. I did check the fluid levels in the transmission and BGB (today) and they do seem like I can add some fluid to them. So I will start with that. Any other suggestions? Thanks in advance.

I'll attach a video of me switching through the gears it's not the best video angle to judge the speed of the tractor, but if I give a the tractor a little "giddy up" if you will in third it seems to move a little faster up to speed.

https://imgur.com/a/VvgXTe1 (the video) 

 

 

Edited by DreMetalwork
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I appreciate the suggestions sarge. I found a section in a simplicity manual for a idler tension adjustment. I will look through that and see if it is something I need to do. As for the belt, it seems to look fine, it does have a slight crack in it though. Do you suggest replacing the belt or just  making sure it is running with the right tension? 

Edited by DreMetalwork
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If the belt is old enough to have a crack in it, it might be old enough to have lost some "grip" on the pulleys.  I'd swap out the belt for a new one.  If nothing changed, I would put the old one back on and save the new one for a spare. ('cause I'm a cheap-skate &:))

Edited by dhoadley
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Sounds good Dhoadley, I'll try a new belt and see if gets her moving any better, when I'm watching the belt in neutral the belt seem to be moving on the pulleys fine but obviously I haven't been able to see what happens to the clutch belt when I move through the gears, but my knowledge is limited on how the belt should engage with the pulleys. Cross my fingers, appreciate the help man!! 

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Man you guys are good!! I had  a spare belt the same circumference so I replaced it quite simply. After turning on the tractor and putting it gear and releasing the brake/clutch it immediately started moving. I hadn't felt it move with that power before. However, I now might need an adjustment, because   when I put it into third gear it jump and did a pretty big  wheelie. It even wheelied a bit on putting it into second. Is that something that can be correct? Or is it a possibility of my  belt being too tight now? Thanks for the help so far, it's very appreciated!!

Dan

 

* Thanks for the help to both Sarge and DHoadley!! I just want to say the problem is fully resolved, I just started releasing the clutch/brake much much slower and then there is no wheelie/jumping happening. Really very appreciative of the help,  cheers guys!!

 

 

 

Edited by DreMetalwork
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The clutch and brake adjustment instructions are in the owners manual. Go to the Simplicity Manufacturing website and download using Mfg No. 990235. Adjust clutch to 3/4" and brake to 1".

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Bill, I will check those adjustments and measurements when the rain lets up. Thanks for the information. I have been researching about both of those adjustments throughout the day.

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12 hours ago, DreMetalwork said:

when I put it into third gear it jump and did a pretty big  wheelie. It even wheelied a bit on putting it into second. Is that something that can be correct?

Since the belt replacement was effective in fixing your failure to launch, you now need clutch management. The clutch on these is primitive but effective. There are four or more things you can do after making the manual-spec adjustments:

1.  Most Important! Find the "sweet spot" as you are letting out the clutch pedal. You should let the clutch out slowly until you feel it start to engage. Then STOP and just feather it out gingerly as the tractor starts to move. Once it's going let the clutch out all the way. Any manual clutch works this way - everything happens over a tiny increment of the pedal travel, and every one is different. I have one tractor that is very easy to engage and another nearly identical one that will snap your neck off if you miss the spot (i.e. "pop the clutch"). It also helps on these if you can rest your heel on the footrest and use your ankle for better control. Adjusting the seat to pedal distance sometimes helps. 

2. In higher gears, start at a slower throttle speed and throttle up after you get going.

3. Clean any rust off the pulley grooves and polish them up.

4. Rub the belt down with a bar of soap. This will give it a little slip to help in engagement.

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There is also (2) different hole locations for the clutch idler pulley. You will need to find out which one works out best. Also, the Simplicity clutch belt P/N is 2154273SM which is 42.3" long and an aftermarket belt like a Gates 6942 is 42.0" long.

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AC710! That is some further invaluable information for me, having not grown up using a tractor like this I am learning new things and the ins-n-out of normal usage everyday.
  
Clutch Management was certainly the word of the day yesterday. Having never had a good belt engaging the pulleys I didn't fully understand the the need to gingerly release the clutch at the right moment. After about two wheelies though, the ghost of Evil Knievel popped out on me and told me I wasn't ready for stunt tractoring and to ease way up on that clutch. I appreciate that list of tips on safe and better engagement. it will certainly, keep me out of unknowingly doing a backflip. 
 

It was truly eye opening seeing how much pull and power this tractor has, I had noooo idea, I was grinning ear to ear! I really can't wait for the snow to start coming cuase I CAN NOT wait to start pushing snow with it lol.

I just finished fabricating a pretty new aluminum gas tank for it and I'm gonna weld up some chains for her in the next two weeks. I'm also going to refurb the old plow I have and give it new metal where it needs. I'll drop a post when I'm all done!

**Bill725 thank you for the belt and the clutch references. I was very happy to see I had a spare belt yesterday so I could troubleshoot my problem. A good problem can keep me lying awake in bed endlessly until I figure it out. I will order a spare belt to have around, thanks for the Parts Number.

Really appreciate all the fine help! If any of you find yourself in MA drinks or coffees on me! Truly appreciate it!

Dan

Edited by DreMetalwork
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2 hours ago, DreMetalwork said:

Clutch Management was certainly the word of the day yesterday.

Thanks for the coffee invitation! Likely won't happen since MA is far from MT, but if you're ever vacationing in Glacier National Park, we are just 30 minutes away.

Manual clutches work great once you develop the technique and a little muscle memory. You can shift quickly from forward to reverse without grinding gears with a little practice. (These transmissions are non-syncro and not designed to shift while moving.) the clutch/brake combo works well for stopping and shifting.

Another note, be sure to adjust the belt guides - these vary from bent wire stops to pulley covers,  to pulley brakes, depending on the model. They stop and position the belts when you declutch and help with shifting by stopping the transmission pulley from spinning in neutral.

I regularly plow lots of snow with my AC 710 - works great! (old pic, current upgrades include a simplicity plow, wheel weights and electric lift)

63569da7a51da_plowingsnow.jpg.964400f3935805c70fb9907b08c8dd51.jpg

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AC, I hear great things about glacier park, never been out there but hopefully I can sometime. A person who lives up that way must know a thing or two about moving some snow around, and that picture proves it! Thanks for the  inspiration with it, sure looks like you get the opportunity to use it often too.
 

I will be sure to check the belt guides and see if they need adjustment as well, thanks for your help again AC, you gave me a lot of great advice I hope you have a great week

 

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51 minutes ago, DreMetalwork said:

sure looks like you get the opportunity to use it often too.

Whitefish is below the base of a ski mountain - 20 minutes from my house to the lifts. Snow is significantly less here in town than on the ski hill. 90-120 inch snowpack up top vs. 12-24 inches at my house. The snow comes in weeklong systems that drop 3 or 4 inches every day. If I don't plow, snowpack builds up quickly. The little tractor plows are ideal for this situation. It only takes about 20 minutes to plow out my 200 ft of double lane driveway and cul-de-sac.  I have a Simplicity 7016 with a snow thrower for the occasional deeper dump and to move the berms back a couple times a winter.

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AC, it's nice being not to far from the slopes, I grew up around Central New York and they got a couple ski areas (within 40 mins) around. It gets considerably more snow up that way then where I'm at now in Mass. I'd imagine we only got about 5 snows last year where I'd think about having to plow or shovel lol. In CNY ten years ago, I would have to shovel to get to work, shovel out a spot at work, shovel my car out to leave work and then shovel to get back into the driveway. I don't necessarily miss that 😂. Sorry it took a couple days to respond, I took a tree down over the weekend and ended up getting poison ivy all over me. I just finished decontaminating my place but at one point I just figured a good fire ought to do it lol 😩 ughhhh.  Enjoy your week AC!

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2 hours ago, DreMetalwork said:

I took a tree down over the weekend and ended up getting poison ivy all over me. I just finished decontaminating my place but at one point I just figured a good fire ought to do it lol 😩 ughhhh. 

Yikes! Poison ivy and oak are one thing not common in Montana. I've seen some in the Missouri breaks, but it is only tiny, anemic plants on the ground - too cold, too dry? We have things like Buckthorn (Hawthorn) down low and Devil's club in the higher wetter mountains to rip us up. Hope you're feeling less itchy!

What's involved in decontaminating your place? Removing vines and plants?

I worked on forest fires for 45 years. Our medical folks used Dawn dish liquid for cleanup and clothes washing in poison ivy and oak country. They felt it worked as well or better than expensive lotions and cleaning products. Another use in addition to washing up dishes and oily ducks.

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I definitely appreciate the well-wishes, itch has been easing up the past 24 hours since I went to the doc and got a nice steroid cream... sadly enough and I'm kicking myself now is, when I discovered it on my neck, I thought it was a bug bite or something similar. So I spent about three/four days wearing the same coat/ leathers/ welding helmet/ hats and endded up spreading the oil to other parts of my body and clothes. If I recognized it as poison Ivy right away, I would have started to decontaminate all the tools and clothes/ bedding quicker. 
 

 As far as removing it from the yard, I haven't found any long term solutions yet. Luckily, it is contained to only one area behind a fence so I tried to keep the fence clear by ripping any vines that come up (hopefully by the root of you can) and moving them with a hoe to a trash bag and disposing. Follow that by throwing out  the pants and shirt I wore and cleaning the rubber boots with acetone. 
 

As far as decontaminating my home; the clothes that I didn't want to throw away I sent through the wash on hottest and longest settings, brought the other things I can't wash leathers and wool to the dry cleaners. Threw away all old bedding and bought new pillows sheets. Sprayed down hard surfaces with alcohol as long as it didn't  ruin the surface. Drank a couple beers to decontaminate the liver 😉, and crossed my fingers that I did the best I could do. I also bought this Tecnu Posion ivy wash that you can use on your body and tools to wipe down. 

And to wrap everything up the final thing I have to wipe down with acetone issss..... THE TRACTOR. of course I had to touch just about everything I love after getting in those weeds.  
 

I'm not tooo sure yet what the lesson I learned was.

Maybe it was if I feel something scratchy don't assume it's a bug bite.... but I dunno that seems like a pretty stupid lesson :) 

(and yes immediately take a shower and maybe even use a preemptive ivy wash  if you have been out in the bush.)

Also... dawn dish detergent definitely works just as well for washing the urushiol oil off. I guess after watching it keep appearing on my body after a couple days the more things i could wash off in the better.
 

 

 

 

Edited by DreMetalwork
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2 hours ago, DreMetalwork said:

As far as removing it from the yard, I haven't found any long term solutions yet.

Use Round Up Poison Ivy Plus Tough Weed Killer.

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