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goatfarmer

Briggs question

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goatfarmer
I recently purchased a new 11hp Briggs & Stratton off EBay,to replace the tired plant in my 3410 Landlord. Unfortunately,the replacement engine had no manuals or paperwork with it. It's model #254427, type 0026, code 85120211 There are two wires that come out of the engine cover,near the starter.A black,and a red,that go into a plastic plug. I believe these are from the stator? Would those be used for the charging system? I'm trying to get away from using the old starter/generator system on the tractor now. If these wires are for charging,is there a regulator used somewhere? Also,is there a way to date this engine? I went to the Briggs site,and kinda got lost!! TIA!!! kenny

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roma3112
HI these 2 wires are from the flywheel alternator. If you have electric start or lights this would connect to your charging system. If it is working properly you should see 12vdc +/_ at thet "red" terminal. As engine speed rpm go up the reading should float around 13 or so

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scottope
Yes the wires are from the stator, there are a couple of different systems used, with the red and blak wire you should have the 12V dc in the red, that goes to the positive side of the battery. The other wire should be connected only to the lights, you need to check to make sure you do not have A/C Voltage in the red wire, if you do then you need the regulator. Hope this helps!!! mark at Scott Landscaping

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Spyder
Kenny, I agree, the B&S site is difficult to navigate. Needs better organization. Anyhow, I retrieved the URL for the Illustrated Parts List, this was all I could find to help you. Bookstores and small engine shops sell a generallized repair manual for most all engines. Check on Amazon or Jackssmallengines for these sources. Her is a link to the IPL covering 254400 to 254499 engines. http://www.briggsandstratton.com/ipl/pdfs/MS8564.pdf DaveG

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goatfarmer
Thanks for the info,folks!! Unusual to find a 17 year old engine that's never been used! But anyway... So if I get 13 or so VDC from the red wire when it's running,I can run this wire to + side of battery,without a regulator? That way I can eliminate the starter/generator on the tractor now,since this engine has a starter already mounted. If I need a regulator,any ideas on which one to use? The one on the tractor is the old style one used with the generator.I know that one will be different. Again,TIA!! kenny

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goatfarmer
OK,gang,I received a reply from Briggs concerning how the engine was set up. what they say is.... <The stator is a 10 amp, DC regulated (for battery charging), 20 volt AC alternator. So yes, it will charge a battery and run lights (AC) on the tractor.> They were right,because at idle,it put's out about 13.5-14V,but at full throttle,it goes up to over 21V,which will cook the battery. Would putting a resistor in line,such as a Chrysler type ballast resistor,drop it down enough? Any other thoughts? And what does DC regulated Acalternator mean? As always,thanks in advance!! kenny

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Dutch
Kenny, The way a regulator works is, it constantly monitors the battery voltage and the load that is being drawn from the battery, and "tells" the alternator how much to put back in the battery. A "resistor" won't do that. You need a real regulator. Your best bet is to contact one of our dealer members (Sandy Lake, Al Eden, Jeff Nemes, etc.). They will have catalogs (and experience) to determine what tractors used that engine, and which regulator will work with it.

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badcars
dude, i am not being smart or anything but, if the wire is not hooked to a battery of any kind the voltage will be wild. it sees a dead battery and is beating itself to death trying to charge it. try hooking to a base voltage and ty to get an accuate voltage reading. the only reason i knw this is because i just went through the same thing with an ohv briggs. the system is based on a hot battery, this may work for you and may not, but it is worth a try!! badcars

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PatRarick
Kenny, According to the engine numbers you furnished, you need a Briggs #691185 voltage regulator, about $70 list. This is a "new" number. The old number is 394890, and if you can find a dealer with this on his shelf, the list is about $60 Pat

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goatfarmer
I do have an old dead battery that I could hook the wires up to,and see what happens. If it's still putting out excess voltage,then it looks like regulator time. Thanks,again!! kenny

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Dutch
A battery is one of the most difficult components to test in an electrical system (there are so many things that can go wrong with a battery). Whenever I troubleshoot an electrical system, the first thing I do is install a battery I KNOW is good and fully charged. After the diagnosis is complete, and repairs made, I reinstall the original battery. Using an "old dead battery" is like using old stale contaminated gasoline if you're trying to tune an engine. Don't cut corners. One mistake and what you may "see what happens" is the alternator going up in smoke. If you hook the alternator wire directly to any battery, what WILL happen is, the battery will overcharge and be destroyed, or the alternator will burn itself out, or BOTH. Install the proper regulator.

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goatfarmer
You're right,a dead battery wouldn't do much to figure out the problem,since it would be trying to recharge it to full strength. :)Looks like regulator time!! thanks again kenny

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PatRarick
Forgot to mention in my reply above, that the regulator will come with a double wire plug to connect to the alternator wire on the engine. It will have a single wire to connect to your electrical system. It has a special plug that you can cut off and wire direct, or you can order the wire with the plug from your Briggs dealer. Pat

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goatfarmer
SUCCESS!!! I purchased the regulator mentioned by Pat Rarick,and installed it tonite. Puts out about 12.6V at idle,12.9-13V at high speed. Excellent! You guys are the grrrrreatest! Thanks to all! kenny

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