Jump to content

Unofficial Home of Old Simplicity & Allis-Chalmers Garden Tractors

Deutz-Allis 1920/ sunstar steering issue


art deco

Recommended Posts

I find it nearly impossible to keep the thing straight.  I don't think anything is loose in the steering mechanism but have noticed that with the motor off I can move the steering wheel about 3" with my pinky. Is there some way to tighten that up?  Thanks in advance 

20230402_160112_HDR.jpg

20230402_160122.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1920 would be power steering, and that PS is really not designed to be steered with no hydraulic power.   It is normal to have slop with no power and if you steer it too much (like lock to lock) without power it is very easy for the  PS unit to lose its "prime" and then you have no steering at all.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ronald Hribar

I would check heim joints on steering cylinder

also the attachment points for steering cylinder

i had problems at those points on my Prestige 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are referring to the steering wheel staying in the same position when the wheels are straight ahead after turning , that is not possible with power steering.  My 1920 and JD X540 both "crawl". I discovered this when I put the steering knob on my X540 in the same position as on my 210 & 214 (manual steering). The knob on the X540 never stayed in the same position, nor does the knob on my 1920. For that matter, neither did the knob on the Allis Chalmers 7060 field tractor. It's a matter of creep between the steering pump and the steering cylinder.

Edited by Hick
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes... it's power steering.  The issue i have is that it is almost impossible to keep the tractor in a straight line and I'm constantly having to correct and the result looks like I am drunk.  since i only use it to plow snow, keeping it straight and under control is desirable.  I assumed that the play in the steering wheel was the reason but realize now that would only be the case only if it was mechanical.  So the steering wheel then functions like the implement lift hydraulics and operates the hydraulic cylinder that, in turn, operates the steering mechanism.  So I guess I need to look elsewhere for the problem.  Thanks for the help so far though...  I'd get rid of it and buy something that isn't 30+ years old... but it is an addiction.  I'm rebuilding the M20 in it over the summer and going to add a second hydraulic line to operate the plow angle.  I figure that fixing the steering would be a good thing to do and a lot easier while the motor is out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, art deco said:

yes... it's power steering.  The issue i have is that it is almost impossible to keep the tractor in a straight line and I'm constantly having to correct and the result looks like I am drunk.  since i only use it to plow snow, keeping it straight and under control is desirable. 

My 1920 is the same way. Could be looseness in the joints. Either the cylinder mounting or the tie rod ends. I've had it for several years, but have not investigated the looseness. The only time I think about it is when I'm using it, then at the end of the day I call it quits, and forget to check it later on!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/6/2023 at 8:53 AM, art deco said:

So the steering wheel then functions like the implement lift hydraulics and operates the hydraulic cylinder that, in turn, operates the steering mechanism.  So I guess I need to look elsewhere for the problem.

Very common with most yard and garden tractors.  As you guessed there is not a mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the wheels.   They call it hydrostatic PS.  Even new tractors with PS require constant steering input.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

constant steering input is one thing but the amount required seems really excessive.  is there some way to reduce the hydraulic output to stiffen the steering a bit?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Excessive wandering can be caused by wear in the power steering unit.   Fluid passing by o-rings etc.   There is a place in Independence, MO that rebuilds them for a reasonable price of about $300.  

Much cheaper than new replacement, and work better than new.  I know of 2 people that have used them, one for a Kubota and the other for a Simplicity Conquest, and both very happy, turn around in less than 2 weeks.

Midwest Directional Steering

21212 E Truman Rd, Independence, MO  64056

 816-796-6400

www.midweststeering.com

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to jump in, but your troubles reminded me of a road grader I used to plow snow with around our ranger station. It was an Austin Western 4-wheel drive/4-wheel steer motor grader. 100% hydraulic operated with separate front and rear steering controls. Front steer used a big T-bar with no centering mechanism, and rear steer used a front-to-rear lever in the array of blade controls to turn right-to-left. You would make minor turns and soon be going around in circles with front wheels pointed one way and rear wheels pointed the other. No way to sense wheel settings without looking at the tires. Very versatile, but crazy weird to operate!

 

99H.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...